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Forum > Patterns and Notions > What to do with "Stitching Lines" of blouse tucks? ( Moderated by Sharon1952)

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What to do with "Stitching Lines" of blouse tucks?
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Alpinebixby
Alpinebixby
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Date: 2/28/12 6:57 PM

HI! I am making this pattern: Vintage Butterick 6921

As you can see, there are two fabric tucks on each side of the blouse front. The pattern has two four stitching lines and four tuck dots on each side of the front.

Instructions start like this:
Step 1 Front
To make tucks in FRONT on outside, bring stitching lines together, matching small dots. Stitch to within 3" of the lower edge. Press tucks away from center. Baste across upper edges.

QUESTION: Does this mean that one would fold the farthest outside tuck, then stitch on the edge closest to the midline; and then do the next tuck and then sew the edge of that tuck closest to the midline; resulting in two tucks, with outside edge open, but pleats secure as the medial edges are sewn closed--and the last stitch line (closest to midline on each side) is visible to the eye?

IF that is so, do you think that I could use this technique on a skirt I just made? I made a skirt made of twill with varying stripes, ON THE BIAS. Yes, I figured out that twill really doesn't hang the best on a bias cut skirt, so I am making one large center pleat to take up the wide-ness of the fabric, starting just above the crotch (is there a better term?). Like this Orvis Center Pleat Skirt So, the pleat would be made and the stitching line would be on the folded edge that is NOT VISIBLE to the eye, on the inside of the skirt. YES/NO? I don't think that the pleat will hold without stitching.

a7yrstitch
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In reply to Alpinebixby


Date: 2/28/12 8:54 PM

I'm wondering how the pleat in the bias cut twill would hold as far as the bias fabric stretching and the stitched area not stretching. I might be more inclined to tuck in a soft fold on either side of the waist about where you would normally see darts.

You could try pinning in the center pleat that you want to achieve and hang it on a hanger for a couple of days to study what happens to it. Try it on that way too and see if you like how the pleat moves. If you do stitch up a center front pleat, I wonder if you should use a stitch that will stretch to keep up with the bias cut of the fabric as it is worn, washed and dried.

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Miss Fairchild
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In reply to Alpinebixby


Date: 2/28/12 8:59 PM

You're going to make a fold by matching the dots, which are marked on the wrong side. The fold is going to appear on the outside, not the inside. Then you take the folded edge and press that toward the armscye. Then do the same again, with the next group of dots. What's going to hold these tucks down is the shoulder seam.

With your skirt, the opposite is done because the folds are going to face the center, rather than away from it.

To get a visual of what I'm saying, take a piece of fabric and make two folds in it. Taking the folds, make them point toward the outside edges; the center of the fabric is going to be flat and one thickness. This is what you are doing with your blouse. Then make the folds meet in the center; this is what you're doing with your skirt.


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Alpinebixby
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In reply to Miss Fairchild


Date: 2/28/12 9:32 PM

Thanks for the input. Can I ask why they call the line the pleats are folded on (the vertical lines) the "Stitching Lines," if no stitching is done on them? Confusing.

I see that there is also the basting stitch along the top shoulder and then also the sewing line along the top shoulder which will hold the top of the pleats together.

Alpinebixby
Alpinebixby
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In reply to a7yrstitch


Date: 2/28/12 9:37 PM

Thanks for your insight! Very good point. I may just have to skip the center pleat and take in the sides, but now my heart is absolutely set on a large center pleat.

I really didn't want to do hemline pleats so as to not accentuate bulk in that area. I also wanted the challenge of doing this lower starting point for a midline pleat. It's a pretty pleat, isn't it? (From the Orivis picture.)

I may be out of my depth, however. I am not quite sure how to smooth out the top edge of the pleat starting point, since the pattern did not call for this; and how it will stay pleated in that "kick area."

Just garnering more experience under my belt. . . .

NancyZL
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In reply to Alpinebixby


Date: 2/28/12 10:10 PM

From what I can tell on the Orvis skirt the pleat may be the type that
starts well below the waist & uses a separate panel behind the pleat. It is very easy to do & results in a flat non-bulky pleat & was very popular in the 60s I'm thinking in A-line skirts. The panel or wide stripe of fabric is stitched on both sides of the pleat . I can look for an old pattern of mine tomorrow.
I probably have you confused now, sorry.
Okay, found what I meant : "Inverted pleat with a separate underlay"
on the Burda site. Hope this helps.
-- Edited on 2/28/12 10:19 PM --
Opps, almost forgot the blouse pleat question. The stitching line does mean that it is "stitched" and then pressed to the side. One needs the stitching to hold the pleat. Sometimes in addition the pleat is topstitched on the right side to reinforce the
vertical design when you have several pleats but here it doesn't appear to be part of the design.

-- Edited on 2/28/12 10:26 PM --
-- Edited on 2/28/12 10:32 PM --

Miss Fairchild
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In reply to Alpinebixby


Date: 2/29/12 8:52 PM

Quote:
Can I ask why they call the line the pleats are folded on (the vertical lines) the "Stitching Lines," if no stitching is done on them?
Because, even not having a copy of the directions to read from, you are going to stitch these down vertically so they stay in place. Kind of like top stitching, and very close to the fold.

Quote:
I see that there is also the basting stitch along the top shoulder and then also the sewing line along the top shoulder which will hold the top of the pleats together.
Yes, this is true. The basting is done at 4/8" and the sewing is done at 5/8". The reason being is so that the basting is close enough to sewing line to hold the basting in place.

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a7yrstitch
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In reply to Alpinebixby


Date: 2/29/12 11:54 PM

Since the initial need for the pleat was to take the skirt in (I think), I'm confused about starting the pleat lower on the front. I was envisioning something like the pleat on this Orvis garment:
Colorful Stretch Denim Skirt
with the exception being that the pleat would be stitched closed down to the point where it opens up on the
Orvis Center Pleat Skirt
that you like.

On your bias skirt, are you planning to take it in to make it narrower along the entire length of the skirt,
or,
were you planning on using the pleat to just remove some of the fullness from the lower 2/3's to 3/4's of the skirt?

How does it fit through the waist and upper hip as is?

Does this help?
Adding a Center Front Inverted Pleat, Adelaide, Pretty Sweet

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Alpinebixby
Alpinebixby
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In reply to NancyZL


Date: 3/2/12 1:45 AM

OMG, cool! I found the Burda Technique here.

Thanks for that. It makes sense for a center pleat in a skirt, so it holds its shape.

Also, thanks everyone for the comments on the shirt pleating. I think I get it now.

Alpinebixby
Alpinebixby
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In reply to a7yrstitch


Date: 3/2/12 1:51 AM

Oh, that is a great tutorial, too. Thanks so much.

My objective was to pull in the fullness in the lower portion of the skirt. It does look like it would be the best to start at the top in this instance, though. I am going to try it on and see if there is any wiggle room for that.

Unfortunately, this is the second time I made this skirt (first with thin soft cotton), which allowed me to custom fit the waist and hips on this second version-with the new problem of wideness on the lower portion due to twill on the bias.

I hope I figure out how to make this a killer skirt. I will post a photo and you all will be so proud of yourselves!

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