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Interlining coat
dollydolittle
dollydolittle
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Date: 12/14/12 2:01 PM

Hello

I'm making a short, simplified version of Simplicity 2508 (single breasted, rounded collar, plain sleeves, inset pockets, no tabs anywhere) in what I call 'moleskin' navy faux fur ( short pile with a pattern made by pressing the fabric in different directions - would love to know what it is really called).

Anyway, I know I need to interline it to give it body, structure and warmth. What should I use? Thin cotton batting of the sort you use for quilting or fleece? Or something else?

Tips for construction would be appreciated too, I've just read somewhere that the best thing to do is to sew each interlining piece to each lining piece, then make up the garment. Is this a good idea?
-- Edited on 12/14/12 2:02 PM --

skae
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In reply to dollydolittle <<


Date: 12/14/12 2:26 PM

To make it warm I would line it with quilted lining that would make it warm.

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Ecclesiastes 11:7,8 Nothing on earth is more beautiful than the morning sun. Even if you live to a ripe old age, you should try to enjoy each day, because darkness will come and will last a long time. (CEV)

EleanorSews
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Date: 12/14/12 2:33 PM

I'd consider using flannel, pre-shrunk 3x at least, to interline and then line with maybe some sort of quilted lining or perhaps a flannel backed satin lining.

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dollydolittle
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Date: 12/14/12 2:36 PM

Thanks both, sorry, I should have said, I already have a beautiful lining for this.

Neither fabric was terribly expensive, but I love them both. Just looking for something to use to interline to make it a bit warmer without adding lots of bulk.

I have no idea where I would get flannel from.

Nancy K
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In reply to dollydolittle <<
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Date: 12/14/12 5:03 PM

You have several options. Interlining for warmth is typically done to the lining. In other words, the lining is underlined. You can use well washed cotton flannel or if you really want extra warmth you can use Thinsulate. It's warm and not bulky but it is not dry cleanable. This should really be attached to the lining. If you really feel that the fabric needs some support you can underline it with flannel instead of using it on the lining, but you still need some interfacing on the facings and it has to be a sew. I dont' see faux fur needing to be underlined, though maybe what I am imagining is not what you have. It's also generally pretty warm. The third option is a lambswool underlining. The only place I know that you can get it is Steinloff and Stoller in NYC. They do mail order. It is pretty expensive. So is the Thinsulate. Personally, I like cotton flannel and it adds enough warmth for LI. It might not be enough if you are doing a lot of walking in really cold weather. Or you could just find some quitled lining to for your lining, but that adds a lot of bulk to an already bulky fabric.

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dollydolittle
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In reply to Nancy K <<


Date: 12/14/12 5:39 PM

Thank you, what you say seems to support the other source I found who recommended sewing lining to interlining then treating as one.

I have found thinsulatePennine Outdoor, but only at 1.3 cm deep, which seems very bulky. Flannel, I still can't find except for expensive printed stuff designed for children's quilts and pyjamas. (I'm in the UK btw)

I'm just trying to avoid that homemade look of a floppy, insubstantial garment, maybe I'm going the wrong way about it? Should I perhaps be interfacing the whole garment with heavy soft interfacing instead? I've tried to find a photo of similar fabric on the net, but can't. I think of it as a 1950's type thing, very low pile

I'm not trying to make anything ultra warm, just the same kind of thing I could pick up at any UK high street shop if such places stocked things that would fit me.

dollydolittle
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In reply to dollydolittle <<


Date: 12/15/12 1:56 PM

Looked everywhere for cotton flannel today, couldn't find any.

In the end I have bought black brushed cotton, is that an OK substitute?

dollydolittle
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In reply to dollydolittle <<


Date: 12/15/12 6:04 PM

Looked everywhere for cotton flannel today, couldn't find any.

In the end I have bought black brushed cotton, is that an OK substitute?

Nancy K
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In reply to dollydolittle <<


Date: 12/16/12 7:07 PM

Sure. I don't know how warm it is, but it sounds like a good choice. Make sure that you wash and dry it a couple of times to make sure that it shrinks completely.

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squirrellypoo
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In reply to dollydolittle <<


Date: 12/17/12 8:41 AM

Quote: dollydolittle
I have found thinsulatePennine Outdoor, but only at 1.3 cm deep, which seems very bulky.

The Thinsulate from Pennine is NOT suitable for underlining, it's way too stiff (I know because I asked these exact same questions and rang up Pennine myself when I was researching this very question several years ago).

I've underlined several coats with the basic cotton flannel/winciette from Chawlas (efabrics.co.uk, then click Fabrics then Winciette, their site is terrible to link to!) - it's the best price I've found anywhere and does the job (make sure you prewash because it will shrink!).

The coats I've underlined in flannel are plenty warm enough for 90% of British winters. But on those few days of the year when it's exceptionally cold, I bring out my "Russian greatcoat", which I underlined entirely in microfleece (from Pennine Outdoor), and that sucker is WARM. The only change I'd make is to underline the entire sleeve - accepted internet wisdom tells you not to underline the under/inner sleeve but this means there's a portion in the upper back of the sleeve where the wind can get through, and I can feel it!

I wrote up some posts on coat interlining at the time:
1. interlining fabric choices
2. Attaching the microfleece interlining
3. Underlining with flannel
-- Edited on 12/17/12 8:42 AM --

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