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Forum > Sewing Machines > Pfaff 130 vs Singer 15-91 ( Moderated by Sharon1952, EleanorSews)

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Pfaff 130 vs Singer 15-91
which will be more heavy duty
pearbaby
pearbaby
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Missouri USA
Member since 8/8/07
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Date: 9/9/09 10:55 AM

I want to be able to do some heavier sewing such as curtains, a canvas purse, and maybe upholstery work on a chair. Patch DH denim jeans.

Not heavy work all the time, just once in a while. Will be my back-up machine if something should happen to main one. Mine won't handle heavier fabrics.

Have read all on here (and other places) about both but still can't make a decision

All opinions welcome. Thank you.

Soolip
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Soolip
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Date: 9/9/09 11:13 AM

The 15-91 is fully capable of what you plan to do with it. If it needs to be repaired, parts are easy to find, especially in the US. It produces a nicer straight stitch, imho. It's also quieter than the 130.

The Pfaff 130 is a great and powerful machine. It can also zig-zag. However, if it breaks you may be out of luck as these machines are comparatively rare in the US. I'd be particularly concerned about the internal fiber belt though most of these have lasted for 70+ years. This machine is noisy and doesn't operate as smoothly as the 15-91. It also has a stronger motor, but I cannot say if this translates into more piercing power the 130 has more friction points and therefore requires more power simply to operate. Regular short shank feet will fit and work fine, but you may find that the needle falls ever-so-slightly to the right of center, compared to the 15-91.

I don't think you can go wrong with either machine, but you should try both before deciding. Also, consider the Singer 201-2, which is like the 15-91, except it has a rotary horizontal hook it runs smoother and is easier to thread. Some people have said that the 15-91 is stronger I've sewn on both, and there is no difference. Both machines use the exact same motor. Since you're not planning on doing any free-motion work, the horizontal bobbin isn't really a consideration.


-- Edited on 9/9/09 11:15 AM --

Joey in Katy
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Joey in Katy
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In reply to pearbaby


Date: 9/9/09 4:37 PM

The motor on the Pfaff is more than twice as powerful -- 1.2 amps vs .5 amps. Doesn't mean the 15-91 isn't powerful enough, though.

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Joey
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Yarndiva
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Yarndiva
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Date: 9/10/09 5:29 PM

I have both and must admit I love them both. In terms of power, I feel the Pfaff is the winner. The 15-91 is close behind. With a walking foot, wither would work for you. Each has it's charms. Pfaff can zig zag but my Singer has lots of fun attachments made for it. They both can do free motion darning (for your problem of fixing jeans) but the Singer is easier, no extra part is required.
OK, just get both!

-- Edited on 9/10/09 5:30 PM --

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http://silkmothsewing.blogspot.com/

pearbaby
pearbaby
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Missouri USA
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Date: 9/10/09 8:54 PM

I really can't get but one, however I know where several 15's are really cheap. But will need rewiring. I am very handy; wonder if I could do this?

Soolip
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In reply to pearbaby


Date: 9/10/09 9:05 PM

You can rewire the old Singers very easily. If you can get a 15-91 in good condition, inexpensively, do it. I just saw a 15-91 on ebay go for over $400. I don't know if they are climbing in price, or just if there was a very enthusiastic buyer out there, but they usually go for around $100 to $150.

plafollette
plafollette
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Date: 6/8/11 6:04 PM

I have a Pfaff 130 and a Singer 15-91. I love them both. Granted if the internal cleated belt on the Pfaff 130 needs to be replaced they are next to impossible to find. I have seen them once in a while on ebay. On the Singer 15-91 with it being a direct drive, if the "fiber gear" strips or becomes useless you will not be able to find a replacement. My OSMG preferred Singer while his son (YSMG) leans toward the Pfaff 130. The motor on the Pfaff is stronger. Keep either one well oiled and service and they will serve you well.

NM gal
NM gal
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In reply to plafollette
thumbsup 1 member likes this.


Date: 6/8/11 6:46 PM

There is a place that sells nothing but belts.... can't find it. If I can find it I'll post it.

ThePadre
ThePadre
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Pennsylvania USA
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In reply to plafollette


Date: 6/9/11 5:46 AM

Quote: plafollette
I have a Pfaff 130 and a Singer 15-91. I love them both. Granted if the internal cleated belt on the Pfaff 130 needs to be replaced they are next to impossible to find. I have seen them once in a while on ebay. On the Singer 15-91 with it being a direct drive, if the "fiber gear" strips or becomes useless you will not be able to find a replacement. My OSMG preferred Singer while his son (YSMG) leans toward the Pfaff 130. The motor on the Pfaff is stronger. Keep either one well oiled and service and they will serve you well.

If the Pfaff's belt and Singer's fiber gear are of concern, then I'd suggest either 1) a Singer 15-90 (belt-driven instead of potted motor/direct drive), 2) Singer 201-3 (likewise; but less common in the States), 3) the Singer 237 (Sew-Classic's review), or 3) a Kenmore made by Maruzen (158. prefix) from the late 60s - early 70s.

All of those machines use parts that are widely available, and will be for a very, very long time. The Kenmores have larger motors, typically 1.0 to 1.2A. None of this will cost anywhere near what a Pfaff 130 priced with any market awareness sells for. (Some folks here find them for $20, but I've never seen such a thing.) In contrast, Kenmores are common and quite inexpensive in my experience, and sturdily built, too. The only downside is that they won't fit in Singer cabinets.
SouthernStitch
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SouthernStitch  Friend of PR
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Date: 6/9/11 8:35 AM

The Pfaff 130 doesn't have a very high lift of the presser foot. This sort of limits the number of layers you can go through. It will however, go through about anything you can fit under there.

I did really like my Pfaff 130. It is true it went through tougher seams effortlessly (better than my Singer 201). However, I sold it because my Viking 6570 has a higher lift on the presser foot, and goes through as many layers just as effortless.

------
Bernina 780, and 530
Juki TL2010
Babylock Evolution
Singer 403a

When life gives you green velvet curtains, make a green velvet dress.

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