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Forum > Miscellaneous > sewing machine for a seven year old ( Moderated by Deepika, EleanorSews, CynthiaSue)

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sewing machine for a seven year old
ccdcar
ccdcar
Advanced Beginner
CA USA
Member since 4/3/04
Posts: 113
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Date: 11/14/07 8:51 PM

My seven year old niece is showing an interest in sewing. Her mom suggested I get her a toy machine for her birthday and help her learn to use it--I will be staying there for a week over the holidays--and probably showing both of them. I am so excited--I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions of a machine to get for a 7 year old and of any tools for teaching a little one. Thanks.

Skye
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Skye  Friend of PR
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NEW ZEALAND
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In reply to ccdcar


Date: 11/14/07 9:00 PM

IMHO - dont get a toy one - too frustrating Also depends on the amount of $ you want to spend. I bought a used Elna Lotus for my DD when she was 10 - straight and zig zag with basic button hole. She still has that wee machine 10yrs on tho' she much prefers to use my SM wihch has a few more features.
Both my DD and DS learnt to sew on my machine under close supervision when they were about 6-7yrs old - My DS still talks about the big kite we made out of parka nylon together

------
Wellington, NZ

didda
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didda
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Date: 11/14/07 10:15 PM

i agree with skye, don't buy a toy machine. there is a reason they are called "toys". they are not intended for real use. barbie clothes or baby doll clothes at best.

a good used machine (or inexpensive new one, depending on your budget) would be a much better investment. she won't need all the bells and whistles until she has learned the basics.

i learned to sew on my mom's machine when i was 8. (i had been handsewing for 4 years by then) i had to wait until i could reach the foot pedal before mom would allow me to use the machine, and being from a family of short people, it took that long.

------
Fabric Fast 2008 - YTD Totals
Disallowed Yards Purchased: 12 1/2
Allowed Yards Purchased: 9 (to complete a garment)
3 (for having sewn 30 yards)
Yards Sewn: 43.500
Items Made: 21



Member since 12/31/69
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Date: 11/14/07 10:33 PM

This recent thread from the Sewing machinefroum on PR may have some helpful info.

If you are looking for something simple and extremely durable, a serviced vintage machine is worth considering. If you are concerned about the electricity or the motor getting out of control for her accidentily, then a hand crank machine may be a good option to consider.

I good, vintage machine can easily become a family heirloom to be enjoyed and used by DD now and for many years. She could even teach her children to sew on that same machine.

diane s
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diane s  Friend of PR
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Date: 11/15/07 1:35 AM

I think the Sears Kenmore Mini Ultra is a good beginner machine. It's small size is nice for a child, although I bought one for my 22 year old stepdaughter and we made kitchen curtains on it. Last year it was $60.00 the day after Thanksgiving.

------
My grandmother taught me to sew when I was 10, and I've been sewing ever since.

Princess Jenny
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Princess Jenny
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Date: 11/15/07 6:27 AM

Another vote for the Kenmore Mini Ultra.
My 10 yo dd, Sunny, has one we bought a year ago for her birthday. She manages it very well on her own. It sews very well, too. I've been known to sit down and run a seam on it when she has a color thread in it that is exactly what I need. Its buttonhole is pretty good too. And it comes in pretty colors. We bought hers for around $60.00 and it is blue.

Jen

------
The mark of a true seamstress is not in her ability to sew,
but in her tenacity to rip.

Lady_Mame
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Lady_Mame
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WA USA
Member since 3/11/07
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Date: 11/15/07 3:39 PM

Jenny, out of curiousity, is it possible to add a hand-crank to a circa 1948 machine that was never designed for one. Our power is completely sketchy during the winter, and I 've been trying to figure a way to circumvent these issues.

------
Needle Needle Straight and Slim, Dust and Sweep the House for Him! --Grimm Fairy Tales



Member since 12/31/69
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In reply to Lady_Mame


Date: 11/15/07 7:02 PM

It depends on the machine. The machine has to be belt driven and there needs to be a motor mounting hole below the handwheel to attach the geared hand crank. Also, if the machine doesn't have a slotted/spoked hand wheel, one will have to be retro-fitted for the machine.

Here is an eBay listing (NAYY) for a hand crank machine. You can click on the photos ad enlarge them and get a good idea of the set up and how it all works.

The Singer 99 (three-quarter sized, black, cast iron machine) that I have available in hand crank was actually born as an electric machine, and once the hand wheel is properly fitted, it can be switiched from HC to electric via one bolt and one screw.

Be careful when buying the 66 and 99's- they must be in a base or table to operate.

What I like best about this set up for a child is that it is sooooo durable and steady on the table top. Kids can be rough on plastic stuff- no worries with one of these cast iron beauties!

What machine do you want to convert to HC?
-- Edited on 11/15/07 7:04 PM --

Lady_Mame
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Lady_Mame
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WA USA
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Date: 11/16/07 10:27 AM

It's a Japanese made clone of either a singer or a kenmore. It's badged as a Universal. It does have the motor-mount hole you are talking about, and it is belt driven with an external belt.

Would I not be able to use the motor if I converrted? I don't want that!

------
Needle Needle Straight and Slim, Dust and Sweep the House for Him! --Grimm Fairy Tales



Member since 12/31/69
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In reply to Lady_Mame


Date: 11/16/07 10:36 AM

You have to unbolt the motor bracket to attach the hand crank mechanism. So, yes the motor, which is attached to the motor bracket, must be removed along with the belt.

You would also need to replacethe hand wheel with a spoked wheel. You can use the spoked wheel for both motor and hand crank operation.

To get back to motor operation, unbolt the handcrank, bolt on the motor mount and loop the motor belt back around the hand wheel.

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