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Forum > Pattern Modifications, Design Changes & Pattern Drafting > When to insert shoulder pads?

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When to insert shoulder pads?
RMJ
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RMJ  Friend of PR
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Date: 9/14/07 11:09 AM

I am making a lined jacket for my husband. The Folkwear Pattern (152) instructions say to put the shoulder pads in prior to setting the sleeve. I understand why they do this - the pad is supposed to extend into the seam allowance, but the lining for the jacket body is supposed to be sewn to the outer fabric along the armscye prior to inserting the sleeve. But I can't imagine attaching the sleeve to such a thick wad of fabric/shoulder pad! I've already figured out how to change the instructions to add the shoulder pad later, but I'm just wondering, is their way at all normal? Should I try it? Does it have any advantages?

Ruth
-- Edited on 9/14/07 11:09 AM --

Tom P
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Tom P  Friend of PR
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In reply to RMJ


Date: 9/14/07 12:20 PM

I really can't imagine what the instructions are getting at. I always just loosely tack the shoulder pad at each of the three corners after the jacket is pretty much complete. You can insert the shoulder pads and sleevehead (if any) right up until you hem the jacket lining at the bottom.

I also don't understand why the lining should be sewn to the outer cloth anywhere except the cuffs, neckline, and hem. If you sew it to the armscye, how do you set in the sleeve linings? A lot of patterns have you tack the armscyes of lining and outer cloth together, but I don't even bother with that (I'm being lazy; I can understand why one would want to).

Regardless, if you want to attach lining to outer cloth at the armscye, you can do it with two tacks at top and bottom at any time, even after finishing the hem.

RMJ
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In reply to Tom P


Date: 9/14/07 12:38 PM

Per the instructions, the sleeve linings have the seam allowance turned under and are then sewn by hand to the lining of the jacket body at the armscye.

You said the pads could be inserted up until the jacket lining is hemmed (and presumably attached to the jacket), but per the instructions, the jacket lining hem is sewn to the outer cloth hem prior to sleeve setting. I think this is because the hem is unusual for a jacket, the outer fabric and lining are sewn together and that seam is right at the bottom. Sounds strange, but is normal for a Prince Charlie Jacket. Maybe that's why the rest of the instructions seem strange. I still think I can work around it and put the pads in after the sleeve.
Ruth

Tom P
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In reply to RMJ


Date: 9/14/07 2:57 PM

I see. I should have said that I think you can insert the pads up until you close up the lining. It sounds like the pattern instructions have you doing a sort of bagged lining, that is closed at the armscye. My recent jackets have had either a row of topstitching at the bottom or a loose-fittng lining that can accomodate a pleat at the bottom (I catchstitch those).

I still don't see why the lining and outer cloth are sewn together at the armscye, though.

I would definitely rearrange the instructions for a couple of reasons (as you've no doubt already concluded). For one thing, it'd be impossible for me to sew a clean armscye seam with the shoulder pad in there, and that seam is probably the most visible seam in the jacket. Second, the lining armscye seams get a lot of stress. My hand stitching isn't as secure as my machine, so I'd rearrange the instructions so I could sew the lining armscyes with a machine. It'd be relatively easy to leave open 6-12in. or so on an underam seam on the body or sleeve to turn the coat through, then slipstitch that closed.

I've just about stopped reading the pattern instructions, anyway . I just sort of run through them once to see what pieces are there and how they're intended to go together.

WinterBV
WinterBV
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Date: 4/4/12 2:31 PM

I'm getting ready to tackle this pattern for the first time, making a woolen jacket with a vest in a medium weight 'dressy' cotton fabric. Since this is for a piper, I am considering a pleated gore in the back as well as under the arms - and also eliminating the shoulder pads. The piper in question will be using this for fancy gigs. I've noticed that when there are shoulder pads, it looks quite awkward when the pipes are in position. If a man (or woman, for that matter) has broad enough shoulders, do you think I can get away with it?

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