SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Forum > Sergers, Coverstitch and Blindhemmers > How often would I have to convert? ( Moderated by CarolynGM, Deepika)

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
How often would I have to convert?
Serger w/Coverstich combo machine
zeoplum
star
zeoplum
Beginner
AL USA
Member since 7/1/05
Posts: 662
Send Message

      



Date: 9/12/12 10:25 PM

Hi! I'm considering buying my first serger so I've spent a lot of time reading through all of the reviews and forum messages here on sergers and whether it's better to get a combo machine versus two dedicated machines. I think the case is fairly compelling that two machines is better than one if you have the space. I really don't have a lot of space and I don't want to get 2 machines if by chance, a combo machine might work well for me. I'm still a beginner sewer and have never sewn knits. But I'm extra curvy and tend to buy mostly knits in my RTW clothes and would REALLY like to learn to make my knit garments.

So, as someone who has never been through the process, can you give me an idea of the typical number of times I would need to convert from serger to cover and vice versa? I'm mostly interested in making tops. I know there are some people who will sew & serge several projects up to a point, then convert to coverstich and do that part all at once on several items. But I'm not one of those kind of people. I would strictly work on one project at a time. So how many times would I have to go back and forth?

Thank you for your help!
Stephanie

sewsally
star
sewsally  Friend of PR
Intermediate
WA USA
Member since 8/18/02
Posts: 1321
Send Message

      



Date: 9/12/12 10:33 PM

You could save all the coverstitching until last.

I like having two machines though (Babylocks). The combo serger/cover I used to have was a pain to change and I always got thread caught somewhere.

People that have the latest Babylock combo love it though.

Immelu
star
Immelu  Friend of PR
Intermediate
KS USA
Member since 5/6/06
Posts: 340
Send Message

      



Date: 9/12/12 11:06 PM

It really depends on the type of top....If it were a normal t-shirt, I would serge shoulders, probably sew neckband on with the regular sewing machine first, then maybe serge to make it look better, then serge sleeves and side seams, then switch to coverstitch and hem the sleeves and bottom. So, for a t-shirt, that's one conversion from serger to coverstitch.

If I were making a wrap top, I MIGHT want to coverstitch the neck part. That would reguire a conversion after sewing the shoulders (on serger), to coverstitch to do around the front, then back to serger for sleeve insertion and side seams. Then back to coverstich to do sleeve hems and bottom hems. So, serger, coverstitch, serger, coverstitch.

For the t-shirt version, it's not a big deal...for the wrap top, I would probably be annoyed (but I'd do it if I thought the end product was going to be worth it). For my wrap tops, i prefer to serge on clear elastic, turn under and top stitch, so I'm not even really sure that I would do the coverstich in that step, but you COULD.

I also know some people use their coverstich to bind on the neckband, but I've never done that so I can't speak to it.

That's how I'd do it...there may be shortcuts that others would use.

Hope that helps!

SusiM
star
SusiM  Friend of PR
Intermediate
CA USA
Member since 2/12/06
Posts: 55
Send Message

      



Date: 9/13/12 1:48 AM

I use both machines back and forth. Changing functions between serger and coverstich on the same machine will become tiresome and limiting. But if that is what you can manage now, it certainly is a better option than no coverstich capability at all. I love what a neat finish my Janome coverstich provides.

------
susi

TamNearPDX
TamNearPDX
Advanced Beginner
WA USA
Member since 1/16/08
Posts: 211
Send Message

      



In reply to SusiM <<
thumbsup 2 members like this.


Date: 9/13/12 1:56 AM

I don't want to hijack this topic, but I'm trying to wrap my mind around how many cones or spools of thread I would need if I had 3 separate machines for 1 garment.
-- Edited on 9/13/12 1:18 PM --

iSewQuiltArt
star
iSewQuiltArt
Advanced
AUSTRALIA
Member since 4/4/08
Posts: 3593
Send Message

      
thumbsup 1 member likes this.



Date: 9/13/12 2:16 AM

About the conversion, it depends on the garment and where you might want to coverstitch, or indeed even chain for basting/ fitting.
Perhaps as well as considering how many times you need to convert you should pay close attention to the ease of conversion for the models you look at and pay huge attention to how they handle different layers, including fleece. And what happens as you go over a seam that is properly prepared (sa facing opposite directions)- some machines are horribly good at skipping stitches and incase you aren't aware, in a coverstitch this means the hem will unravel.
Some machines may be more simple to convert than others. I used to have a cs capable overlocker and detested it. Selling it and buying a simple overlocker I liked more and seperate coverstitch machine was the best thing I ever did for my knit sewing, without a doubt. Not only is it faster, it is easier, and for me with the model of combo machine I had, the results are infinitely better.

About the spools of thread what you can do is like many people on PR, wind bobbins for use in the needle and have one spool of thread for the looper, or even use bobbins there too. It means you need to buy a larger spool of thread but you can use it further. Many of us use matching threads in needle of overlocker and blending overlocker thread, so you want two spools for the needle or one larger one that you wind bobbins for the needles from. Also check, not all machines may take bobbins happily but you can use a Bob N Serge on a thread stand if like me the Bob n Serge doesn't fit onto my overlocker.. some people use it for coverstitch also... Now, If you don't want to share those spools with your coverstitch machine then buy a third spool.

