SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Forum > Pattern Modifications, Design Changes & Pattern Drafting > Very full upper arms

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
Very full upper arms
kiwi
kiwi
Advanced Beginner
NEW ZEALAND
Member since 11/1/02
Posts: 40
Send Message

      



Date: 1/23/05 2:21 AM

I am really struggling to adjust the sleeve width for my full upper arms.I am using the technique as described in FFRP on page169 .Even spreading the sleeve an inch does not give me the width I need in the upper arm .I am also distorting the sleeve cap so badly that when I lay it on my original pattern , it bears no resemblance to the original at all . I am using KwikSew 2966 cut in a medium ( matches my high bust) , and have made alterations for a broad back , long chest ( I am 5'9") ,and round shoulders.After having battled all day with this I am ready to chuck in garment sewing & go back to quilts !!But because I am so tall & big ( read overweight) , I am sick and tired of paying a fortune for clothes that do not fit properly .If a RTW garment fits on the arms , it is so big on the shoulders & bust that I am swimming in it.

Mandolin82
star
Mandolin82  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Washington USA
Member since 5/8/03
Posts: 1397
Send Message

      



Date: 1/23/05 10:56 AM

I'm not by my FFRP book but was reading it yesterday while I was doing my own large upper arm adjustments. One suggestion is to put a seam in the sleeve - they have a diagram and also an example with one of their real models who has very large upper arms. I haven't tried it, but it looks like a great idea. Plus that vertical line I think would be an attractive design element. Also, they say if you add more than 1 inch you may need to readjust the upper sleeve line: before you make your adjustment trace the curve of the upper sleeve from notch to notch; after you make your adjustment use the previously traced curve to reshape that curve.

Good luck - I spent much of the day yesterday on my sleeve alteration, partly because the original pattern had an error that I didn't discover until after I had done a heap of work.


Susan (also tall (5'10") with broad back and large upper arms
-- Edited on 1/23/05 11:59 AM --

Georgene
starstarstarstar
Georgene
Expert/Couture
California USA
Member since 10/5/02
Posts: 2292
Send Message

      
thumbsup 1 member likes this.



Date: 1/23/05 10:59 AM

Sleeve ease diagram: here's a diagram I attached to a discussion of the same subject, but I'll be darned if I can figure out where I posted it. It shows how to change the armhole and the sleeve for a full upper arm. I hope this helps and you get closer to the results you want.
-- Edited on 1/23/05 11:59 AM --

kiwi
kiwi
Advanced Beginner
NEW ZEALAND
Member since 11/1/02
Posts: 40
Send Message

      



Date: 1/23/05 11:27 AM

Thank you Susan & Georgene for your advice - I'm going to try both ways & see which works best .Susan - it's great to know there are others out there with the same body type as mine - sometimes I feel like a freak & that I am doomed to a life of floppy sleeves when I know that the more fitted ones can be flattering .

Ann B.
star
Ann B.  Friend of PR
Advanced Beginner
Massachusetts USA
Member since 4/20/02
Posts: 887
Send Message

      



Date: 1/23/05 2:55 PM

Georgene, why do you have to modify the back sleeve and back bodice? I'm going to print out your modification and tape it to my sewing room wall. I've tried all sorts of pattern alterations for this problem, and have not found one that works well yet.

~Ann

Georgene
starstarstarstar
Georgene
Expert/Couture
California USA
Member since 10/5/02
Posts: 2292
Send Message

      
thumbsup 1 member likes this.



Date: 1/23/05 3:24 PM

You are adding width to the entire sleeve down the middle. The addition needs to be distributed between front and back. Your armhole needs to be modified for your new sleeve cap shape. By addding at the curve of the armhole on the body, you are effectively adding ease. That way your sleeve width stays where you need it, at the top of your arm, instead of getting eaten by your armhole.
-- Edited on 1/23/05 4:24 PM --

Ann B.
star
Ann B.  Friend of PR
Advanced Beginner
Massachusetts USA
Member since 4/20/02
Posts: 887
Send Message

      



Date: 1/23/05 4:21 PM

Thank you so much. That makes perfect sense. I know so little about pattern design that sometimes I feel that fixing one problem just causes another. I really like your alteration, as you can keep the stitching line of the cap the same length, if not the shape of the original.

