SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Forum > Beginner's Forum > help binding a woven tank ( Moderated by EleanorSews)

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
help binding a woven tank
mssewcrazy
star
mssewcrazy  Friend of PR
Advanced
Mississippi USA
Member since 3/4/03
Posts: 2558
Send Message

      



Date: 8/16/08 9:39 AM

I have a woven tank cut out. I have bound these when made in knit fabrics but now I am making it from a cotton no stretch fabric which the pattern actually calls for. I don't want the facings but to bind it with self fabric. I read the knowledge base on here and some of the message boards but they seem to deal with the knit fabrics. Could anyone tell me how wide to cut the bias strips and how much seam allowance to sew. Do I want these doubled like French binding or do I want to get out the bias tape maker things? On the knits I trim away on the back but want these edges finished. Any help would be appreciated. I have bound quilts and a few things but am not sure about a woven tank. The cotton I am using is medium weight ( slightly thicker than broadcloth) but not stiff.

Lynnelle
starstarstar
Lynnelle  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Michigan USA
Member since 4/8/07
Posts: 2513
Board Moderator
Send Message

      



In reply to mssewcrazy


Date: 8/16/08 9:51 AM

Nancy posted a wonderful tutorial on how to do a Hong Kong seam finish. Perhaps you can get some ideas from here.

L-

mssewcrazy
star
mssewcrazy  Friend of PR
Advanced
Mississippi USA
Member since 3/4/03
Posts: 2558
Send Message

      



Date: 8/16/08 10:36 AM

I love that tutorial. I will definitely study it. I would love to do a jacket with seams like those. I am at the point with my tank of deciding how wide to cut the bias strips. I have been reading through my sewing library and never realized how vague the references to this technique are. One vintage book said to cut 1 and one fourth inch bias and sew with one-eighth seam allowance after cutting away the seam allowance. This sounds really narrow but I am not finding a lot else. Perhaps I need to just measure some purchased tape and try to do the same thing. I am one who really likes written directions but I am wondering if there are any available for binding the neck and armholes of a woven fabric. I cannot even decide if I need a double binding or a single one. Decisions decisions! I am so bare and have sewed up a simple fall shirt. I have some fabric left and cut a tank to match to make a set and now I seem stuck in limbo. The fabric is a little bit stiff and I think it really would be more wearable as a shirt jacket over a matching tank. I think it looks too big to wear as a buttoned up blouse. I had made this shirt once before in a softer drapey fabric and while it was a little big in the shoulders I liked wearing it. Thanks for the tutorial link.

Marji
starstarstarstar
Marji
Advanced
Missouri USA
Member since 9/19/06
Posts: 1866
Send Message

      



In reply to mssewcrazy
thumbsup 1 member likes this.


Date: 8/16/08 11:16 AM

That is a great tutorial for hong kong seam finishes, but in this case, I don't think it applies to what you want to do.
I'm assuming that you are wanting to bind the neck and armhole edges with binding?

There are several ways to approach this, depending on how you want the edge to look.
Do you want the binding to show, as an edging, or do you want to turn it under completely?
I have a set of woven tops that I've used 3 different methods for binding the edges. I'll try to run through all of them, then I'm going to go ahead and copy this whole section and add it to my review so that it might be more easily found later.
On this top made from Butterick 6908 I used a bias strip of contrast fabric to bind the neck edge, as a stand up binding that shows. Then I used a bias strip of self fabric to bind and turn under and hand stitch down the armscye, for an invisible finish.
On this top, same pattern I used a bias strip of self fabric to create a bound edge that gives a completely finished edge using a wrap and turn method.

For each method use a 1/4" seam allowance - that means trimming off excess seam allowances at neck edge and armscye. For each method I cut 1 1/8" bias strips. The extra 1/8" is there to allow for the turn of cloth to cover the seam allowance.
Top 1, I cut contrast for the neck edge for a binding that also is a trim edge that shows.
step I. fold the bias strip in half (wrong sides together) and press.
step 2. Then run the neck edge through the serger, and the strip of contrast bias through the serger, so that all raw edges are finished.
step 3. stitch the binding to the neck edge, serged edges together, overlapping the binding at the shoulder edge as shown here. (I no longer have these tops in my possession, to take better pictures, sorry about the picture quality)
step 4. press so that the binding is standing up showing and the serged edges are down, and then stitch in the ditch, or better, stitch 1/16" away (edgestitch) from the seam line, on the tanktop side to keep the binding standing up so that the serged edge doesnt' have a tendency to roll out.

