Sewing Patterns, Pattern Review, Sewing Classes, Sewing Machines and Sewing Machine Reviews!
Platinum Sponsor: Stylish Fabric
Over 20,000 of high quality reorderable fabric

[SIGNUP - FREE Membership & 1 FREE Sewing Lesson ]
[Sewing Classes|Shopping Bag Your Shopping Bag|Login|Help]
Sewing Review and Pattern Reviews Sewing Knowledge Base Sewing Patterns Sewing Classes & Sewing Lessons Sewing Machine & Embroidery Machinery Sewing Message Boards Sewing merchants Blog Help/FAQ About Pattern Review
Enter your e-mail address:




Advanced Search
Tags
New to PR?
Sewing Machines
Compare Sewing Machines
Sewing Machine & Serger Reviews
Embroidery Machines
Sewing Reviews
Sewing Patterns
Review Gallery
Sewing Books
Sewing Supplies
Sewing Websites
Sewing Stores
Sewing Class Reviews
Sewing Expo Reviews
Sewing Tips & Techniques
Sewing Podcasts
NEW!Fabric Glossary
Sewing Review Requests Add a Review Request
Your Account
Edit Profile
My Page
Favorites
Wish List
Pattern Catalog
Notifications
Friends of PR
Join Friends of PR
Find a member
Deal Corner
Photo Album
Calendar
Chat Room
Chat Schedule
Chat Transcripts
Sewing Classifieds
Add a Classified
Sewing Contests
enter contest
contest report
contest gallery
Favorite Links
reviews with comments
merchant gallery
article archive
newsletter archive
Craft Resources
contact info
shipping rates
returns & refunds
testimonials

Platinum Sponsor - Stylish Fabric
Stylish Fabric
You are not logged in. Login here.



Message Board > Beginner's Forum > To interface or not to interface, ( Moderated by EleanorSews)

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
To interface or not to interface,
that is the question....
LDT2011
LDT2011
Intermediate
UNITED KINGDOM
Member since 11/18/11
Posts: 637
Login to reply to this post

Date: 5/31/12 7:21 AM

To interface or not to interface that is the question....
I find modern patterns seem to want to interface everything and the vintage ones I have don't. When I do interface things like facings I find them too stiff for my liking.
I'm planning on making a shirtdress and it seems to want you to interface quite a bit.
So do I follow the instructions and interface or not?

------
'The purpose of most fashion is to be ostentatiously non-functional.'

eclair
eclair
Intermediate
NEW ZEALAND
Member since 7/18/07
Posts: 13
Login to reply to this post

In reply to LDT2011 <<


Date: 5/31/12 7:44 AM

I find the interfacing really helps with getting things to lie flat or to keep their shape where necessary. And remember that not all interfacing has to be stiff. I've been using different interfacings of varying stiffness for collars, plackets, cuffs etcetera. It's also worth attaching a sample of the interfacing to a piece of your fabric and tossing it in the washing machine (assuming that's how you'll be cleaning your dress) as they are very often much less stiff once they've been through the laundry once or twice.

Use a lightweight interfacing for starters. It would probably do the job nicely for a shirtdress unless it has a particularly stiff or fancy collar.

Miss Fairchild
starstarstarstar
Miss Fairchild  Friend of PR
Advanced
USA
Member since 8/24/02
Posts: 7936
Login to reply to this post

In reply to LDT2011 <<
thumbsup 2 members like this.


Date: 5/31/12 8:48 AM

Why not use what you call "calico" to interface? It's drapey, not stiff and will help hold the shape of the garment.

------
"Play the cards you are dealt, but choose who is sitting at the table"..AARP magazine

SEE MY ETSY SHOP HERE: http://www.etsy.com/shop/AuntMaymesAttic
My blog: http://auntmaymesattic.wordpress.com/

marec
starstarstarstar
marec  Friend of PR
Intermediate
OR USA
Member since 5/11/08
Posts: 3997
Login to reply to this post

In reply to LDT2011 <<


Date: 5/31/12 11:45 AM

You could start with a lightweight interfacing, and double it if you need more stiffness. For your shirtdress, you'll need interfacing behind the buttonholes and the placket. The dress will look better with a crisper interfacing along the placket. Try some samples of fusible and sew in...oh, and I have started using sew in on facings as I think it looks better there than fusible. Good discussion!

------
my blog: http://kf-biblioblog.blogspot.com/
Sewing through my pattern stash-145
completed.

LDT2011
LDT2011
Intermediate
UNITED KINGDOM
Member since 11/18/11
Posts: 637
Login to reply to this post

In reply to marec <<


Date: 5/31/12 1:25 PM

Quote: marec
You could start with a lightweight interfacing, and double it if you need more stiffness. For your shirtdress, you'll need interfacing behind the buttonholes and the placket. The dress will look better with a crisper interfacing along the placket. Try some samples of fusible and sew in...oh, and I have started using sew in on facings as I think it looks better there than fusible. Good discussion!

i have used lightweight before and thats the one i find to stiff. is there a lighter lightweight? so light u wouldn't know its there.
I don't understand what the placket is for...a normal shirt doesn't have one...well not the ones ive sewn?

