SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Platinum Sponsor
PatternReview.com
PatternReview.com

Forum > Quilters' Corner > Repairing a vintage quilt ( Moderated by Sharon1952)

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
Repairing a vintage quilt
Advice?
purplebouquet
star
purplebouquet
Advanced
Arkansas USA
Member since 11/16/05
Posts: 1225
Send Message

      



Date: 8/1/12 10:39 AM

I am looking for advice on how to repair a vintage quilt. I am a regular poster to the garment-sewing topics on this website, but I know very little about quilting or quilts and the care they require.

When cleaning out my MIL's condo recently, we set aside a quilt to use in our own bedroom. I googled the pattern and evidently, it's an example of Grandmother's Flower Garden I know that neither my MIL nor her mother or MIL made it, but at one point, my MIL spoke about having won an antique or vintage quilt at a show. This may be it. Anyway, a lot of the little hexagons are fraying and tearing, revealing the batting underneath.

I love this quilt and would love to extend its life. I don't know if it's valuable per se, but the mere fact that it brightens and cheers my bedroom is valuable enough for me that I want to take good care of it. I called some of my local folkart museums for advice, and they referred to me to out-of-state conservators, which sounds like a lot more money that I can spend on this.

Any advice? Thank you.

Claudia

justgail

justgail
Intermediate
Iowa USA
Member since 1/19/06
Posts: 742
Send Message

      



Date: 8/1/12 1:27 PM

I've seen repairs done by appliqueing a matching piece in as close of a matching fabric as possible over the frayed piece. I'd guess it depends on how much and how close the pieces are, and if it's due to the fabric, or wear, how you'd go about repairs.

Do you have any photos? It might help to know if it's a few spots, or lots.

CM_Sews
CM_Sews
Intermediate
California USA
Member since 9/18/04
Posts: 1767
Send Message

      



In reply to justgail <<


Date: 8/1/12 4:54 PM

In some quilt magazine, probably several years ago, I read an article about fixing or restoring a quilt, and they used a scanner to scan the fabrics on the quilt that were still in good condition and then printing onto fabric to obtain matching fabric for patches. This did require some fiddling with the color levels and lightness/darkness in the computer to obtain fabric that matched, but it was a clever way to duplicate small pieced of vintage fabric.

You'll need an ink jet printer and special fabric sheets, for example: EQ Printables.

Grandmother's Flower Garden design is actually a good candidate for appliqueing patches to repair it.

Note that conserving a quilt is not necessarily the same as repairing a quilt for use on a bed. Conservation involves stabilizing the quilt so that it does not deteriorate further and any restoration is done in a manner that can be undone at a later date. A conserved quilt is often displayed as an artwork. If you use a quilt as bedding, you'll eventually want to clean it, which can contribute to the further deterioration of an antique quilt. Depends on the specific quilt, and how fragile or worn it is to start with.

Quilt Conservation article, Kansas State University (opens a PDF).

CMC

purplebouquet
star
purplebouquet
Advanced
Arkansas USA
Member since 11/16/05
Posts: 1225
Send Message

      



Date: 8/2/12 10:40 AM

Thank you, both. Our history museum referred me to a conservator in New Orleans, and we had a lovely phone chat. She was so gracious and generous with her advice, I am very thankful. She suggested repairing the quilt by hand-appliqueing new hexagons using a fabric that complements the others. Since I know how to sew, I'd be the (wo)man for the job. I am not looking forward to hand-appliqueing dozens of tiny hexagons, but I can progress slowly, one section at a time while chatting on the phone or watching TV. Maybe it will be therapeutic? Also, finding complementary fabric will be trickly. I'll have to find a matching color cotton and then distress it by repeatedly washing and sundrying it so it will look more vintage than new. But I am glad that I know what to do.

Claudia

tinflutterby
tinflutterby  Friend of PR
Advanced
California USA
Member since 8/9/11
Posts: 288
Send Message

      



Date: 8/2/12 8:01 PM

I'm doing this now for a quilt from my husbands family. There was only one fabric that had rotted out all the rest are good. You may find that to be true too. Larger quilt store do carry vintage reproduction fabric from various eras and there are also vintage fabrics available. Lastly Spoonflower.com will print what ever you want.

Babe B
Babe B  Friend of PR
Intermediate
New Hampshire USA
Member since 10/4/04
Posts: 283
Send Message

      



In reply to purplebouquet <<


Date: 8/2/12 8:53 PM

Claudia,

If you can identify the time period for the fabrics in the quilt, perhaps the 1930's, reproduction fabrics are available through quilt shops online or near you. Sometimes it's possible to use the wrong side of the fabric which has a softer look, and so you wouldn't have to distress new fabric. You may also be able to find vintage fabrics in antique stores or at flea markets for that and other time periods.

gramma b
star
gramma b
USA
Member since 7/25/08
Posts: 3069
Send Message

      



Date: 8/3/12 10:16 AM

I am not a quilter, but repaired one for a relative so she could pass it on
to her granddaughter. I saved the now-thin patches that I could by adding a backing for strength, adding new strips in closely-matching patterns, mainly on frayed outer edges. (It had been made from family clothing, so the fabrics meant a lot.) It will just be hung, not used.

If you are in the city, search for local home quilting groups. They may enjoy restoring it for you without as much charge as a commercial job. Our groups that sew for the homeless and hospitals have done that.

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Quilters' Corner >> Repairing a vintage quilt

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Fit the Tee to a T
Fit the Tee to a T

Register

Restyling with Exposed Zippers
Restyling with Exposed Zippers

Register

Other Patterns of Fashion

photo
by: MCBurbage

Review
Butterick 5682

photo
by: thestitche...

Review

Pattern

BRUSH FRINGE JACKET, a CD book by Kenneth King

BRUSH FRINGE JACKET, a CD book by Kenneth King

Buy Now
You Sew Girl Beach Bag Pattern

You Sew Girl Beach Bag Pattern

Buy Now

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.