Top 1, I cut self fabric for the armscye edge
For this one, I did not serge the edges, as I wanted a completely enclosed binding, and there is no need to have all that extra thread bulk in an enclosed seam.
Step 1. Fold the binding in half, wrong sides together, and press
Step 2. stitch to armscye, binding to right side of top, raw edges together.
Step 3. Clip curves and trim away scant 1/8" of seam allowance.
Step 4. Wrap binding to inside and hand stitch using fell stitch to inside of top. This works well with a fabric with a lot of texture. On a smooth hard finish fabric, it's going to be a real challenge to hide those hand stitches.
In that case I would suggest stitching the binding to the wrong side of the top, wrapping the binding around to the right side after trimming and clipping the seam allowance, and machine stitching the edge of the binding down as close to the edge of the binding as possible and still making it look nice.

Top #2 I also cut 1 1/8" bias strips, but then made a bias binding using a bias tape maker such as quilters use.
step 1. Press binding using bias binding tool to create a strip that has raw edges pressed toward middle of binding.
step 2. Open out one edge, and stitch using 1/4" seam allowance, right side of binding to right side of top.
Step 3. Clip curves and trim seam allowance.
Step 4. Wrap binding around to inside and invisibly hand stitch binding to seam line.
OR
Step 2. Open out one edge and stitch, using 1/4" seam allowance, right side of binding to Wrong side of top.
Step 3. Clip curves and trim seam allowance.
Step 4. Wrap binding around to outside and press, then machine edge stitch binding in place.

This binding completely encloses the seam allowance, but the binding shows and is a more casual look.
What method you choose depends on the look you're going for and the degree of patience you have for hand stitching.

Hope this helps.

------
Marji
http://fiberartsafloat.blogspot.com

Irene Q
starstarstarstar
Irene Q  Friend of PR
Intermediate
New Hampshire USA
Member since 3/19/04
Posts: 2544
Send Message

      



Date: 8/16/08 11:36 AM

I recently made a bunchof woven tanks, with bindings, so I know exactly what's confusing you. First of all, they need to be bias strips (since this is the beginner's forum). The standard binding in the packages is 1" wide with both sides folded to the center. If you have a 1" bias tape maker, this is the time to use it! Or you can use purchased tape, of course, or try this tip from SewVeryTall. With binding this size, you use 1/4" seams.

You actually have several choices on how to bind the edges...

Binding to be completely on the inside: Leave a 1/4" SA on neck and armhole edges. Sew binding (right sides together) with the stitching in the fold line. (It doesn't have to be exactly in the fold.) Then fold to the inside, press, and stitch down the edge. This binding ends up 1/2" wide.

Binding to be completely on the outside: Same as above, but sew right side of binding to wrong side of tank. This is nice on plaids and stripes where the binding adds a design element.

Binding covers edge like this: In this case, you have no seam allowances on the neck and armhole edges. With commercial double fold tape, you can pin the binding over the edge and sew both the inside and outside at the same time. My homemade tape is never that neatly folded, so I sew the inside edge first, fold it over and press so that the outside edge just covers the stitching, then stitch the outside. This makes a 1/4" finishd binding.

You can also use a French binding to cover both edges. You cut the seam allowances off for this one, too. The bias strips are cut 1.5" wide (or slighty larger, to acount for the fold of the cloth), and press them in half. You sew the doubled edge on the inside and turn it to the outside same as above. This makes a little thicker binding, still 1/4" finished size.

The 1/4" binding is a little narrow. For the aqua stripe, I made a 3/8" binding so the strips were cut 1.5" wide. For a French binding, you'd cut the strips 2.25" wide.

After making a couple of these, I started sewing on the bindings with one of the seams open. This way, I didn't have to pre-measure the edge and sew a seam in the binding before attaching it to the top. This gets a little tricky if you're folding the binding to the outside. I used the same method as in a href='http://sewing.patternreview.com/cgi-bin/review/readreview.pl?readreview=1&ID=1032' target='_blank'>this tip to reverse the seam direction just under the binding.

Hope this helps!!!

Irene Q
starstarstarstar
Irene Q  Friend of PR
Intermediate
New Hampshire USA
Member since 3/19/04
Posts: 2544
Send Message

      



Date: 8/16/08 11:38 AM

Looks like Marji and I were posting at the same time.

