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Forum > Miscellaneous > Summer books to read and enjoy ( Moderated by Deepika, EleanorSews, CynthiaSue)

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Summer books to read and enjoy
What suggestions do you have?
Jennifer shaw
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Jennifer shaw  Friend of PR
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Date: 6/15/08 2:56 PM

Every summer is my one time where I really can sit down and read all day, if the need arises. I found a really good one on beauty and fashion called, Free Gift with Purchase. Easy read, and entertaining to boot.

Peggy
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Peggy
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In reply to Jennifer shaw


Date: 6/15/08 6:06 PM

I just read Debbie Macomber's Twenty Wishes and enjoyed that alot. Easy and light reading.

Izzie
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Date: 6/15/08 6:43 PM

I just finished Sarah Addison Allen's The Sugar Queen and it was fabulous! Her first book, Garden Spells, is equally good. This young author has a great career ahead of her...I can't wait for the next book!

Fictionfan
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Date: 6/15/08 9:50 PM

What kind of books do you want to read?

I'm reading some Claire Shaeffer books, and if you want detailed sewing stuff to read about couture and industry techniques, they are good.

I don't have a handle on non-fiction other than contemplative stuff, but the popular fiction genres I read a lot. Without some direction, you've got me started on a long-winded post, so stop here if you don't want to read popular fiction. I read about a book a day, mostly genre books, so I read a lot of authors whose books I can't get at my library. My big vice.

Jane Austen is my all-time favorite author.

I really love Amy Tan's books, but there aren't very many of them.

One of my friends likes Jodi Picoult, but I thought the one book I read was depressing, so I haven't read any others.

For Humor, Christopher Moore's stuff is hilarious, and my 15 year old son doesn't read anything but Dave Barry and Mad Magazine these days.

For general romance, I like anything by Barbara Bretton. Nothing scary or offensive in her books, and nothing fantastical if you don't like the alternate reality styles of fiction.

Susan Mallery's books are plentiful, light reading.

Rachel Gibson writes entertaining, present day romances.

Lavyrle Spencer is retired, but her books are still being reprinted. Many books, all heartwarming, individual stories so no order to them.

Jayne Ann Krentz, Linda Howard, Diana Palmer, and Nora Roberts are the queens of women's romance.
Nora Roberts takes up more room at my local stores than any other author. She also writes mysteries as J D Robb, but I haven't liked those books.

Julie Garwood has romantic suspense books that read well.

Kay Hooper, Rachel Lee, and Catherine Coulter also write romantic suspense series that can be found in the romance or mystery sections.

Suzanne Brockmann's book #13 of the Troubleshooters coming out next month. That series is action/romance/mystery/adventure with history and politics thrown in. She has plots that arc over several books of the series, so I don't recommend they be read out of order. The first is The Unsung Hero. Personally, I can't put them down. She has other books that are being reprinted from her earlier years, too.

Her husband, Ed Gaffney recently published his fourth mystery book, Enemy Combatant, which is my favorite of his so far.

Mary Balogh is the goddess if you like Regencies.

I like all of Laura Kinsale's books, but she had a long dry spell, so they were off the shelves for a while, but her earlier books are now being reprinted. My favorites of hers were Flowers From The Storm, For My Lady's Heart, and Shadow Heart.

Jayne Ann Krentz writes as Amanda Quick in victorian periods mostly.

I love Carla Kelly's books, but they are hard to find. One is in print at the moment, that I know of.

Julia Quinn has entertaining, light, regency era stories, and her dedications are the most entertaining I've read.

Johanna Lindsay is also prolific in a range of historical romance.

Diana Gabaldon has long books based on time-travel to Scotland in the Jacobite period (circa 1745). Even though I'm not one for time-travel, I liked Outlander.

For Sci-fi and fantasy, I love Jim Butcher's books (2 series: Dresden Files, which was on TV, and Furies of Calderon).

I'll read anything by Wen Spencer. Endless Blue is the latest. Tinker and Wolf Who Rules is one set. A Brother's Price stands alone. Alien Taste was her first book that hooked me in, and it is followed by 3 more Ukiah Oregon books.

Anne McCaffrey is a master. She has several worlds that she writes. Her son Todd has taken up the Pern world and has three books so far that are prequels to her stories.

Patricia Briggs's Moon Called, Blood Bound, Iron Kissed were great, and she has a few other Sci-fi books that are older.

I like anything by Lois McMaster Bujold, too, but a lot of her books are hard to find.

Orson Scott Card is a long-winded guy, so good summer reading if you like Sci-fi with a lot of philosophy and sociology thrown in.

I love Joe Haldeman's books, but he isn't everyone's cup of tea.

S L Viehl's Stardoc books are very well researched with regard to the medical stuff, which is really important because the lead character is a doctor. She also writes a vampire series, under Lynn Viehl, that is very dark, with a conspiracy history theme.

Simon R. Green writes ghost stories/horror books that I find in the Sci-fi section. Great if you like spooky stories, but nightmares if you don't.

J R Ward's Black Dagger Brotherhood is great, but not if you don't want to read vampire stuff (the vampires are the good guys in her books, a separate species). Her villains smell like baby powder.

Kelley Armstrong's Women of the Otherworld books are entertaining. Werewolves, witches, warlocks, vampires, half-demons, and normal-but-evil humans abound.

