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sew-in interfacing
Calendria
Calendria
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Date: 7/23/12 4:05 PM

what do you guys like to use for sew in interfacing? the same fabric? something different?

heathergwo
heathergwo
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Date: 7/23/12 10:05 PM

Depends on the project! What are you trying to make?

------
Brother Innovis 1250D
Babylock Enlighten
Singer Curvy 8763
Brother 1034D
Janome 385.19606
Brother 2340CV

Calendria
Calendria
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Date: 7/24/12 4:41 AM

well right now I am making a headband out of cotton that I know will get some serious use out of it.

I am also going to make kwik sew 3599 and am thinking of interfacing the band and the straps.

heathergwo
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Date: 7/24/12 11:49 AM

Usually the pattern (if you're using one) makes suggestions for the type of interfacing you should use.

If, however, they don't, or you're not using a pattern, you kinda have to get a feel for the different types of interfacing out there and figure out what will work best.

For the headband, I think I might use something like a fairly stiff pellex and possibly even spray adhesive. That stuff can be pretty thick and trying to sew it can be difficult. But it will bend and be pretty sturdy for a headband.

As for the KS, I would use something a lot softer. I'm thinking a light to mid-weight pellon that has a little weight, but not too much.

Of course there are better interfacings than the ones at Joann's (Pellon), but those are the most convenient. There is a lady here on PR that has an interfacing shop that has fabulous products, but they are definitely pricier than JA.

Also... why are you wanting to use sew-in specifically?? I think for the KS pattern, I'd use fusible. It's SOOO much easier and you won't have that additional stitch line that you're trying to hide, especially on those straps & front bodice top. Just a thought!

HTH

------
Brother Innovis 1250D
Babylock Enlighten
Singer Curvy 8763
Brother 1034D
Janome 385.19606
Brother 2340CV

CM_Sews
CM_Sews
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In reply to Calendria <<
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Date: 7/24/12 1:20 PM

Quote: Calendria
what do you guys like to use for sew in interfacing? the same fabric? something different?

You certainly can use a piece of fabric as interfacing. I know some people like the crispness of silk organza. Just wash it and dry it to preshrink it, then use it like any sew-in Pellon-type interfacing. Erin of Dress-a-Day discusses using organza as interfacing and how she "washes the heck out of it" in this blog posing (read the comments for details about pre-washing the organza).

However, you can use any fabric to get the "heft" you want. A crispy poly-cotton blend might be just what you need, for example.

Sew-in interfacing, and how to use it: When I first started sewing, back when dinosaurs roamed the earth***, all I had was sew-in interfacing, the Pellon-type non-woven stuff, which is still available at places like Joanns and Hancocks. I'd cut interfacing from the same pattern piece, stack the interfacing on the wrong side of the matching fabric garment piece, then sew a basting stitch at 1/2-inch from the edge of the fabric, just outside the 5/8-inch seam line. Then trim the excess interfacing seam allowance close to the basting stitch line. (ETA: To be a bit clearer here, I trim only the interfacing, not the garment fabric.) When I sewed interfaced garment pieces to one another, the interfacing would be caught in the seam, but most of the bulk was removed from the seam allowances.

This same basic technique should work with any fabric that you want to use as interfacing.

For fusible interfacing, I really like the knit interfacings I've tried, which don't change the hand of the fabric as much. Right now I'm using a knit fusible interfacing that I bought at a sewing expo. It's wonderful, and I've never seen anything like it at Joann's or Hancocks. No idea of the brand, but when I run out I'll be visiting Fashion Sewing Supply to re-stock.

CMC
***Pathetic stories about walking 5-miles to school in the snow omitted, mostly because it never happened. I do remember when fusible interfacing was the latest NEW thing in sewing. It was a Really Big Deal.


-- Edited on 7/24/12 10:52 PM --
Calendria
Calendria
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Date: 7/24/12 7:44 PM

I would like to try out sew-in interfacing because I don't always like the feel of fusible interfacing and after so many washings it just doesn't stand the test of time for me.

so. . . . I would like to test it out with small experiments first.

thanx all

Calendria
Calendria
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Date: 7/25/12 5:55 PM

also when you use sew-in interfacing is it the same thing as underlining? and either way do you use hand stitches or do you use machine stitching?

CM_Sews
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In reply to Calendria <<


Date: 7/25/12 6:21 PM

Back when dinosaurs roamed the earth, I machine basted the interfacing to the matching fabric piece. Quick and easy. There's no reason to do this by hand.

I suppose it does resemble the technique you would use to underline something, because you baste the matching pieces together (underlining and fashion fabric), and then assemble. But when you underline, you might underline all (or most) of the parts of the garment to give stability to the entire garment.

However, I only used sew-in interfacing on the facing pieces, or wherever the pattern told me to use interfacing: in a collar, neck facing, button placket, etc.

CMC

LynnRowe
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In reply to Calendria <<


Date: 7/29/12 1:04 AM

No, it's not the same as underlining. Interfacing adds support to varying degrees to the fashion fabric; underlining adds oppacity and/or body to the fwshion garment, and is treated as one with the fashion fabric during construction.

There are various ways to attach sew-in interfacing and it depends on the garment; fabric glue sticks are great, just place tiny dots in the seam allowances to "baste" the interfacing in place until it's permanently sewn in by machine. You can also hand or machine baste the interfacing in place until it's sewn permanently. These methods are for interfacing that is only held in place by the seamlines.

For garments such as suit jacket revers and collars, the sew-in interfacing isn't permanently sewn into the seamlines; it's hand, machine, or a mix of both, stitched to the fashion fabric within the garment sections themselves, and usually is not extended into the seam allowances. The stitching shapes the garment areas and is called "pad stitching".

I personally prefer sew-in interfacing for all but the most casual of garments. Some interfacing materials I use most often are silk organza, hair canvas, unbleached cotton muslin, and cotton flannel, as well as woven and knit interfacing fabrics (Pellon-type).

HTH

------
I heart Panzy, Pfaff Creative Performance, the sewing machine love of my life!
And Baby (Enlighten serger), Victor (BLCS), Ash (B350SE-Artwork), Kee (B750QEE-Panzy's BFF), Georgie (B560-Kee's baby sister) and the Feather-Flock!

Most of all, I heart Woo (HimmyCat). Until we meet again, my beautiful little boy. I love you.

Calendria
Calendria
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Date: 7/29/12 8:02 PM

okay, so maybe I'm bein a lil anal retentent then cuz most of the garments i like ARE casual and if I do need support its mostly in the armhole area, or the neck or cuffs or straps or something. so maybe just a high quality LITE fusible intefacing that gives a soft support would be good.

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