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Message Board > Men Who Sew > Frugal or cheap? ( Moderated by CarolynGM, Deepika)

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Frugal or cheap?
How to conserve patterns.
Mike Schoppe
Mike Schoppe
Beginner
ID USA
Member since 2/15/12
Posts: 8
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thumbsup 1 member likes this.
Date: 4/10/12 11:35 PM

When I first took an interest in sewing, it was over my mother's shoulder. I asked so many questions, I think she grew a bit weary. One thing she would do is to mark the cut lines using straight pins. Then she would push the pin all the way to the head and pop the head through the tissue. After removing the tissue, she would cut along the line of pins. I had been using that method until Lori, the floor manager at my local Hancock Fabric, suggested a more durable pattern transfer material. It's more like an interface. So far I've always found it with all the other interface materials.

Now I take the time to trace the size I want to the pattern transfer material. So I never cut the pattern sheets. From the ads that I've seen for vintage patterns, the price is higher for uncut patterns. With the cost of some of the new patterns I want, I can't justify cutting them. I'm paying $2.50(US) a yard for the pattern transfer material. That cost I can justify for keeping the pattern intact.

Unfortunately, I've gotten some comments about how unnecessary this practice is. Laughably, the strongest comments I got were from pattern manufacturers. I can understand where my practice would bother them. I suppose they would like us to cut up the tissue for the size desired. Then if a different size is needed, a new pattern must be purchased. And if that's not enough, most patterns that I've seen do not include all sizes. I have had to buy multiple sizes of the same pattern on a few occasions.

I suppose that's about all I can squeeze out for now.

Mike

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It's easier to drive in a straight line.

wenznz
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wenznz  Friend of PR
Advanced Beginner
NEW ZEALAND
Member since 7/8/11
Posts: 343
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Date: 4/10/12 11:44 PM

I do the same thing. I purchase a product sold as EziTrace interfacing, and trace all mine off.

Admittedly, I am using mostly independents and Jalie's at the moment which are not going anywhere near my scissors, but have traced out the few others I've used lately too.

I'm still getting a feel for pattern sizing, and don't want to cut the pattern tissue, only to discover I cut the wrong size!
-- Edited on 4/10/12 11:47 PM --

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Wendy
Wellington, New Zealand

sewme47
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sewme47
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IL USA
Member since 8/28/08
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Date: 4/11/12 0:08 AM

Hello Mike....it's always nice to see a guy who sews join the fun on PR.

Lots of people trace their patterns, and everyone has their favorite method. I use tissue paper that I buy by the roll from Nancy's notions, because it's easy to use and pretty cheap. I trace all my Vogue and indie patterns and, of course, anything from a pattern magazine like Burda or Ottobre (are you familiar with them?) I don't bother to trace 99 patterns!

I've never heard of your mother's method for marking & cutting. I would worry about accuracy, but if it works for you, great! What brands of patterns are you using and what do you like to sew?
Oops...just realized this the "Men who sew" area. Hope it's ok I chimed in!
Laura
-- Edited on 4/11/12 0:17 AM --

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A balanced diet is a cupcake in each hand.

tourist
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tourist  Friend of PR
Intermediate
BC CANADA
Member since 7/23/07
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In reply to Mike Schoppe <<


Date: 4/11/12 0:57 AM

Totally a pattern tracer here. I do lots of alterations and playing around with customization, so it doesn't make sense to cut up the originals. I use plastic tablecloths and some other heavier mil plastic that I get from other projects.

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http://bgballroom.wordpress.com to follow the progress on my next ballgown.

a7yrstitch
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a7yrstitch  Friend of PR
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TX USA
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In reply to Mike Schoppe <<


Date: 4/11/12 0:59 AM

I spent many hours sewing with my youngest son standing on the back of my chair and leaning over my shoulders watching me sew. Your post makes me smile to think about it.

The vintage pattern pricing has given me pause to consider being more careful with some of the designer patterns. But I'm sure that I'll continue to cut at least 95% of the patterns that I use. I treat them kindly and use my patterns multiple times with no problems.

I use a combination of pins and weights (canned food) and once I have cut into the pattern the first time I do not cut off additional paper on subsequent uses.

In the end, many sewing room practices are about personal preference and whatever makes your environment a happier place to work and create. I make pastry the way my mother and grandmother made it. Perhaps there is a 'better' way, but I'm happy with the little time warp that surrounds me with the continuity of the process.

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I have no idea what Apple thought I was saying so be a Peach and credit anything bizarre to auto correct.

heathergwo
heathergwo  Friend of PR
Advanced Beginner
CA USA
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Date: 4/11/12 1:13 AM

Since I mostly use the Big 4 and hardly any Vogue patterns AND I usually cut the biggest size in the patter, I have never had to trace a pattern. It sounds so time consuming! HOWEVER, if I had a really nice, expensive pattern that I didn't want to ruin, I can totally see doing that! But not for the Big 4 when they are always on sale... it's just too much work for that price!

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Brother Innovis 1250D
Babylock Enlighten
Singer Curvy 8763
Brother 1034D
Janome 385.19606
Brother 2340CV

tinflutterby
tinflutterby  Friend of PR
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CA USA
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Date: 4/11/12 2:12 AM

Hi Mike,
My practice with regards to tracing depends on the pattern. I can't remember the last time I paid full price for a big 4 pattern so that isn't an issue. I sew for 5 grown daughters so if I think a pattern will only work for one I will use it but trace if I want to use it for another. For myself I have massive alterations for most patterns and trace in case I get it wrong the first time, (reconstructing a pattern is a pain). Many times I trace because I need right and left to position the fabric motif on the garment or because I don't really have enough. So it's all depending on the need.

petro
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petro  Friend of PR
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FRANCE
Member since 6/24/07
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Date: 4/11/12 2:53 AM

The price for vintage patterns is high at the moment, but it occurs to me that not so long ago old patterns were considered worthless. So, I'm not going to trace mine in the hope that ten or twenty years down the line they may fetch a bomb as 'vintage'.



Member since 12/31/69
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thumbsup 1 member likes this.
Date: 4/11/12 3:08 AM

I cut everything, even my vintage and go on with it. I enjoy them, I'm the one using them and I don't plan on making money off of them.

I trace when they get too fragile. Everyone has what they like to do and do what makes you happy.

jadamo00
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jadamo00
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NY USA
Member since 3/13/06
Posts: 1264
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thumbsup 1 member likes this.
Date: 4/11/12 8:10 AM

Your mom's method makes me a little itchy because I'm picturing my scissors hitting a pin every 3 inches

I used to buy clear plastic dropcloths at the 99 cents store. But then I tried clear plastic tablecloths (from the 99 cents store) and the plastic is a few mils thicker. Nicer!

So I trace off them with a Sharpie.

Benefits: Your pattern pieces are crystal clear: per-fect for positioning the patterns on plaid, stripes, or other challenging fabric prints (so the tiger's head doesn't wind up on your crotch...)

Flexible, thin plastic pattern pieces are better than tissue for pinning together to try on the pattern.

Plastic pattern pieces fold flat and unfold flat! I fold a piece of typing paper in half, stick the plastic pattern in there, make notes on the paper. Then everything (the pattern envelope, the plastic pieces, swatches, reference photos, etc.) gets popped into a clear COMIC BOOK COVER/BAG/PROTECTOR: perfectly sized for standard pattern envelopes, clear, durable, and cheeeeep!

I never muslin, but when I make changes on a garment, I use different colored Sharpies to mark changes on my plastic pattern pieces.

j.











-- Edited on 4/11/12 8:29 PM --

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