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lace, beading and embroidery
what inspires you about them?
rmusic1
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rmusic1
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Date: 11/6/12 5:50 PM

I'm currently a few months in to a year long dress making course. We're currently going through a sampling unit. This is focusing on lace, embroidery and beading.

Apart from adding a lace trim to a slip, I haven't done any of the above. I must confess, my heart has not leapt with excitement at the thought of learning more about them because (and I'm not afraid of lots of work) the amount of effort required and the output achieved seem, well, a bit skewed.

So, as I am now committed to discovering more, I'd love everyone's take on any of these, and why they think they are worth investing in. I'm hoping this will help inspire me!

My dress making tutor spent over 3 hours yesterday showing the class pictures of high end couture embroidery - the work was pretty but I cant see easily how it translates in to the world of the home sewer. I'm very passionate about dress making so found it a shame to not feel as interested as I normally am in class.

Thank you all, as always!

oh, one last confession. I don't like handwork. This maybe helps explain my ummm reluctance.....I also don't have any embroidery features on my 1960's Bernina machine.

PattyE
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Date: 11/6/12 8:31 PM

I do needlepoint and counted-crossstitch, and I am so excited to see some fabulous needlepoint pieces showing up in RTW. Google Dolce and Gabbanna needlepoint and look at the beautiful garments. So it's not the same as embroidery but they are doing alot of beading in the needlepoint as well. You might find some inspiration by checking them out. Good luck!

Elona
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In reply to rmusic1 <<


Date: 11/6/12 11:24 PM

Let's say you make yourself a sheer top to wear over a cami. It could be plain--and that would be perfectly OK--but it could also be unique yet perfectly wearable. What would you prefer, something plain and anonymous, or something that stood out, just as little, as your very own?

With a basic Bernina, like mine, you can do something called 'free motion embroidery' or 'thread painting.' It can look a lot like hand embroidery. There are many examples on youtube or the net generally. Here is one example.

stirwatersblue
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stirwatersblue
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Date: 11/7/12 1:31 PM

I'm a lifelong needlewoman; I've been doing embroidery and counted needlework since I was five years old. I absolutely *LOVE* garments that are embellished with embroidery, particularly elaborate floral/vine designs that remind me of fairy tales (you did ask. LOL)! One of my very favorite garments is a purple velvet jacket embellished with tone-on-tone embroidery in a design reminiscent of "Lord of the Rings." (I like to wear it to events--I'm an author--and people always comment on it! As a fellow author once said, "That jacket makes a lot of friends." Hee! I WISH I'd made it, but it was just a lucky find!).

I am starting now to combine my needlework with my historical costuming, and am inspired by things like this:



And this...


I'm currently working on a reproduction of the embroidered chemise in Caravaggio's St. Catherine, and have spent a couple of years tracking down higher quality images of the portrait to see exactly what's going on with the embroidery.

One of my favorite inspirational books is Eighteenth Century Embroidery Techniques by Gail Marsh, which has the MOST luscious photographs of items made in the days when high-end clothing was embellished by studios of professional embroiderers (usually men). My favorite is a picture of an unfinished men's waistcoat embroidered on velvet--the embroidery is complete, but the pieces were never cut out!

Even the basic deco stitches on my machine have come into play in my costuming. I've done some machine blackwork on the collar stand of that partlet, and just finished a project using embroidered muslin, a machine deco stitch, and a serged rolled hem. That embroidered muslin might be my favorite fabric *ever.* I am still carrying around a swatch in my purse, just because.

Anything else you'd like to know?

------
~Gem in the prairie

rivergum
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rivergum
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In reply to rmusic1 <<


Date: 11/7/12 2:41 PM

i feel your pain, rmusic1! I do like hand work and embroidery, and I can appreciate the beautiful work done by others, but I have never been inspired to embellish garments I make myself. My tastes run more to the minimalist. To each her own I suppose.

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Taking in is happier than letting out.

Sydney, Australia

sarah in nyc

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Date: 11/7/12 3:46 PM

I often use embroidery to color correct a fabric that is almost but not quite right for a project. I'm doing it right now as a matter of fact.. beading can add light to an area of a garment. You can use embellishment to visually correct a garment whose proportions might be a bit off for the wearer. it's a tool. there are also some sewing skills that may have zero appeal at the moment but might be just the tool you need to solve a problem in the future.

A sprinkle of beads might make an inexpensive lace look like a much more expensive lace.

I get your pain though...I prefer clothing that isn't junked up,

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sarah in nyc
www.sewnewyork.blogspot.com

rmusic1
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rmusic1
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Date: 11/20/12 2:05 PM

hello ladies

I thought you might like to see that I've now actually tried my hand at embroidery. If you would like to see a photo please click here.

I have thought of one thing that I can be enthuse about - corsets! they are decorated with lace and embroidery. Without being too OTT for my personal taste!

a7yrstitch
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In reply to rmusic1 <<


Date: 11/20/12 2:53 PM

I believe you are in trouble now It seems that some of the things you have sewn have a vintagey edge; time to think about a little spring blouse with just a tiny hint of embroidery accenting the center back of the collar and/or the collar points.

Better yet.....
Having read a post on one of your other threads, I was about to recommend that your mother needs a hobby. Perhaps you could interest her in hand embroidery.

------
I have no idea what Apple thought I was saying so be a Peach and credit anything bizarre to auto correct.

n45
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Date: 11/20/12 8:51 PM

Have you checked out the Alabama Chanin studio books series. She uses a lot of simple, fitted shapes with ribbon embroidery, applique, reverse applique, and beading. She does a lot of tone on tone so the fabric looks interesting and textured but not old fashioned and over the top. You can see some samples at her blog.

I'm actually planning on doing some sashiko on some pockets because it is simple, linear, looks clean, and I love handwork but I'm in general not a fan of swirls and curls embroidery.
-- Edited on 11/20/12 8:52 PM --

rmusic1
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rmusic1
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Date: 12/4/12 3:21 PM

hi a7yrstitch

My mother has done hand embroidery before, but considering the massive pile of books she has bought and still hasnt made time to read, I dont think this is going to be a hobby she will take up.

I have encouraged her to do more knitting though, which she likes.

stirwatersblue - I really liked the examples you provided. I have just got a book out of the library and there are some lovely examples of lace and beading during the 1910's and 20's which inspire me far more than some of the modern stuff.

n45 - thanks for the advice, I will go back to your suggestion later on once I've caught up with my little back log of samples (2 lace ones to do!) but ribbon work sounds less fussy to do.

I've now finished my beading sample which took a Very Long Time. In short I dont have the patience to consider this as a regular adornment.

The sample can be viewed here if you are interested.
-- Edited on 12/4/12 3:22 PM --

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