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Forum > Creative Sewing > Help for a Tote Bag (of sorts) ( Moderated by Lynnelle)

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Help for a Tote Bag (of sorts)
.... for my BreadMachine
Canadian Jane
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Canadian Jane
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Date: 1/20/13 6:43 PM

My kitchen is just too small to have my Bread Machine taking up valuable counter space. So when not in use, it lives on my pantry floor. It is heavy and really awkward to get in and out. (My pantry is a reclaimed closet that was designed in the 60s when the house was built for brooms, mops and probably the vacuum.) I thought putting it in a tote bag of sorts to help move it in and out would be really helpful.

Any ideas on how to do this, or where I can find a pattern or tute? the BM measures 17 inches wide, 9 inches deep, and 12 inches high. (It is a horizontal bread machine and it has a domed top where the mixing happens.)

Any ideas or suggestions?? Greatly appreciated as always.

Until then, looking forward to home made Italian Bread with my pasta dinner tonight. Yummy!

beauturbo
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Date: 1/20/13 7:25 PM

What works good for me if I want to make a cover for for anything small like that, is a roll of paper towels. As long as they are as tall as the item, if not tape some together.

Stick paper towels behind item and use a felt tip pen to trace shape onto paper towels. Add some seam allowance onto there afterwards and maybe a tiny bit extra for "pop over ease". You want to cut two of those, maybe 4 if item lined. Now you can just take a long strip of rectangular fabric (cut way wider than you need it to be and sew to one of your cut shaped side pieces. After that, stick it on the machine/item, and you will see how wide it needs to end up being, just make it so then and sew the remaining cut and shaped piece on the same way.

In the end, it would be a shaped to anything, pop on cover with two side pieces and a curved top, and would have a center piece and two seams going down the side of it. Almost like a pieced bedspread, but shaped and not flat.

That works for pretty much just all stuff, and then you never need any exact sewing pattern either. You could try that and see if you like it.
-- Edited on 1/20/13 7:28 PM --

lca
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Date: 1/21/13 3:20 PM

How about something like a casserole carrier that opens flat. I have a casserole carrier similiar to this one that I use for everything - not just casseroles. It could be modified to the size you want. It is flat. On opposite corners you sew a ring. The other two corners you join with a long strip of fabric, a handle. You set your casserole, bread machine in the middle, pull up the corners with the rings, and the handle goes in the rings. Hope this makes sense.
-- Edited on 1/21/13 3:25 PM --

Canadian Jane
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Date: 1/21/13 10:45 PM

Great ideas.

I think I am going to go with the casserole carrier kind of thing. I will make wrap around jacket (that will lie flat when not in use) and put some side flaps on the back side that will wrap around to the front so the breadmaker can't slide out when I lift it. Add some handles and a pocket to keep the breadmaker guide. (Even after all these years I still refer to the guide a lot.) This will be a great opportunity to practise adding some decorative details and make it a fun project!

Thanks!

SewButterflySew
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Date: 1/23/13 5:21 PM

I made something kind of similar to that for my bread machine a few years ago. I used one of those canvas type storage cubes with handles on two sides, and sewed a zippered top onto it to keep dust off of the machine when it was in the closet (I was living in a small college apartment shared with 3 others, so all of my expensive cooking/sewing gadgets lived in my bedroom closet)

CM_Sews
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Date: 1/23/13 6:23 PM

On the Treadle On website, Captain "Richard" (his real nick name gets flagged as a "bad word") posted tutorials about sewing a tote bag for a vintage hand-crank sewing machine, a rather heavy item. He used Sunbrella fabric, french seams (explained in the intro page), and included a hard bottom cut from 1/8-inch plywood.

In the intro he mentions that a stiff fabric (unwashed denim, perhaps?) works well because the bag is not floppy, so it doesn't collapse as you are attempting to get the sewing machine in and out of the tote.

For your inspiration:

Sewing Machine Tote Bag, Intro
Sewing Machine Tote Bag, Part 1
Sewing Machine Tote Bag, Part 2

CMC
-- Edited on 1/24/13 0:53 AM --

Canadian Jane
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In reply to CM_Sews <<
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Date: 1/23/13 8:53 PM

Wow - that is some tote bag! I can see why he would need it though.

My breadmaker is not quite that heavy so I think I will stick with my wrap around jacket. I am using microfibre with a duck canvas lining (strong but not too stiff).

I am adding a pocket on the front that will be quilting cotton left over from another project for my booklet. It coordinates beautifully with the microfibre. Another pocket is going on the side for the cord. Two straps coming from the botton up the sides.

I tell ya, desiging it and cutting out the fabric will take longer than the actual sewing.

stirwatersblue
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Date: 1/24/13 1:24 PM

Quote: Canadian Jane
I tell ya, desiging it and cutting out the fabric will take longer than the actual sewing.

Well, heck--isn't that true of *everything?*

------
~Gem in the prairie

Canadian Jane
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In reply to stirwatersblue <<


Date: 1/24/13 3:28 PM

Yea, okay.... ... what I ment is that I think most people are much faster at the thinking and designing part than I am. Probably the sewing too. That may be why I am the poster child for the Slow Sewers Sew Along.

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