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Re-lining an ironing board cover
I need a thicker lining for my ironing board cover
Peter in NYC
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Peter in NYC
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Date: 4/29/10 10:16 AM

I bought a new ironing board cover about two weeks ago and the squishy foam lining has already flattened out to the point where, depending on what I'm ironing, the honeycomb pattern of the ironing board starts imprinting onto the fabric (especially with heavy steam)!

I want to re-line the cover and am wondering what I should do it with: cotton batting? lambswool?

Any ideas?

Thanks!

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You'll be in stitches at malepatternboldness.com!

LynnRowe
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In reply to Peter in NYC


Date: 4/29/10 10:22 AM

I use wool army blankets covered with 100% unbleached cotton muslin.

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I heart Panzy, Pfaff Creative Performance, the sewing machine love of my life!
And Baby (Enlighten serger), Victor (BLCS), Rupert (Pfaff 2023-knits expert) Ash (B350SE-Artwork), Kee (B750QEE-Panzy's BFF), Georgie (B560-Kee's baby sister) and the Feather-Flock!

Most of all, I heart Woo (HimmyCat). Until we meet again, my beautiful little boy. I love you.

Peter in NYC
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Date: 4/29/10 10:23 AM

Thanks!

So the muslin becomes the ironing board cover, or you put the ironing board cover over the muslin?
-- Edited on 4/29/10 10:24 AM --

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LynnRowe
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In reply to Peter in NYC


Date: 4/29/10 10:31 AM

Oops sorry; yep, the muslin becomes the cover. I use the store-bought cover as the pattern.

I don't use store-bought covers as they're usually the reflective types which just plain suck for sewers and are brutal to fabrics, or the store-boughts are treated fabrics.

The bonus to using unbleached cotton muslin; it's cheap! So it's cheap & easy to make a new one when the old one gets icky.

------
I heart Panzy, Pfaff Creative Performance, the sewing machine love of my life!
And Baby (Enlighten serger), Victor (BLCS), Rupert (Pfaff 2023-knits expert) Ash (B350SE-Artwork), Kee (B750QEE-Panzy's BFF), Georgie (B560-Kee's baby sister) and the Feather-Flock!

Most of all, I heart Woo (HimmyCat). Until we meet again, my beautiful little boy. I love you.

hazelnut
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In reply to LynnRowe


Date: 4/29/10 10:44 AM

This is the 2nd time I read that store-bought covers, esp. the teflon ones, are lousy for sewers. I have a teflon one and I'm wondering what makes it icky for sewing/pressing as opposed to just plain ironing. (I'm not sticking up for the teflon ones, I just don't know the difference and I guess ignorance has been bliss so far.)Thanks

Peter in NYC
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Peter in NYC
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Date: 4/29/10 10:48 AM

Actually, I'd be curious to know the answer to that one too.

I know mine is coated with something; not sure if it's teflon...

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hazelnut
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In reply to Peter in NYC


Date: 4/29/10 10:57 AM

Forgot to say that I'm glad you asked this since I'm having the same problem with the flattened out foam.

LynnRowe
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In reply to hazelnut


Date: 4/29/10 11:05 AM

Teflon covers reflect steam & heat back at the garment or fabric. This is not a good thing, as the fabric can actually get steam/heat-burn. The reflected steam & heat can be far above the temp you set your iron on! It also takes far longer for the fabric/garment to dry.

For shaping garments properly when sewing, you want fast steam and fast dry to lock in the shaping. With teflon/reflective covers, the steam & heat keep the fabric overly wet overly long and prevent proper shaping. The garment will sag out of shape because it's overly wet and takes so much longer to dry. Shine is also a common problem caused by using teflon covers.

If you have teflon/reflective covers...toss em out! They are not a sewer's friend. (And your fabric will thank you!)
-- Edited on 4/29/10 11:10 AM --

------
I heart Panzy, Pfaff Creative Performance, the sewing machine love of my life!
And Baby (Enlighten serger), Victor (BLCS), Rupert (Pfaff 2023-knits expert) Ash (B350SE-Artwork), Kee (B750QEE-Panzy's BFF), Georgie (B560-Kee's baby sister) and the Feather-Flock!

Most of all, I heart Woo (HimmyCat). Until we meet again, my beautiful little boy. I love you.

hazelnut
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Posts: 2310
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In reply to LynnRowe


Date: 4/29/10 11:20 AM

Thanks LynnRowe,
That all makes sense. I have noticed that spurted water would puddle and clothing I was ironing sometimes remained damp, but never made the connection between the teflon coating and why that was happening.

One more question if you don't mind...when you make your muslin cover do you reuse the binding with the string (I've never seen this sold) or do you sew on elastic all around?

ETA: Thanks Peter, for letting me "side-jack" your topic. We both learned something good today!
-- Edited on 4/29/10 11:27 AM --

LynnRowe
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In reply to hazelnut


Date: 4/29/10 11:27 AM

I make a casing and use cord with a fastner.

I did once try elastic, but the very nature of elastic, being...elastic...meant the cover wouldn't stay as snug as I wanted for any length of time.

For a quick fix, you can usually find 100% untreated cotton muslin iron board covers at sewing supply shops, Winners, Walmart, etc.

I don't see why you couldn't just cut out the cover part and reuse the cording around the old cover, if it was all still in good shape.

------
I heart Panzy, Pfaff Creative Performance, the sewing machine love of my life!
And Baby (Enlighten serger), Victor (BLCS), Rupert (Pfaff 2023-knits expert) Ash (B350SE-Artwork), Kee (B750QEE-Panzy's BFF), Georgie (B560-Kee's baby sister) and the Feather-Flock!

Most of all, I heart Woo (HimmyCat). Until we meet again, my beautiful little boy. I love you.

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