SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Forum > Sewing Techniques and Tips > What does 'pulling threads' & 'clipping threads' mean? ( Moderated by MissCelie)

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
What does 'pulling threads' & 'clipping threads' mean?
cakemix
cakemix
Advanced Beginner
Member since 12/23/11
Posts: 65
Send Message

      



Date: 4/5/13 12:30 PM

I've been reading lots of posts all over this board.
I've come across questions about pulling threads & clipping threads 'as you go along' (as opposed to waiting until you're finished)

What do these two things mean?

Also... I bought a sewing board from Hancock. I just started pining my pattern to my fabric and found that it's easier for me to 'stab' the pins on the pattern as opposed to the traditional way of pinning- like sewing with a needle.

So now my pattern looks like an acupuncture piece.
(Does this make sense)

So my question is- is this a good idea or not?

After all my years of sewing- pinning my pattern pieces the traditional way- I'm thinking that stabbing the pins will make everything much more accurate.

-- Edited on 4/5/13 12:57 PM --

JTink
star
JTink
Intermediate
Member since 4/20/08
Posts: 6011
Send Message

      



In reply to cakemix <<


Date: 4/5/13 12:43 PM

Pulling threads can mean several things. If it's "as you go along" it might be removing basting stitches. Or it could mean pulling up threads to gather something(ie. a sleeve head).

Clipping threads, I'm not really sure about. I can understand clipping to the threads, but not through. Perhaps someone else can help with that one.

wendyrb
wendyrb  Friend of PR
Advanced
CA
Member since 12/30/11
Posts: 3186
Send Message

      



In reply to cakemix <<
thumbsup 1 member likes this.


Date: 4/5/13 2:08 PM

Quote:
clipping threads 'as you go along' (as opposed to waiting until you're finished)


I think this means- sew and immediately snip the long thread tails off close to your work. Do not wait until the end when you have a hairy garment. The threads can get caught up in other seams and be stubborn to clean up at the end. Good to get the habit of thread snipping as you work. Modern machines often have a snip function built in. Also, sometimes the thread can make an impression on your cloth as you press. You may already have this pressing habit, but if not I encourage you to cultivate it- press every stitch line as you go before you cross over it with another seam. Nasty to get in there and smooth out seams that cross after they're constructed. And how would I know?

As far as any method that is working well for you, aren't you smart to figure it out! Pin the way that gets results you like.

------
Always keep your words soft and sweet, just in case you have to eat them. Andy Rooney

Pfonzie- my honey Pfaff Creative Performance, Bernina 930 and 830, Evolution serger.

HanPanda
star
HanPanda
Intermediate
Member since 4/27/08
Posts: 945
Send Message

      



Subject: What does pulling threads & clipping threads mean? Date: 4/5/13 2:58 PM

When I pin things at houses that have wall to wall carpeting, I stab the pins through to pin it to the carpeteven if you pinned regularly your pattern piece would get holes, so I don't see the problem :3

------
2014 resolution: keep track of sewn yardage!!
In: 90 yards
Sewn: 46.5 yards

I'll try anything once :)

Please excuse my typos...sometimes it is harder to go back and edit on mobile than it is worth!

solosmocker
starstarstar
solosmocker
Advanced
NY USA
Member since 1/23/06
Posts: 1439
Send Message

      



Subject: What does pulling threads & clipping threads mean? Date: 4/5/13 4:21 PM

Pulling threads is what you do to establish proper grainline before laying out your pattern and cutting. Pulling threads is also used for various machine and hand stitches such as the pin stitch or hem stitch.

Clipping threads is just that, cutting those threads back to the fabric on the start and stop of each seam. This is not something you want to save until later as it is just too messy. It also needs to happen before you sew any cross seams.

------
http://lasewist.blogspot.com/

cakemix
cakemix
Advanced Beginner
Member since 12/23/11
Posts: 65
Send Message

      



In reply to solosmocker <<


Date: 4/5/13 5:11 PM

Thanks for all the responses.
I understand now about clipping threads.

I always have clipped threads as I go along- never thought it was a consideration not to

Anyway- I'm still trying to understand pulling threads. I don't know this.

thanks all again

Lynnelle
starstarstar
Lynnelle  Friend of PR
Intermediate
MI USA
Member since 4/8/07
Posts: 2491
Board Moderator
Send Message

      



Subject: Topic moved Date: 4/5/13 7:17 PM

This topic has been moved from Creative Sewing to Sewing Techniques and Tips

GlButterfly

GlButterfly
Intermediate
CA USA
Member since 8/28/08
Posts: 3044
Send Message

      



Date: 4/5/13 7:49 PM

By pulling threads, they might also mean to pull the thread through to the wrong side, tie both ends in a knot, then clip the tails. The meaning wouild depend on the context in which it was used.

------
That's Gl = for Gloria, not G. I.

CM_Sews
CM_Sews
Intermediate
CA USA
Member since 9/18/04
Posts: 1739
Send Message

      



In reply to GlButterfly <<


Date: 4/5/13 8:22 PM

Quote: GlButterfly
By pulling threads, they might also mean to pull the thread through to the wrong side, tie both ends in a knot, then clip the tails. The meaning wouild depend on the context in which it was used.

This gives a very clean finish to the line of stitching.

You might find the "pull through to the back, knot, and clip" technique specified for a line of stitching that shows on the outside of the garment: any line of top stitching, the stitching around a zipper installation. In these cases, back stitching might interfere with the clean line of the visible stitching. If you are top stitching in "cramped quarters" any back stitching can be "off" and rather noticeable.

For example, rather than using back stitching to lock threads at the beginning and end of a line of top stitching, you would just start and end your line of top stitching, leaving needle and bobbin tail threads free. Then, pull the needle thread to the back, knot the needle thread and the bobbin thread, then trim.

When I use this technique, I sometimes bury the thread tails between the layers of fabric before trimming. This is a habit I picked up from quilting and certainly isn't required.

CMC
Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Sewing Techniques and Tips >> What does 'pulling threads' & 'clipping threads' mean?

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Clone Your Favorite Garment
Clone Your Favorite Garment

Register

Restyling with Exposed Zippers
Restyling with Exposed Zippers

Register

Vogue Patterns 7607

photo
by: yummymummy...

Review
You Sew Girl Panel Bag

You Sew Girl Panel Bag

Buy Now
Sewing Workshop Hong Kong Vest Pattern

Sewing Workshop Hong Kong Vest Pattern

Buy Now
Butterick 5638

photo
by: ggf2005

Review

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.