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Forum > Creative Sewing > Beginner Ideas ( Moderated by Lynnelle)

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Beginner Ideas
Calendria
Calendria
Advanced Beginner
Alaska USA
Member since 7/4/05
Posts: 616
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Date: 11/20/12 8:40 PM

Eventually one day I'd love to make my own belly dance costumes for home or whatever.

but until then I'd love to learn some simple ways to decorate and embellish my clothing.

does anyone have any ideas. something simple and easy. not something thats, TOO much or overwhelming.

thanx.

a7yrstitch
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a7yrstitch  Friend of PR
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Texas USA
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In reply to Calendria <<
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Date: 11/20/12 11:26 PM

Include narrow strips of quilted fabric, skinny stitch on braid, piping, or pin tucks.

Decorative and innovative buttonholes and closures.

Color blocking is making a little comeback - if true color blocking is daunting just piece some fabrics together and cut your pattern out of the pieced fabric.

Play with border prints.

Watch for fabrics that have great linear print designs that can be used to make your own trims.

The only fabric painting I ever did was to use tiny accents of paint within prints. On one dress. I just sporadically added dots of paint to dots that were part of the paisley on black print. And, I increased the density of the added dots going down the dress. Another skirt and top had swirls and I reversed the process, sporadically adding a tiny accent to the swirls with more accents as the pattern approached the neckline.

None of this looked 'painted' as all of the paints matched whatever color they were applied over and it was applied very sparingly. It just gave the fabric a little bit of dimension.

You may enjoy researching fabric embossing.

Sometimes it is fun to incorporate bits of jewelry in a garment. And, you may have fun experimenting with embellishing accessories.

Well, those are just starters; I don't do a lot of embellishing. I am more of a fabric manipulator.
-- Edited on 11/20/12 11:28 PM --

------
I have no idea what Apple thought I was saying so be a Peach and credit anything bizarre to auto correct.

Calendria
Calendria
Advanced Beginner
Alaska USA
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Date: 11/20/12 11:58 PM

the only way I'd ever be interested in piping, would be for edges, like for the arms and hems and neck edges.

I would love to experiment with braids, rick racks and fringe

the only kind of fabric manipulation I'd be interested in would have to be shirring, pleats, etc. something basic not extreme wearable art

DonnaH
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DonnaH
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Date: 11/21/12 11:12 AM

Just FYI, piping also looks really smart along front princess seams.

Other ways to "dress up" you clothing (either self-made or RTW):

Collars and cuffs: I think there's actually a Simplicity pattern for removable collars right now. These can be added to any crew- or even some jewel-necklines. You can make faux fur collars to add to a coat (there's a bit of fabric that goes under the collar of the coat itself)). Collars (and cuffs) on garments you are making can be contrasting fabric (white on pastel blouses looks sharp) or use a print that would be too wild for the whole blouse/dress. If there is a sash or belt that can be made to match the collar/cuffs. They are also a great spot to concentrate embellishments - crystals, beads, decorative buttons, fabric embellishments (gathered fabric, ribbon, lace, rickrack, etc.), embroidery, or paint. Even only doing one side/point of the collar gives a different look.

Pockets: Patch pockets are another obvious place for embellishment of any kind. Everything you can do w/ the collar/cuff, you can do with a patch pocket. Plus, you can be creative with the shape of the pocket (almost any shape can be done - sort of an applique w/ either the top or side left open!) as well as the placement. Slash pockets are also a good place for piping.

AdaH
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AdaH  Friend of PR
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Date: 11/21/12 12:04 PM

Check out your library. There are tons of books about embelishing garments. Another good source is just looking at magazines and catalogs. Then use you reference books to learn how to do the technique.

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Ada

Calendria
Calendria
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Alaska USA
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Posts: 616
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Date: 11/21/12 5:21 PM

okay thanx so much

Sana
Sana
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Date: 11/23/12 4:14 PM

This book by Lois Ericson looks good: Design and Sew It Yourself. She has some other books on embellishment too.

------
"Once abolish the God, and the government becomes the God." (G. K. Chesterton)

Calendria
Calendria
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Alaska USA
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Date: 11/24/12 2:34 PM

thanx for the suggestion sana

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