------
'The purpose of most fashion is to be ostentatiously non-functional.'

stirwatersblue
star
stirwatersblue
Intermediate
KS USA
Member since 12/13/08
Posts: 3072
Login to reply to this post

Date: 5/31/12 2:29 PM

The button placket is the strip down the front of a shirt/blouse/dress/etc where the buttons and buttonholes are set, and you want that to have some body so it doesn't wrinkle or flop around there:



I'm not sure what you mean when you say "a normal shirt" doesn't have them...? Where are you putting your buttons, then?

The lightweight interfacing I use is seriously lightweight--the best comparison I have is to a used fabric softener dryer sheet. It's softer than tissue, very thin and airy. I just used it to add the teensiest bit of body to the waistband on some pj pants, and it's almost imperceptible (ideally, I'd have used something a hair stiffer, but this was handy).
-- Edited on 5/31/12 2:31 PM --

------
~Gem in the prairie

JTink
star
JTink
Intermediate
VA USA
Member since 4/20/08
Posts: 5726
online now
Login to reply to this post

In reply to LDT2011 <<


Date: 5/31/12 3:05 PM

There is a "featherweight" iron on interfacing. I use it a lot. I like to interface my facings, waist bands and button plackets.

beginagain
star
beginagain  Friend of PR
Intermediate
KY USA
Member since 10/30/06
Posts: 282
Login to reply to this post

In reply to stirwatersblue <<


Date: 5/31/12 3:10 PM

A shirt without a collar band usually doesn't have a placket. I like wing collars and they use facings.

------
If you wait for the perfect time to start, you'll never start.

marec
starstarstarstar
marec  Friend of PR
Intermediate
OR USA
Member since 5/11/08
Posts: 3997
Login to reply to this post

In reply to LDT2011 <<


Date: 6/1/12 1:21 AM

Quote:
i have used lightweight before and thats the one i find to stiff. is there a lighter lightweight? so light u wouldn't know its there. I don't understand what the placket is for...a normal shirt doesn't have one...well not the ones ive sewn?


Try a fusible that is featherweight, and double it if needed. The interfacing will be limp and give just the smallest amount of strength to the placket etc. Pam, from Off The Cuff blog sells some great interfacing.

The placket can be visible or not, depending upon the style of shirt/shirtdress. I like the sporty look you get with the visible placket. It provides strength and reinforcement to the buttons on the shirt or shirtdress. Some blouses don't use a visible placket, but just have a facing. In that case, I would add some squares of interfacing to the buttons and buttonholes.

------
my blog: http://kf-biblioblog.blogspot.com/
Sewing through my pattern stash-145
completed.

LDT2011
LDT2011
Intermediate
UNITED KINGDOM
Member since 11/18/11
Posts: 637
Login to reply to this post

In reply to beginagain <<


Date: 6/1/12 4:45 AM

Quote: beginagain
A shirt without a collar band usually doesn't have a placket. I like wing collars and they use facings.

The two shirts I've sewn have been like that. Hense why I've not done a placket before.

------
'The purpose of most fashion is to be ostentatiously non-functional.'

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Beginner's Forum >> To interface or not to interface,

Merchants on PR
SewBaby
Unique Sewing Patterns
Deals!
Budo Bear Designs
Asian Designs
Web site
Patterns from the Past
vintage sewing patterns
Deals!
Elliott Berman Textiles
Fabrics for Greater Ideas
Deals!
Gwyn Hug
Fabric Shopping Help!
Deals!

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.
Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Contact Us
Online Sewing Classes
Altering Jackets
Fee: $19.99
(Regular $59.00)
Altering Jackets

Online Sewing Classes
Fit the Tee to a T
Fee: $29.00
(Regular $49.00)
Fit the Tee to a T

Butterick 4443 Dress
photo
Review by fourkid on 8/7/11
Read Review

McCalls 3693 Pattern( Size ONE SIZE )
McCalls 3693 Pattern( Size ONE SIZE )

Details
Price: $13.95
Add to Bag Add to Bag

McCalls 6890 Pattern ( Size LRG-XLG-XXL )
McCalls 6890 Pattern ( Size LRG-XLG-XXL )

Details
Price: $18.95
Add to Bag Add to Bag

New Look 6894 Misses Blouses
photo
Review by LM2HYD on 1/16/12
Read Review

Oliver S Roller Skate Dress and Tunic Digital Pattern ( Size 6m-4T )
Oliver   S Roller Skate Dress and Tunic Digital Pattern ( Size 6m-4T )

Details
Price: $15.95
Add to Bag Add to Bag

You Sew Girl Fabulous Fifties Bib Digital Pattern
You Sew Girl Fabulous Fifties Bib Digital Pattern

Details
Price: $6.95
Add to Bag Add to Bag

Jamie Christina Miz Mozelle Dress Pattern (JC313MD)
Jamie Christina Miz Mozelle Dress Pattern (JC313MD)

Details
Price: $14.95
Add to Bag Add to Bag

Favorite Things Ballet Slippers Pattern
Favorite Things Ballet Slippers Pattern

Details
Price: $14.00
Add to Bag Add to Bag

Subscribe to PR Message Board Feed Subscribe to the PR Message Board Feed Add to My Yahoo! Subscribe at NewsGator Online Subscribe at Bloglines Add to MyMSN