SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Platinum Sponsor
Fabulous Fit
Fabulous Fit

Forum > Beginner's Forum > Piping cord for swimwear ( Moderated by EleanorSews)

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
Piping cord for swimwear
yttri
yttri
Minnesota USA
Member since 3/25/12
Posts: 116
Skill: Advanced Beginner
Body Type:
Send Message

      



Date: 7/15/12 2:56 AM

I found this cute swim suit via Pintrest, which coincided with my desire to sew swimwear. Regarding piping for swimsuits, I don't think cotton cording would be appropriate but am unsure what would be a good substitute resistant to salt or chlorine. What recommendations do you guys have?


-- Edited on 7/15/12 2:57 AM --

------
-----8<---------------------
www.ladybasecamp.com

treefrog
starstarstarstar
treefrog
Australia
Member since 2/13/08
Posts: 2151
Skill: Advanced
Send Message

                                                     1 Replies



Date: 7/16/12 3:13 AM

Nice swimsuit.

Polyester or polypropaline cording would probably be the best. The polyester tends to stand up better to chlorine and absorbs less water than nylon.

If you just want very fine piping, you could make the piping with another type of cord and then pull the cord out after you have sewn the seams. I've found this useful with sports gear when the piping cord doesn't stretch and you really need it to.

Good luck, let us know how you go.

------
It's the journey, not the destination that counts
https://sewtreefrog.wordpress.com

SheBear0320
starstar
SheBear0320  Friend of PR
Manitoba Canada
Member since 4/8/08
Posts: 5392
Skill: Advanced
Send Message

                                                     1 Replies



In reply to treefrog

Date: 7/16/12 10:02 AM

This is what I do -- just use regular piping cord and once I have it sewn into the seam, I pull out the cord and just leave the fabric as the piping.

As treefrog pointed out, you don't lose the stretch of your fabric this way.

Good luck with your project.

------
Sheila
"sewing very slowly to fill an empty closet"
Stash Tally: net +38.5 yds (2014)
2015 Stash Tally: 106.5 yds out/122.875 yds in (net +16.375 yds)

2016 Stash Busting:
28.375 yds sewn (as of 07/09/16)
14.25 yds purchased (as of 07/09/16)

yttri
yttri
Minnesota USA
Member since 3/25/12
Posts: 116
Skill: Advanced Beginner
Body Type:
Send Message

                                                     1 Replies



In reply to SheBear0320

Date: 7/16/12 2:09 PM

Thanks SheBear0320 and Treefrog! I completely forgot about maintaining the stretch if I used piping cord. I like the idea of using cord and pulling it out afterwards.

------
-----8<---------------------
www.ladybasecamp.com

CM_Sews
CM_Sews
USA
Member since 9/18/04
Posts: 2046
Skill: Intermediate
Send Message

                                                     2 Replies



In reply to yttri

Date: 7/16/12 5:08 PM

Quote: yttri
Thanks SheBear0320 and Treefrog! I completely forgot about maintaining the stretch if I used piping cord. I like the idea of using cord and pulling it out afterwards.

If you want to ultimately remove the cord, another option is to not use cord at all; just insert a folded strip of fabric as you sew the seam.

For example, if your seam allowance is 5/8-inches, a strip of fabric 1 1/2-inches (5/8 + 1/8 = 3/4; 3/4 x 2 = 1 1/2) wide, folded wrong sides together, can be inserted between the two pattern pieces at the seam edge of the pattern pieces, stitched at 5//8-inch, and that will expose a 1/8-inch fold on the outside of the garment in the seam.

CMC
yttri
yttri
Minnesota USA
Member since 3/25/12
Posts: 116
Skill: Advanced Beginner
Body Type:
Send Message

                                                     1 Replies



In reply to CM_Sews

Date: 7/17/12 10:29 AM

That works as well? I might try it since I have no piping cord at all and was planning on getting some. Thanks, CM_Sews!

