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Forum > Sewing Techniques and Tips > jacket vents ( Moderated by MissCelie)

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jacket vents
mitred?
petro
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petro  Friend of PR
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Date: 1/27/11 4:18 AM

Does anyone mitre the back vent corners in their jackets, and if so, how do you deal with the lining, especially the xtra length added for ease?

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Doris W. in TN
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In reply to petro


Date: 1/27/11 4:25 PM

This link, on Kathleen Fasanella's "Fashion Incubator" site, might be helpful.

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petro
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Date: 1/28/11 2:44 AM

Thanks Doris, I did have a look at that, but don't think its quite what I'm trying to do. When I've mitred the corner on the top piece (centre back panel of jacket), I've got the shell hem and its grown on facing piece in place, turned back onto the WS. Then, to attach the lining, I haven't found a good way of dealing with that 2cm or so of lining ease.
Normally, with a faced piece like the front, you can turn the hem up RS together, make a fold with the extra lining to tuck in it, and seam it down straight. Sigrid has a really clear tut. here
http://sigridsewingprojects.blogspot.com/2009/03/bagging-lining-where-front-facing-meets.html
But when the join is mitred, there's no vertical seam to tuck the little lining pleat into. The best I've done so far is to seam that 2cm lining bit RS tog, then turn it out and attach the lining to the hem by the usual bagging out method - but I'm not thrilled about this look and wondered if anyone has come across a really good method.

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Tom P
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In reply to petro


Date: 1/28/11 12:50 PM

Petro,

I've got quite a library of tailoring books, and they all recommend mitering the lap and sewing a simple seam for the underlap. As I'm sure you've found, you want the underlap to be just a bit shorter than the lap in the finished length (maybe 1/8 in or 1/2 cm or so) and it's easier to make that happen if you don't miter both.

All my books have the lining tacked down by hand at the miter. I've also found that the vent hangs better if the vertical SA from the miter to top of the vent is catchstitched to the fabric back, which would further complicate machine stitching. I frequently am changing the vents from the pattern, so I have to figure out what to do with the lining, anyway. Probably one of the main reasons I'm not faster when I sew :(.

I would think that to machine stitch all around the miter, you would also need to miter the lining (or at least fold the SAs under), then sew the lining like the inside of a patch pocket if you don't want the stitching to show. I think you can probably take out the 2cm of ease directly at the miter, and taper it into the hem seam. Better get the placement of lining on jacket right, though.

On the underlap side, you can machine stitch the lining much easier.

If it makes you feel any better, I had occasion to examine a Brooks Brothers suit jacket a thrift store a while back, and that sort of hand stitching was used on it, too.

petro
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Date: 1/28/11 5:18 PM

Thanks Tom, that's really helpful. I did think maybe the only solution to get a nice finish was to handstitch that back section, but kept looking at it and trying to puzzle out if there was a machined bagging out that would work. The idea of a mitre in the lining might, but it would be such a small piece. The last idea I tried to get my head round was tapering the stitching of the hem to the lining so that there was no ease at the side of the vent and 2 cms somewhere in the middle of the back panel, like lots of rtw coats do from a CF facing piece. A couple of possible problems come to mind with that idea - would it just look sloppy and the lining not lie flat, and would there be enough width across the back panel. If there's nothing in a whole bunch of tailoring books, I guess slip stitching the side where the lining piece attaches to the vent is the best solution that can be found.

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Tom P
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In reply to petro


Date: 1/29/11 11:36 AM

Petro,

Well, I'm not 100% sure that the tailoring books are exhaustive. Like most pattern instructions, it presents complications to show all the possible alternate ways to do something. For instance, Kathleen Fasanella's blog has a method to attach the bottom of the facing by machine that makes perfect sense, but isn't in any of the books. A lot of times, it's easiest to present the way that works in the largest number of cases.

As far as the hand stitching, I find that the hardest part of getting the lining finished around the vent by hand is doing the top part, and stitching along the side of the vent. You can still do both of those by machine, with a relatively few stitches to finish at the corner.

Tom

mamafitz
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mamafitz
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In reply to petro


Date: 1/29/11 2:15 PM

i miter the back vents, and i'm confused as to what you mean by deal with the extra length in the lining. i just bag as usual. i sometimes do the top seam by hand.

here is a picture of a back vent on a jacket i made for my son:
http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b319/mamafitz/joker8.jpg

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Girls do not dress for boys. They dress for themselves, and of course, each other. If girls dressed for boys, they’d just walk around naked at all times.
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petro
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Date: 1/31/11 3:41 AM

At the bottom of your picture where the lining is attached to the hem of the jacket shell there is a pleat, the extra length of the lining allowed for ease. How did you deal with this part?

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mamafitz
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In reply to petro


Date: 1/31/11 11:14 AM

i first stitched the lining to the vent, then bagged the lining to the hem. there is a hole in the seam that attaches the jacket/lining hems. i took another picture, hope that helps:
http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b319/mamafitz/ventlining.jpg

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Linda

Girls do not dress for boys. They dress for themselves, and of course, each other. If girls dressed for boys, they’d just walk around naked at all times.
-- Betsey Johnson


http://mamafitz.blogspot.com

petro
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Date: 1/31/11 1:44 PM

Oh that photo does explain it. I was looking for a way to have that lining attached without that little folded back piece. The one I just finished I seamed that tiny bit of lining up first so the turnings on it were inside, but I wasn't thrilled with this. It was fiddly to do, and looked a bit odd hanging down. I'll try it your way on the next one.

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