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Job Search and Relocation
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Kim12469
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Kim12469
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Montana USA
Member since 3/27/08
Posts: 2399
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Date: 12/9/11 3:10 PM

I've never done this before. I've lived in the same state most of my life. I am seriously considering a relocation halfway across the country. At this point there is a slight chance I can convince my employer to let me work remotely but I'm not counting on it.

I have a timeframe that I want to move, preferably between June and August for school year reasons but I could fudge that a bit either way.

I am doing weekly or so searches for jobs that might fit me but I'm concerned about applying at this point. My plan was to comprise a list of companies that might have jobs for me when I was ready. I'm not sure if an employer wanted me out there that I could get out there very soon. It's hard though to see jobs that I think would fit, then not apply. I broke down and sent one today because it looked really great for me. I was up front with them on my preferred timeframe.

I don't want to move without a job in my new location but I might be able to if I had too. I have a ton of vacation so I could possibly manage to live there part time for a couple months with the way my schedule works. I have places to stay here as well. And worst case is that I temporarily move, do the vacation thing, and if absolutely necessary move back.

Anyone done this? Any suggestions?

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http://kimsewsilly.blogspot.com/

SexiSadi
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SexiSadi
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South Carolina USA
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In reply to Kim12469


Date: 12/9/11 3:24 PM

We did just that last November. We moved from Livonia to North Carolina. We love it here and we are so glad we moved.

A few things: First, are you not preparing for a divorce? Personally, I would square that all away before you decide to make a move. Don't just assume that a court will let you just up and take your kid out of the state, and you don't want to find out two months after you move that you have to return your child to your ex-husband. And I don't want to get all in your business, but even if he's telling you that you can take him with you, things change as a divorce moves closer.

Get your current house squared away too.

Moving: It's more of a headache and expensive then it is hard. I would advise having more cash then you currently have, as it's expensive. You'll need money. Finding a place is fairly easy as you just call a property manager for that. Oh, and you'll need money.

Job: I recommend finding a job first. They'll probably give you a month to give your current employer two weeks and another week or two to get to where ever you're going. I would not expect much more time then that. They only gave my husband three weeks before they wanted him to start.

Good luck!

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http://theramblingsoftcm.blogspot.com/
Numbers for 2013:
Yards in stash: 606.25
Yards in: 22.75
Yards out: 10.50

Numbers for 2012:
594.00 yards in stash
4 yards in
10.25 yards out

Numbers for 2011:
601.25 yards in stash (I'm sure this number is off by a few yards)
Yards in: 137.50 (Seriously? I'm over 100, and it's only JULY? Ugh!)
Yards out: 88.75

Kim12469
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Kim12469
Beginner
Montana USA
Member since 3/27/08
Posts: 2399
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In reply to SexiSadi


Date: 12/9/11 3:35 PM

Thanks! I am divorcing but my DS is from a previous relationship. His Dad and I are working that out which will be in writing before I do anything.

I have a place to live where I am going so luckily I don't have to worry about that either.

I was wondering how long an employer would give you. Part of me hopes that maybe if I found a good job, then I could pressure my current job into letting me work remotely. It's an easy thing, but they are just conservative.

Thanks

------
http://kimsewsilly.blogspot.com/

gramma b
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gramma b
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Date: 12/9/11 3:41 PM

You mention school, so kids? but if you are still young, go for it! And Mi. still had one of the worst economies. Check the states that are growing jobs and with lower costs of living/taxes and consider if you have/need supportive relatives nearby.

Looking back, I regret not being more adventuresome when I was single, where few of my fellow students left the state. Of course, that was graduating in the 60's, when women had less opportunities. Then I had to move a lot with H's transfers, which was not fun with small kids.
Don't rush, whatever is going on, but take your time with research and
connections guiding you, not emotions or the well-meaning opinions of others.

Kim12469
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Kim12469
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Montana USA
Member since 3/27/08
Posts: 2399
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In reply to gramma b


Date: 12/9/11 3:50 PM

I guess young is relative ;-)

My son is 9 and my feeling is that if I am going to do this I want to do it soon. I moved between 7th and 8th grade and it was horrible. I think moving is better while he is still in elementary school.

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http://kimsewsilly.blogspot.com/

Pinkytoo
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Pinkytoo
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Nevada USA
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In reply to Kim12469


Date: 12/9/11 4:07 PM

I've moved long-distance numerous times in the last 10 years, and I've done it both ways - got the job first, or moved before getting a job. Lately it seems like it's easier to move and get a job once you are settled. My son just moved to a town which shall remain nameless but is in a state that has one of the worst employment rates. He couldn't buy a job before he got there (late Sept.) but just got an interview 2 weeks ago for a good job, he starts next week. So if you have a place to stay, you may want to move first.

Also, when you are applying you need to specify in the cover letter that you and "your family" are "relocating to XYZ." You don't have to be specific that your family is you and your son and when you are relocating.

GOOD LUCK!
-- Edited on 12/9/11 7:46 PM --

------
Sewing is my therapy!