Bobbins are more than enough I have found to hem a simple T shirt. I would recommend a 250 m spool of thread rather than a 100 metre, so you can wind two bobbins or three depending if you do two or three needle coverstitch, and put the spool onto the looper. Running multiple machines doesn't mean having to have a zillion spools of thread so it doesn't have to cost extra beside the machine itself. If you were to use a twin needle to hem you would want a seperate spool of thread for that anyway or look at winding bobbins off for it. Working with a coverstitch machine is no different really except that you do need more thread for the looper in a coverstitch machine.

------
Quilting up a storm
Bernina Girl, in possession of a small herd...

beauturbo
beauturbo
Advanced
CA USA
Member since 5/2/09
Posts: 3319
Send Message

      



In reply to zeoplum <<


Date: 9/13/12 2:28 AM

If you were making a simple knit top, that just had front, back and sleeves to it, and wanted the garment seams 4 thread overlock, and neck edge and sleeve edge and hem edge just coverlocked, it would depend on your construction method that you picked. (flat contruction, of seaming the whole under arm sleeve seam and side seams in one fell swoop, or more inset, into a finsihed arm hole seam and sleeves sewn closed into more a tube first. If you don't feel you have to cover stitch in the "round at all" and lots of lesser, less expensive store bought tops might even not there too, then I think you would only have to switch back in forth in stitch types and rethread twice to do that. Also if you did it that way, and wanted cover stitch in the round, I think also twice. But if you prefer flat constuction instead, (I kinda do) and your cover stitch in the round too, then I think at least 3 times.

However I don't like my simple knit tops like that, just because if I'm bothering to be making it, I want it to look better than the cheapest of ones sold in some store, and I actually prefer to have any cover stitched edge, most times, stitched in the round instead. So I most times do shoulder seams 4 thread, switch to cover stitch to turn under neck, then inset sleeves into arm hole flat, and open with 4 thread overlock, then do sleeve hem to bottom hem flat, and then back to cover stitch to hem bottom hem and sleeve hems. I think done that way you would be switching around 4 times: as in 4 thread overlock, cover stitch, 4 thread overlock, and then cover stitch last. Just depends on how you want to do it though.

tinflutterby
tinflutterby  Friend of PR
Advanced
CA USA
Member since 8/9/11
Posts: 278
Send Message

      



In reply to TamNearPDX <<


Date: 9/13/12 3:13 AM

The only colors I have enough spools for everything is white and black. Any other colors and I use the bobbins.

MegquiltsinVT

MegquiltsinVT
Intermediate
VT USA
Member since 6/3/09
Posts: 119
Send Message

      



In reply to zeoplum <<


Date: 9/13/12 6:15 AM

A year ago I went shopping for a serger/overlock combo machine and ended up with two separate machines. I sat with the saleswoman, who is very patient & helpful, but not an expert at making the switch between serging and coverstitch functions. After two hours we weren't happy with the stitches because some setting or tension adjustments were incorrect. I'm rather mechanically inclined and these two TOL machines left me completely frustrated. I purchased a serger and a coverstitch machine and am very happy. This set-up requires more table space but it's far less aggravating than the maddening process of switching the process on one machine. As Gallagher says, never buy a machine which can't decide what it wants to be.
That's my two cents. Best luck to you in your personal search for equipment!

------
Pfaff QE4.0, 1222E, 796
Janome 1000cpx, 1110 dcx
Singer Featherweight, grandmother's treadle
New Home treadle

BeeBeeSew
star
BeeBeeSew
Advanced Beginner
MD USA
Member since 12/13/07
Posts: 826
Send Message

      



Date: 9/13/12 7:55 AM

I will just tell you my experience. I have a very nice Bernina Serger/combo, does it all - maybe even folds the laundry. But I never switch it over, frankly I'm just too lazy, or feel that it takes too much time to switch it around and trying to match my sewing to the machine configuration just never works. So I found I only used it to serge and never coverstitched anything. And I wanted to coverstitch. I was pea-green with coverstitch envy. I ended up buying (from Amazon, FWIW) the Brother 1034D serger and then switching my Bernina to coverstitch. I am quite happy with this set up. I have the 2 machines kind of crammed in together but that doesn't really bother me too much, I just shove one out the way (takes far less time than rethreading a machine, let me tell you!). I really wanted to love the Bernina as a do-all machine but it just wasn't working out between us. Now, as it is happily coverstitching away next to the Brother serger we're a happy trio. My $0.02.

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Sergers, Coverstitch and Blindhemmers >> How often would I have to convert?

Merchants on PR

Patterns from the Past


vintage sewing patterns
Deals!

Reconstructing History


Reconstructing History
Web site

Elliott Berman Textiles


Fabrics for Greater Ideas
Deals!

Gwyn Hug


Fabric Shopping Help!
Deals!

Lanetzliving Vintage Sewing Patterns


Vintage Sewing Patterns
Deals!

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
The Contemporary Couture Jacket
The Contemporary Couture Jacket

Register

Clone Your Favorite Garment
Clone Your Favorite Garment

Register

Bluegingerdoll The Ava Jacket Paper Pattern

Bluegingerdoll The Ava Jacket Paper Pattern

Buy Now
You Sew Girl 200mm Kiss Purse Pattern

You Sew Girl 200mm Kiss Purse Pattern

Buy Now

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.