Tanya Huff's books are also great, and the Blood books have been reprinted. I like her offshoot Smoke series better, though.

Charlaine Harris, Kim Harrison, Laurell K. Hamilton (A LOT, REALLY A LOT of sex, though, in her books) are also popular right now.

Christine Feehan has three series going, and for each of them, if you've read one in a series, you've read them all. She is prolific.

Savannah Russe writes the Darkwings vampire spy books.

C. T. Adams and Cathy Clamp write the Sazi (were-animals) books and the Thrall (vampire-like parasites) books.

Alexis Morgan has her Paladin series, battling the Others who cross from another universe. She's one of my new authors.

Katie MacAlister writes hilarious books, some with the vampire or demon-handler theme, and some just normal, comical romance. I thought I would wet my pants laughing when I read The Corset Diaries and Improper English.

Katie MacAlister also writes young adult books under Katie Maxwell. The Year My Life Went Down The Loo is the first of her Emily/Dru books.

Eoin Colfer's Artemis Fowl series has a new book coming out. They are in the young/independent reader section of the stores.

Brian Jacques's Redwall books are popular with pre-adolescent boys, and I like them, too. A variety of small animals are the characters.

Erin Hunter's Warriors books are wonderful, especially if you like cats, but they are really one long story over two sets (completed) of 6 books, and a third in progress.

Meg Cabot's writing is fun. She wrote The Princess diaries.

If you've somehow missed J K Rowling's Harry Potter books, they are wonderful, but read them in order.

I like Dan Brown's earlier books, Digital Fortress and Deception Point, which are techno-thrillers. But I did not like Angels and Demons or the Da Vinci Code.

That would take me though some of the summer.



------
Fictionfan

Sew Confused
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Sew Confused
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Date: 6/15/08 10:16 PM

Quote:
Diana Gabaldon has long books based on time-travel to Scotland in the Jacobite period (circa 1745). Even though I'm not one for time-travel, I liked Outlander.


I love time travel books but a warning is in order on the first book in the Outlander series...avoid it at all costs if you find gratuitous sex offensive. I won't let my 16 year old daughter read it.

------
Paula

"In Seattle you haven't had enough coffee until you can thread a sewing machine while it's running."
- Jeff Bezos, Amazon.com founder

Visit my blog at www.sewconfused.blogspot.com

jhansby
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Date: 6/15/08 11:55 PM

If you want to do some fun reading about couture and Coco Chanel (historical fiction), try "The Collection" by Gioia Diliberto. I enjoyed reading about the making of the clothes, although the story itself could have delved deeper into the characters.

Sew Cool

Sew Cool
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In reply to Jennifer shaw


Date: 6/16/08 0:26 AM

Hi, "Christmas Caroline" is a fast and funny read. Can't remember the author. A cross between "The Devil Wears Prada" and "A Christmas Carol."

Sew Cool

KitnRose
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Date: 6/16/08 0:26 AM

I've fallen in love with Terry Pratchett's Discworld series. While they are moderately sequential in nature and build on each other, you don't HAVE to read them in order. Actually the two first (The Color of Magic and Lights Fantastic) are among the weakest in the series, IMHO. Which means they're merely really, really good rather than utterly fantastic. My personal favorite is Masquerade, but it works best if you've read Witches Abroad first.

And Pratchett's Tiffany Aching trilogy is even better than the adult Discworld books.

His series that starts with Truckers is imaginative and thought provoking. Technically it's also a kid's book but it's GOOD.

Another fantasty/fiction writer I love is Patricia Wrede. Her Enchanted Forest series (starts with Talking to Dragons) is a lot of fun. It's yet another kids book but it's witty, great characters, and just as much fun the second read-through. Her adult books are also fantastic but I have a special place in my heart for the Enchanted Forest. Gotta love a princess who gets tired of princessing and runs off to join the dragons. :)

------
Kit
"Never underestimate the power of the right dress!" - drsue
"Hyu gots to know how to sveet tok de costumers, dollink" - Girl Genius, 11-24-08

Michelle T

Michelle T
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Date: 6/16/08 0:54 AM

I have read two books by Eliot Pattison, he writes about a Han Chinese investigator who is imprisoned in Tibet. Very powerful topical books.

I am also reading Michael Connelley, William Deverall, Nelson DeMille and James Patterson at the moment.

I have read almost all of Anne Perry's books and am waiting to get Elizabeth George's new book when it comes out in paperback.

I pick up romances at thrift shops for a quarter and leave them behind when I am finished reading them. I have to admit I have used romances to light campfires, when the kindling was wet.

I heard about a small book of poetry today written by a 80+ year old lady, on the radio this morning. She read a bit on the radio and although I generally am not drawn to poetry, I will buy it to read to dh around the campfire. (Still light at five O'clock, by Nina Brooks)

I tend to read mystery/crime and love English mysteries. I add a smattering of romances when the crime is getting to depressing.

------
Proud parent of a Dwight International School Honour Roll Student

Elona
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In reply to Jennifer shaw
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Date: 6/16/08 2:22 AM

Suite Française by Irène Némirovsky, a stunning work of fiction about what it was like to live in France and to flee ahead of the conquerers when the Germans invaded the country during the summer of June, 1940. The amazing thing is that the author was actually living that life even as she wrote the book.

For us, people who have never been conquered by a foreign power, the happenings in this little book are scarcely imaginable.

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