------
-----8<---------------------
www.ladybasecamp.com

SheBear0320
starstar
SheBear0320  Friend of PR
Manitoba Canada
Member since 4/8/08
Posts: 5392
Skill: Advanced
Send Message

                                                     1 Replies



In reply to yttri

Date: 7/17/12 1:30 PM

The method CM_Sews outlined will also work -- it may be a little harder to keep even/straight for those trying it for the first time. Be sure to do several samples.

I tend to use the piping cord method when I'm going around curved seams or edges to help with keeping it straight and even. When doing straight lines, I will often not use the piping cord.

------
Sheila
"sewing very slowly to fill an empty closet"
Stash Tally: net +38.5 yds (2014)
2015 Stash Tally: 106.5 yds out/122.875 yds in (net +16.375 yds)

2016 Stash Busting:
28.375 yds sewn (as of 07/09/16)
14.25 yds purchased (as of 07/09/16)

CM_Sews
CM_Sews
USA
Member since 9/18/04
Posts: 2046
Skill: Intermediate
Send Message

                                                     1 Replies



In reply to SheBear0320

Date: 7/17/12 4:18 PM

Sheila, that's a great idea to use cord on the curves, and then remove it.

If you are ultimately going to remove the cord, consider using yarn or string or some other type of cordage to "fill out" the piping until you remove it. There's no need to get special piping cord if you are going to ultimately remove it.

I have started to make piping for garments with inexpensive polyester yarn as the filler. I picked a yarn that was thick enough to give me a nice sized piping for garments. I think it's just a standard 4-strand craft yarn from Hancocks or Joanns. Works great, doesn't shrink, and the skein probably cost me about $3. Yarn comes in a variety sizes, and you may already have some yarn or string that you can use as temporary piping filler.

CMC
SheBear0320
starstar
SheBear0320  Friend of PR
Manitoba Canada
Member since 4/8/08
Posts: 5392
Skill: Advanced
Send Message

      



In reply to CM_Sews

Date: 7/17/12 7:42 PM

I use whatever works for the purpose depending on the look I am going for. Sometimes it's cord, other times yarn and sometime jute -- I also have some different sizes of welting from my home dec sewing days.



------
Sheila
"sewing very slowly to fill an empty closet"
Stash Tally: net +38.5 yds (2014)
2015 Stash Tally: 106.5 yds out/122.875 yds in (net +16.375 yds)

2016 Stash Busting:
28.375 yds sewn (as of 07/09/16)
14.25 yds purchased (as of 07/09/16)

yttri
yttri
Minnesota USA
Member since 3/25/12
Posts: 116
Skill: Advanced Beginner
Body Type:
Send Message

                                                     1 Replies



Date: 7/18/12 0:50 AM

great tip! that makes a lot more sense economically. i do have some yarn laying about too.

one more question, do you make one very long length of piping for everything and trim as much as you need as you go along, or sew one separate length of piping for each section?

------
-----8<---------------------
www.ladybasecamp.com

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Beginner's Forum >> Piping cord for swimwear

Merchants on PR

Nature's Fabrics


Natural & Organic Fabrics
Deals!

Elliott Berman Textiles


Fabrics for Greater Ideas
Web site

O! Jolly! Shop


Sweater Knit Fabrics
Web site

Amulet Swim Fabrics


Poly/PBT swimwear fabric
Web site

Swim Style Patterns


Swimwear Gymwear Patterns
Web site

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Online Class
Beginners Guide to Dyeing Fabrics
Beginners Guide to Dyeing Fabrics

Class Details

Online Class
Altering Pants
Altering Pants

Class Details

Other 00/0000

photo
by: gautrann

Review
Jamie Christina Lark Paper Pattern

Jamie Christina Lark Paper Pattern

Pattern Details
SewBaby Patchwork Purse Pattern

SewBaby Patchwork Purse Pattern

Pattern Details
No Pattern Used Absolutely A-Line by Wend

photo
by: Deballan

Review

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2016 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.