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Forum > Beginner's Forum > grainline options on pattern piece ( Moderated by EleanorSews)

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grainline options on pattern piece
what is the general rule on this?
solveg
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solveg  Friend of PR
Minnesota USA
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Date: 8/26/12 12:34 PM

I'm making Kwik•Sew 3603 and some of the pattern pieces have the grainline marked specifically to be cut with the grain or the crossgrain, while others are the standard grainline only.

I've never seen this on a pattern before. The pieces that can be cut on the crossgrain are things like casings and ties, not the main pattern pieces that need to drape straight.

Am I interpreting this right, that this is the rule for all patterns? That the only things critical to cut with the grainline are the main pieces where drape is important?

heathergwo
heathergwo
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Date: 8/26/12 12:47 PM

I think each pattern has it's own setup for what can be cut on the grain or crossgrain (bias) based on how the garment should drape or where it might need some stretch.

Often ties & casings and bias strips, etc. need a little stretch or it doesn't matter if they have stretch, so for layout purposes pattern companies will put those on the bias to save room.

I've found that depending on what you're making you can take a little creative license with layout as long as you know what you're doing. You don't want to put a skirt on the grain when it's supposed to be bias unless you know for sure how that will affect the fit and drape. For example right now I'm making an apron for my sister and one of the pieces was supposed to be on the grain line, but I was running out of fabric and since it's just an apron and it's only cotton, I laid the piece on the bias. I just have to be careful not to pull on that piece too much as it's got a lot more stretch.

Sorry for the long-winded response ... HTH!

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Marie367
Marie367  Friend of PR
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In reply to solveg <<
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Date: 8/26/12 1:09 PM

Stretch is the reason. Even wovens have stretch when cut crosswise or bias. Skirts, pants, and most shirts have a definite grainline that needs to be followed or you will have strange stretching in places that you didn't want stretching. Most other pieces can be done both ways-but keep in mind that stretch is a factor. Sewing bias ties can be a pain to press and sew and one that is not necessary if cut parallel to selvage (which is usually what I do). I can usually use less fabric than a pattern calls for by creative positioning of pattern pieces. However, I don't recommend that for beginners. You also have to remember that most fabrics have nap and if you twist patterns around on a fabric to save space, you can end up with what looks like two different colors when sewn up.

beauturbo
beauturbo
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In reply to solveg <<


Date: 8/26/12 2:55 PM

Can't see your printed pattern layout for just that pattern, but I'm guessing it might be the drawstring? Since pattern made for wovens and not knits, I don't think stretch is a huge big factor there, going either way. If it's just the drawstring or a casing for it, those things are kind of long, and space hoggy laid out on fabric though, and so are cut on dolman sleeves and possibly they got them laid out either way, just for fabric yardage and cutting saving ability even. As if it would take a lot more fabric in the lay out to cut one way over the other, I think you really could use them going either way.

If instead it's the body of the shirt with those cut on sleeves on it, and the hem of the shirt, maybe it's for if you want to use some kind of border print along the hemline of it instead?

Elcue
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Date: 8/26/12 3:02 PM

I'll just add some bits I've learned about fabric. The grain yarns are the strongest yarns in the weave. The crossgrain yarns are known as fill and are usually weaker, finer yarns or more decorative yarns with slubs or metallic things. Pieces cut on the crossgrain are probably placed that way to save on fabric.

The bias is at 45 degree angle. Bias tape is very flexible and will follow curves around necklines, armholes and the like. Larger pieces like skirt panels have a lovely drape. Sometimes pieces have special placement so part is straight of grain for stability and part is more drapey, like a Peter Pan collar.

solveg
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solveg  Friend of PR
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Date: 8/26/12 3:43 PM

OK. Thanks! I just had not seen it spelled out that way before on a pattern piece and thought it was a good thing to learn about. It was!

Elona
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In reply to Elcue <<


Date: 8/26/12 10:38 PM

Quote: Elcue
...The grain yarns are the strongest yarns in the weave. The crossgrain yarns are known as fill and are usually weaker, finer yarns or more decorative yarns with slubs or metallic things...

Yessss!

And you can really see this on upholstery fabrics, where the crossgrain threads (the weft) are incredibly thin and crappy. Often this will be pointed out to the unsuspecting customer as a charming 'design' feature called something like 'thick and thin.'
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