The Pivot Method gave me really oddly shaped and uncomfortable sleeves, and the method that you end up with a diamond window cannot give enough width without the sleeve cap being nearly flat.

Aain Georgene, thank you so much for your generous help.

~Ann

Georgene
starstarstarstar
Georgene
Expert/Couture
California USA
Member since 10/5/02
Posts: 2292
Send Message

      



In reply to Ann B.


Date: 1/23/05 5:07 PM

Ann, I hope it works out for you. When you asked the question "why?" I had to stop and think. It's not like I have a text book knowledge! The diagram is from "Fitting Solutions" from Taunton Press, that reprinted a lot of Q and A from Threads magazine. I had scanned and posted it to a question similar to yours about 6 months ago. In response to that particular query (which I can't find) it made perfect sense. Since the scan was already in my PR photo album I was able to post it for you.
It sounds like the solution you may be looking for as well. The title of the question in the book is "Sleeves that bind", as that person had trouble lifting their arms. That little add-on in the curve in the armhole is to add in the necessary ease for that problem. I'm guessing that may be part of your problem also, once you have corrected for your narrower shoulder and cross-chest.

KiwiWendy
starstarstar
KiwiWendy
Advanced
International AUSTRALIA
Member since 8/24/02
Posts: 3015
Send Message

      



Date: 1/23/05 6:54 PM

My arms are extremely heavy in the biceps area (and I only wish it was all muscle!). The most successful fit I get is from the singer sewing library "perfect fit" . I've tried a couple of other methods, and they didn't seem to suit the shape of my arm as well as this one.

I usually have to add between 1" - 1.5" to the biceps area of sleeves. Usually I am able to ease in the new the sleeve cap in without any hint to the unsuspecting public. Only once did I need to add 1/4" to the bodice back side seam - that's 1/4" at armscye tapering to zero at waist level.

In fact, if I ever say I have heavy arms, no-one believes me. BUT if I didn't make the alteration, immobilising sausage tight sleeves would be a dead give away.

------
Sydney, Australia

KiwiWendy
starstarstar
KiwiWendy
Advanced
International AUSTRALIA
Member since 8/24/02
Posts: 3015
Send Message

      



Date: 1/27/05 5:19 PM

Hi Kiwi,

I just realised that you're making the same KS shirt that I've made (and reviewed). I added unevenly to the front and back of the sleeve (1.5cm to the front & 2cm to the back), and added .5cm to the front and back bodice side seams.

I hope you get this shirt fitted the way you want ... I love the 3 I made late last year, and had the courage to toss the first version.

------
Sydney, Australia

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Pattern Modifications, Design Changes & Pattern Drafting >> Very full upper arms

Merchants on PR

Fitz Like a Glove Ironing Board Cover


Made In Australia
Deals!

Patterns from the Past


vintage sewing patterns
Deals!

Reconstructing History


Reconstructing History
Web site

Nature's Fabrics


Natural & Organic Fabrics
Deals!

Elliott Berman Textiles


Fabrics for Greater Ideas
Deals!

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Understanding Interfacings
Understanding Interfacings

Register

Beginners Guide to Dyeing Fabrics
Beginners Guide to Dyeing Fabrics

Register

Jamie Christina Miz Mozelle Dress Paper Pattern

Jamie Christina Miz Mozelle Dress Paper Pattern

Buy Now
You Sew Girl Beauty Case Pattern

You Sew Girl Beauty Case Pattern

Buy Now
Simplicity 1697

photo
by: Aurelie

Review

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.