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Remember how there are no silly questions? Well . . .
Anne Onymus
Anne Onymus
Member since 12/22/11
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Date: 1/7/12 8:41 AM

Let's see if I can challenge that!

Why are we supposed to use interfacing? I think it's to steady the fabric but I don't see it in most of the clothes I've purchased. We do we use it but "they" don't?

rmusic1
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rmusic1
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Date: 1/7/12 8:53 AM

for me interfacing (as my dressmaking class tutor explained in class) is to be used for the following reasons:

help keep fabric with a loose weave together
help create definition and shape e.g. collars
it makes the piece of fabric stiffer for example when you are making a bag you don't want it to always be floppy
you may like the fabric, but not the qualities (drape etc) and interfacing can help change that

apart from the above it is also handy as a "second layer" when hand sewing hems so your stitches are less likely to show up on the outside (I made a coat where I interfaced the bottom strip near the hem for this reason).

You can see it in retail wear if you look carefully. Next time you have a shirt from a PJ, or an unlined jacket check the facings. They will probably have interfacing. Mine do at least.

Hope the above helps.

poorpigling

poorpigling
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In reply to Anne Onymus


Date: 1/7/12 8:58 AM


What rmusic said.. Btw. I love silly questions.. I feel it gives me a fifty fifty shot at knowing the answer..

poorpigling

poorpigling
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Date: 1/7/12 9:00 AM



This would also be a good place and time to point out its always best to know WHY you are doing something.. or using a particular product for many reasons.. Then you can determine when to use that product.. outside the box even.. or when to skip it sometimes.. Or when you can substitute other products for each other when you need too.. So see.. questions is not silly at all..

JTink
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JTink
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In reply to Anne Onymus


Date: 1/7/12 10:57 AM

I find it's always helpful when making button holes. Gives the fabric a bit more body. I use it in just about all my facings, to keep them from stretching. Also, I cut little strips and bond them around a V-neck or a round neck line, to keep them from stretching. I always use fusible, unless otherwise noted.

Michelle T

Michelle T
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Date: 1/7/12 11:09 AM

Remember that interfacing does not need to be a specially bought product. You can use self fabric, another layer of the main fabric as the interfacing. It really depends on what effect you want.

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jadamo00
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jadamo00
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In reply to Anne Onymus


Date: 1/7/12 11:19 AM

Look, it's a great flipping question. And looking at Ready to Wear has lead me to questions like: can I make a shirt WITHOUT putting interfacing in the collar? Sometimes, I WANT a shirt dollar with a little relax in it.

One of the reasons Off the Rack might be different from home sewing is that: it's more expensive and time-consuming for mass factories to add all the details that we do. The things we take the time to include are more often found in better or couture clothing.

But, you're doing the right thing: keep looking closely at store-bought clothes. Notice everything about it and see if you want to add things or cut corners in your own home sewing, like they do. I've also figured out faster and easier techniques by looking closely at off-the-rack. Ready-to-wear rarely uses hand sewing and it's nice to see how they put a garment together entirely by machine. You can try skipping steps like RTW does (like interfacing) and see what happens.

And, as mentioned before, you don't have to use INTERFACING as interfacing...you can use scrap fabric as long as it doesn't show through. For purses: I use plastic placemats or light doormats from the 99C store as stiffener or interfacing!

j.







-- Edited on 1/7/12 11:30 AM --

threaddy
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Date: 1/7/12 11:24 AM

Then there are of course thousands of interfacing's and stabilizers...good grief! Then I am the type who has to have one of each "on hand" sheeesh!

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"The problem is not that there are problems. The problem is expecting otherwise and thinking that having problems is a problem." Theodore Rubin
"Life isn't about finding yourself. Life's about creating yourself." George Bernard Shaw
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marec
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Date: 1/7/12 11:28 AM

Good question! I read somewhere...????....that interfacing is optional. I believe it was on the Islander website? I find some fusible interfacing to be far too much, and if I don't have nice fusible, I'll use fabric and do sew in interfacing. I have also been known to forego interfacing altogether and guess what? Nothing bad happened.

------
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Miss Fairchild
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Date: 1/7/12 12:19 PM

Okay, I'll chime in here. Interfacing is NOT optional, if you are going to have a collar, cuffs or a CF seam with buttons. The interfacing adds strength to the regular fabric, getting it to lie flat. Once I thought I could get away with not interfacing a collar--big, big mistake. The collar flopped around, didn't lie flat, and looked more like a ruffle. You can use different grades of interfacing, such as fusible tricot, lightweight, midrange and heavy weight, depending on what you are making. But to leave it out entirely is asking for trouble.

I'm using woven interfacing in the form of cotton muslin more these days over the fusible.

------
"Play the cards you are dealt, but choose who is sitting at the table"..AARP magazine

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