Marji
starstarstarstar
Marji
Advanced
Missouri USA
Member since 9/19/06
Posts: 1866
Send Message

      



In reply to Irene Q


Date: 8/16/08 11:44 AM

Yep, looks like we were!
This at least ought to give the OP enough info on how to proceed.
Given how long it takes to compose a post with links that gives this much information, the time stamps show that we were indeed overlapping on posting.

------
Marji
http://fiberartsafloat.blogspot.com

mssewcrazy
star
mssewcrazy  Friend of PR
Advanced
Mississippi USA
Member since 3/4/03
Posts: 2558
Send Message

      



Date: 8/16/08 11:58 AM

I just checked back in and I can't thank you Marji and Irene enough. I am thrilled with the detail of how to do this and think the two posts would be great to add to the knowledge base. I have sewn a lot in past years but most binding I did was like that on old butterick patterns that had you cut a strip that was doubled and folded to the inside like on armholes of jumpers. Most of my experience has been with bias cut facings not binding. I love the rtw look of the bias finishes. I think I would like it to show on the tank even though it is a print and not contrasting but want it to look professional. I do pretty well now with a knit neck that I trim away on the back but think I need to follow your advice to get a finished edge and how wide to cut the strips. I am off to study both of your suggestions and thank you so much. I am sure others will find this very helpful as well. I hope it can be a part of the knowledge base so it will be easy to find always. Otherwise I will make notes from your instructions. I hope to get out of the kitchen and sew it this afternoon if possible. Thanks again.

kaaren
kaaren  Friend of PR
Intermediate
USA
Member since 7/2/05
Posts: 61
Send Message

      



Date: 8/16/08 2:52 PM

You both gave incredible directions on the variations. But I would gently disagree on when to press. I was just lucky enough to take a weekend sit and sew with Louise Cutting. Her first line is "The bias is NEVER pressed in half. It will never lie flat." It is easy to press a crease into bias. (Her binding directions are probably in several of her patterns.) But with a two inch true bias length, she folded wrong sides together (this works for either bias to the wrong or to the right side.) She actually stab pins the binding to the garment in the stitching line, presses just the raw edge and not the folded area of the binding. She stitches the unironed folded bias a presser foot away from the raw edge (it sort of depends on the fabric whether it is anything from 1/4 to 3/8 in). She then wraps the binding around the raw edge and now presses into position. She also inserts a narrow piece of Steam A Seam 2 under the fold. Now you can either edge stitch or do a hidden running stitch under the fold. I think that I would probably do a sl wider bias strip for heavier fabric. But make those samples.

I was at the SF ACC show yesterday and the garments with beautiful bias bindings looked so much better than those made with an interfaced silk facing. I love Louise's directions, but I probably want to use the Cynthia Guffey admonition to baste and baste! Kaaren

mssewcrazy
star
mssewcrazy  Friend of PR
Advanced
Mississippi USA
Member since 3/4/03
Posts: 2558
Send Message

      



Date: 8/16/08 4:41 PM

Thank you Kaaren for the additional information. How wonderful that you got the opportunity to go to that class. I have the Cutting one seam pattern and books that accompany it and find they seem really thorough with instructions. I at first resisted the idea of not pressing the bias but decided to try it unpressed. I cut my strip at 2 inches as I did not know if I had the skill to make a really narrow one look good. I wound up doubling the bias and folding over to the right side and machine stitching.
The neck of the tank is done and that was what I was so worried about. It looks nice and I am really happy with it. I feel sure the arm binding will work as well although my upper arms will never see the light of day so that issue is moot.
Marji, Irene, and Kaaren have done a wonderful job explaining the techniques here. You are great sewing gurus and I am sure many besides myself will find this discussion a big help. I avoided this technique whenever possible in the past as a poorly sewn binding can make even a nicely sewn outfit look terrible. I won't need to avoid it any more I think. Thanks for the help.

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Beginner's Forum >> help binding a woven tank

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Online Class
Fun with Fitting - PANTS
Fun with Fitting - PANTS

Class Details

Online Class
Sew a Designer Unlined Jacket
Sew a Designer Unlined Jacket

Class Details

My Favorite Duffle Bag

My Favorite Duffle Bag

More Info
You Sew Girl 200mm Kiss Purse Pattern

You Sew Girl 200mm Kiss Purse Pattern

More Info

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.