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Forum > Beginner's Forum > interfacing--is it really necessary? ( Moderated by EleanorSews)

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interfacing--is it really necessary?
Peggy Sager says no....
solveg
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solveg  Friend of PR
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Date: 8/26/12 3:48 PM

One more question. I'm sewing on a really light, flyaway pattern. Think kimono robe.

The instructions are saying I should interface the facings that run up the fronts and behind the neck.

However, I was watching a Peggy Sager video the other day, and she very clearly said that the clothing we made nowadays was "softer" and didn't need these interfacings. I didn't know what to think about that, but I am really tempted to go without for this project, especially since this is about as soft a style as you could make in a garment.

opinions?

threaddy
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In reply to solveg <<
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Date: 8/26/12 3:55 PM

Obviously the interfacing is to give body so the neck and fronts don't sag. How about a very soft interfacing just to keep the front area a bit more crisp but not heavy? I was even thinking about a strip of sheeting material or a fine gauzy something just for a wee bit of oomph.
-- Edited on 8/26/12 5:37 PM --

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Julia C
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Date: 8/26/12 4:04 PM

I was told this 30+ years ago in HomeEc along with that you did not need to prewash the fabric. However, I like the results better with interfacing. After making a blouse & not prewashing which shrank at least 3" in the sleeves, I have prewashed ever since.
On your kimono, I don't think it will matter that much so see how you like it not interfaced.
Also, definitely buy interfacing from Fashion Sewing Supply. It is worth it not to have bubbling.

JTink
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In reply to solveg <<


Date: 8/26/12 4:34 PM

I interface all my facings(if called for). It gives a better look. I took a Judy Kessinger Pants fitting class several weeks ago. She was telling people to not use pins Some things you can get by with on that, but some you can't. The novice sewists in the room, were hanging on her every word. I would love to be a fly on the wall, when one of them tries to stitch up a pant leg, or a crotch curve, without using pins...amazing.

a7yrstitch
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Date: 8/26/12 4:35 PM

I would consider interfacing at least what you might think of as a v neck collar area and then continue a few inches past the curve that leads intofine final straight-away down the side front.

You could use light interfacing or a fabric for interfacing. A little creative top stitching can be used to give the collar and facings more heft. Perhaps extra top stitching along what you would think of as the collar and less top stitching on the areas that become the side fronts.

Also, don't let the pattern dictate your facings. Perhaps the pattern has a nice wide facing of three or four inches down the front. You could reduce the width of that facing to the width of a 'band' + enough to turn over for a nice finish. Then, top stitch. ( I'd still use a light interfacing.).

Or, maybe you would like to try edge binding on this project instead of using a facing. Replace the entire facing with edge binding, or.......

Edge bind across the back of the neck and down the fronts down to waist level. At waist level, bring the binding off of the garment and extend into long ties.

Then neatly finish from the waist down.

The ties could be handled one of two ways.

1. Inside tie to meet short inside tie secured to opposite seam allowance at waist height. And outside tie to meet short outside tie secured to outside of opposite side at waist height. The outside tie could be secured in the side seam when stitching it. You could leave a portion of the side seam open when constructing so you would be able to check the placement when you try on the almost finished garment.

2. Inside tie made extra long feeds through hole in side seam on opposite side, wraps around to meet tie from other side front.

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solveg
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Date: 8/26/12 4:55 PM

Hmmmm. When I started sewing again, I thought that it was going to be primarily learning how to follow instructions well and not rush through things. Now I see that a lot of it can't be learned by books and videos... you just have to experiment on different fabrics, doing different techniques.

Thanks for all the input, everyone.

a7yrstitch: thanks for the reminder that I shouldn't be dictated to by facings. You are absolutely right!!! And that is exactly how I want to think about these patterns. Those were all very creative suggestions. I'm definitely going to at least decrease the width of the facing.

quathy
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Date: 8/26/12 5:20 PM

I would add that you can use silk organza as an interfacing. It's extremely light but will help hold the structure. Some are stiffer than others, and they will soften when prewashed. When I think an interfacing might be too heavy, I'll use organza. I've used it in collars and cuffs and it works great!

You can get white cheap ($5-6/yd) from Dharma Trading. NAYY.

Lena Merrin
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Date: 8/26/12 6:22 PM

if greedy manufacturers still interface their garments, so should we :)

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LarryD
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Date: 8/26/12 6:23 PM

I am inlined to agree that using interfacing is a better idea than not. As mentioned silk organza or a light weight such as "Touch of Gold" both of which should be pre shrunk as should you garment fabric. Good luck






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Marie367
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Date: 8/26/12 6:28 PM

I almost always use interfacings-it gives a more structured look and is critical on tailored garments. I almost always regret not using it but don't think I have every regretted using it.

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