SexiSadi
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SexiSadi
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South Carolina USA
Member since 5/10/05
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In reply to Kim12469


Date: 12/9/11 4:16 PM

Quote: Kim12469

I was wondering how long an employer would give you. Part of me hopes that maybe if I found a good job, then I could pressure my current job into letting me work remotely. It's an easy thing, but they are just conservative.



Thanks

Well, i'm not a HR manager, so I can only give you my opinion. If a company is looking to hire someone, it's because they have a position to fill. It sounds logical to me that they would probably not give you longer then 30 days to start your new position.

Once you find a job, then you can present the remote option to your current employer. If your company has others that work remotely, they might let you too. While I know it could be the same as hanging yourself, would be possible for you to just ask if you could work remotely? Although, I can certainly see why you might not want to do that.

------
http://theramblingsoftcm.blogspot.com/
Numbers for 2013:
Yards in stash: 606.25
Yards in: 22.75
Yards out: 10.50

Numbers for 2012:
594.00 yards in stash
4 yards in
10.25 yards out

Numbers for 2011:
601.25 yards in stash (I'm sure this number is off by a few yards)
Yards in: 137.50 (Seriously? I'm over 100, and it's only JULY? Ugh!)
Yards out: 88.75

a7yrstitch
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a7yrstitch  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Texas USA
Member since 4/1/08
Posts: 6132
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In reply to Kim12469


Date: 12/9/11 6:15 PM

A couple of years ago, our older son decided to recircle his wagons and make a job change. He got tremendously more responses from the contact information that he used from his final destination than he did when he used our contact information here in Texas. He felt that HR managers would look at the contact information and try to rule out the potential for relocation expenses. I've heard this thought from others who are in a position to hire.

And, I suppose there is a case to be made in a tough economy about hiring locally if the position can be appropriately filled. You could try it both ways. The hiring process seems to be pretty lengthy now, but once someone has gone through the process, they expect and want the new employee on board quickly.

If you are ready to move and can pull it off, don't hesitate. We did this when our family was very young. The fall back at the time was that we could have survived with either one of us working or both of us working part time. With housing not being an immediate concern, you should have some breathing room. Just remember that you can be called in multiple times before you get a, 'yes'.

On timing your move. Starting with first grade, I was in 8 schools through 7th grade. It was really easier for me to make the change during the school year, which I did three times. You'll help him with the transition either way, but there was an advantage in getting to know the other youngsters before school was out for the summer.

I have a lot of teacher friends that mutter a lot about the problems with middle of the year school transfers but it could also help academically. Moving during the summer and being registered at the beginning of the year sometimes put me behind in classes that were not at the level that I had been working at and generally I had to plug through the first reporting period to prove myself and be put in the appropriate group or honors class. This was not as big of a problem for me when making the transition during the school year. I was also in the middle of five kids and had a demanding dad. Your attention will not need to be so divided when you are being proactive for your youngster.

Our younger son moved out of state at my suggestion, sort of. He was about to purchase a home in/near our home town when he set up his new business. I reminded him that he told me he could operate that business where ever he wanted and suggested that he purchase a home where his heart carried him. He moved to our family's favorite vacation destination of over 30 years. He loves it! And our oldest son flourishes in the big city, far from Texas.

When your future and the youngsters is secured, go for it. Best wishes.

------
I have no idea what Apple thought I was saying so be a Peach and credit anything bizarre to auto correct.

Michelle T

Michelle T
Intermediate
British Columbia CANADA
Member since 8/24/02
Posts: 4537
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Date: 12/9/11 7:11 PM

My employer just had a job competition. There were three applicants who were not local. One did not have the qualifications, so did not make the short list.

Another had a great resume, but lives in Ontario and the office is in BC. He did not indicate in his cover letter anything about relocating (time line etc). If he had indicated when he may be available (even if it would be in a few months) he would have been short listed.

The third applicant is in another country, not a citizen of Canada and we were only offering a temporary 1 year position. She had a great resume, but we could not get into immigration issues. She was not short listed.

I am currently applying for jobs a long ways from home. I am upfront in my cover letter that I would need 30 days to relocate. Now I have not got any responses yet, but I believe that I will eventually find the right position. In the new year I will be directly contacting the HR offices of a couple of the companies I am interested in apply at.

With some positions the hiring time line can be very long. My mother applied for and eventually got a a job, but it was over 6 months from her application until the job offer.

------
Proud parent of a Dwight International School Honour Roll Student

NM gal
NM gal
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Member since 5/27/09
Posts: 1175
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Date: 12/9/11 7:13 PM

We had a new job & move late in life 4 yrs ago. And it was a swift move... soo fast & sudden that we didn't have time to get our house ready to sell for 9 months. Two house payments, oh my. Sometimes getting the house squared away first doesn't cut it when a good opportunity knocks.

Everything people have posted here is right on... it's MORE expensive than you can plan for. Some places the utility fees for hook ups are expensive, not to mention the changes in car insurance. Lots of little details that pop up.

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