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Removing ease in a sleeve
FreyaStark
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FreyaStark  Friend of PR
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Date: 11/3/12 6:57 AM

Can someone please tell me how to reduce ease at the top of a blouse's sleeve to facilitate attaching the sleeve with a flat seam rather than fitted? (I hope I have made myself clear!)
I have heard of reducing the ease but have never seen an example and have no idea how to do it.
Thanks.

------
"To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world."

VolcanoMouse
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Date: 11/3/12 11:54 AM

I've also been wondering how to do this! Have you been reading Fashion-Incubator, too?

Sandra Betzina's Fast Fit mentions reducing sleevecap ease by slashing and overlapping the sleevecap. It's on page 137 in my copy, the section on correcting a twisted sleeve.

Green Apples recently published her own method of removing sleevecap ease.

I've tried both methods while making a personal block, and I'm not sure if I prefer either one. The latter one, I worry, would reduce the cap height too much and cause some of those twisted sleeve wrinkles Ms. Betzina was trying to correct. But I could be wrong-- I'm quite new at this.

Very interested to see if other folks have different methods.Best of luck! :)

carolynw
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In reply to FreyaStark <<


Date: 11/3/12 12:23 PM

Not sure if this will help but here is how I do it - draw a line across the sleeve cap roughly 5 - 6" down from the seam and absolutely at right angles to the straight grain line - next a second line 1/8" down (sometimes I use a bit more more but never more than 1/4".

Fold carefully on one line and bring to the other making a small tuck and that does the trick for me.

I do this when I know the sleeve cap has too much ease but not to make a flat felled seam possible - to do that you may have to reduce more of the ease but that might bring unexpected problems so best to experiment first.

Good luck

Edited to add: This is the method taught when I took an extensive course on dressmaking/tailored jackets/coats/pants etc.
-- Edited on 11/3/12 12:27 PM --

CRUST
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Date: 11/3/12 1:18 PM

uh, are you talking about changing the seam allowance or switching from a set in to drop sleeve?

petro
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Date: 11/3/12 1:49 PM

There's a difference between the way a classic shirt sleeve and a set in sleeve are drafted. The classic shirt sleeve is designed to sew in flat, the armscye is changed as well.
But I have a feeling that you're just looking at a pattern which is a set in sleeve and has allowed a generous amount of cap ease which you'd like to reduce? If there's not too much ease you can certainly sew it in flat, even though its not the usual method.

To reduce overmuch ease you need to take four measurements on the bodice pattern, always on the stitching line, and always with the tape on edge as they're all curved. There should be balance marks front and back and at the top of the sleeve. If there are any missing, you'll have to make your own. (Sometimes commercial patterns skip a couple). The centre of the sleeve head goes to the shoulder seam, normally. If there's no balance mark on the sleeve, fold it in half lengthways and mark the top of the head. On the bodice, where the underarm curve starts to change from the concave one that goes under the arm to a slightly convex one by the upper chest and back there should be a balance mark front and back - if its not there put one in. Then measure all four sections of the bodice, and compare them to the equivalents on the sleeve. The underarm sections have to fit exactly, so that's just a check measurement in case the draft is all to pot. The other two tell you how much you have to reduce the sleeve head. Use your tape measure or if you have it a flexible curve to get a curve which is closer to your bodice measurements, keeping the curves ont he back of the sleeve flatter, and on the front more rounded. The point where the back curve changes from concave to convex is about halfway down the sleeve head, whereas on the front its about three quarters of the way down the sleeve head. You'll need to do a quick toile, because in fitting a sleeve to an armscye, there needs to be more ease if its set higher on the shoulder. Hope this helps.

Courtney Ostaff
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In reply to FreyaStark <<


Date: 11/3/12 5:49 PM

You might like this:
http://madebymonet.wordpress.com/2010/05/03/reducing-shoulder-cap-ease-without-crying/

or this:
http://designloft.blogspot.com/2008/03/tutorial-reduceremove-sleeve-cap-ease.html

Aixoise
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In reply to Courtney Ostaff <<
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Date: 11/3/12 7:55 PM

Thanks for these links, Courtney. I've just been wrestling with some 3-piece sleeves (why do anything simply?) and wish I had read these suggestions before I started. For now the sleeves are winning (gotta love the Big 4 - miles of extra sleeve cap ease - just in case?); but if I apply one or both of these techniques I might just conquer them.

FreyaStark
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FreyaStark  Friend of PR
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Date: 11/3/12 7:55 PM

Many thanks for all those suggestions. I will try them next time I make a blouse, and I'm sure I will find a method that works for me.

------
"To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world."

petro
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Date: 11/4/12 2:38 AM

Both of those links Courtney showed are pretty clear, clearer than my waffle. In the first link, the sleeve ease doesn't look excessive. There's a debate about sleeve cap ease, with some strong contenders being against it. The reason that a small amount of ease is added to a sleeve cap in a set in sleeve is to achieve three dimensionality in the sleeve head, sculpt it round the top of the shoulder. Its more necessary on some figures and on some styles ( higher set sleeve, overgarments), than on others.
The second link is focused on childrenswear, where sleeve cap ease isn't necessary - different morphology. The walking method shown is a different way of measuring, but IMO you need to be sure where the measurements on the bodice and the sleeve differ. Someone has already posted about a sleeve where the underarm part didn't match. That was on another thread as I recall. If you reduce the ease by making an adjustment which narrows the sleeve across the top arm, be sure you've given your arm enough space at the biceps level. The two other ways of reducing the ease - lowering the cap and redrawing the curves inwards, each have their effects. If the changes you make are small, those effects probably won't make a difference, especially if the garment isn't too tight fitting anyway, but its worth thinking about what you did when you try on the toile. Too much loss of height in the sleeve head might give drag lines from the shoulder point diagonally, and too much loss of width there might give pulling and bunching across the sleeve head.

FreyaStark
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In reply to petro <<


Date: 11/4/12 5:56 AM

Thanks for those helpful remarks.

------
"To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world."

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