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Would you ever lend out your sewing "tools"?
DonnaH
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DonnaH
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Date: 7/2/13 5:18 PM

(Not sure if this is the right place - any mods who want to move it, go ahead)

The discussion about lending sewing machines here got me thinking about the other tools we use.

Would you ever let anyone borrow your "tools" (other than the machines) - scissors, rotary cutter, pins, needles, bobbins, measuring devices, etc.? Under what circumstances?

One person (in the lending a machine thread) mentioned specifically that she once (and only once) brought along scissors and a Rowenta iron to a church sewing group - and others didn't treat them properly. Another poster mentioned super-sharp Japanese pins that got mixed in w/ crap pins because someone "just grabbed them" to pin another person's project.

Growing up, I knew that sewing (i.e., fabric) scissors were only for fabric, but most people I know would never get that. Except for the people I know here, lol. To people who weren't taught about fabric scissors, they are just scissors, and as such can be used to cut anything (paper, flower stems, fingernails, chicken bones, whatever). Maybe a hairstylist would understand, since they invest in specialized scissors, too.

It seems to me that many adults just never learned to respect other people's property - or to follow instructions on how such property (tools) needs to be used and treated.

KathySews
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Date: 7/2/13 5:55 PM

Like your stories, I have learned over time not to lend out or bring any tools that I cannot bear to lose.

And, the people I know who sew have so many tools and gadgets they don't need mine.

Marge99
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Marge99
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Date: 7/2/13 6:46 PM

At my previous job I was the equipment custodian. Once you've seen how barbarically people treat even expensive electronic equipment, you realise that a dainty pair of sharp-pointed scissors doesn't have a snowball's chance in hell out there.

I feel like a horrible ungenerous person when I don't want to lend people things, but unfortunately I have learned the hard way. You can treasure something for decades, but lend it out once and it will be returned damaged or not at all.

Too many people were taught throwaway values and just don't get the concepts of proper use, care and storage.

tourist
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In reply to DonnaH <<
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Date: 7/2/13 6:55 PM

I didn't really, really understand about scissors being dropped until my hairdresser told me about it. Not that I went around dropping them for fun, but I did not understand how it could throw them so out of whack - permanently. Now, I do have a fussy hairdresser who claims to not like her scissors as much even after they have been sharpened.

No, I don't really lend tools except maybe at a sewing get together where I know everyone well enough and even then, only while we are together. It helps that, aside from scissors and machines, you can often jury rig or "hack" (as the kids say now) something instead of buying or borrowing fancy notions.

Which reminds me that I used to use a venetian blind slat as a straight edge before I got my nice yard stick!

------
http://bgballroom.wordpress.com to follow the progress on my next ballgown.

lelliebunny
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Date: 7/2/13 8:53 PM

If I am sitting there with the person in a class, sure.

I almost never have anybody actually borrow my scissors or rotary cutter because I'm left handed & have the blade reversed on the rotary cutter and true left handed scissors.

------
it doesn't matter what type of sewing you do. you are sewing, and sewing is good.

Terri A
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In reply to tourist <<


Date: 7/2/13 9:42 PM

Quote: tourist
I didn't really, really understand about scissors being dropped until my hairdresser told me about it. Not that I went around dropping them for fun, but I did not understand how it could throw them so out of whack - permanently. Now, I do have a fussy hairdresser who claims to not like her scissors as much even after they have been sharpened.



No, I don't really lend tools except maybe at a sewing get together where I know everyone well enough and even then, only while we are together. It helps that, aside from scissors and machines, you can often jury rig or "hack" (as the kids say now) something instead of buying or borrowing fancy notions.



Which reminds me that I used to use a venetian blind slat as a straight edge before I got my nice yard stick!

Bwaahaha that's awesome! I've used bowls, tupperware lids, and pretty much any household items that would fit the bill. Venetian blinds would work perfectly.

No one would want to borrow my tools (aside from my sewing machines) except for my steam iron which was returned in good condition. On occasion, for brand new sewers, I will make up a gift bag. You know how you end up with extra notions and stuff? Sometimes, I will make a clean sweep of my sewing area and give a variety of new but unused notions and fabric to practice on. My family heirloom Gingher pinking shears will never leave my possession.
I'm afraid to have them sharpened

After reading everyone's comments I am leaning toward gifting. Whatever it may be. Better than lending maybe?

The only time this backfired was when I spent waaayy too much time looking for some nice quality clear elastic that I was sure I had! Probably in one of those bags...
katlew03
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Date: 7/2/13 10:42 PM

I would never loan my machines to an inexperienced sewer unless I was right there observing. Almost all of them "floorboard" the foot control and sew over pins, even when they try to be careful. When someone keeps saying, "sorry" every time the machine starts sewing at 90 mph, I know they have no control over the machine. I agree with those who have commented on things being returned broken or in poor condition, if they are returned at all. Accidents happen, and I would hate to ruin a friendship if something got broken or lost and the friend got defensive. I would be glad to help someone learn to sew, but the machine would stay under my supervision.

I do a lot of charity sewing and often get asked if I'll do a repair. Sometimes I say yes, but usually it is no. Depends on the circumstances. I always say it will take awhile because I am so busy--true. Nonsewers have no idea how long it takes to replace a zipper in a pair of pants with a fly front. . . . .or that I don't enjoy doing their repairs in my "spare" time.

So, it all comes down to how comfortable you are lending out machines or equipment or making repairs for someone else. If not, a simple, "no, I'm sorry but I can't." is all that is necessary. The more you try to excuse yourself, the more some people will try to change your mind.

------
Sewn in 2012: 176.212 yds.
2013 Goal: 400 yds (again)
Total sewn in 2013 -- 225.848 yds.
Total yards in inventory 1/1/14 -- 1752.5
Goal for 2014 -- 400 yards (for the third time)

Machines: Designer Diamond, #1+, H Class 100Q, and Viking 400 Serger: 936

BriarRose
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Date: 7/2/13 10:48 PM

You can send your beloved scissors to the Gingher factory for resharpening. I wouldn't dream of letting anyone else touch my Ginghers!

http://www.gingher.com/pages/sharpening-and-repair-service/4/

I'm afraid I am not generous with my tools. My best equipment stays home in my studio.
-- Edited on 7/2/13 10:48 PM --

------
I've quit fighting my inner demons. We're on the same side now.

It's just fabric; we can out-think it.

Terri A
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In reply to BriarRose <<


Date: 7/2/13 11:37 PM

Really? I am afraid they will lose them or send back some other pair... (Fretting)

Kwaaked
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Subject: Would you ever lend out your sewing tools? Date: 7/3/13 0:01 AM

Gingher takes really good care of them. A tailor's point came back in better shape then they went in and the guy stuck a note in it that he buffed a scratch out for me. I have no fear sending them there.

As to the rest, nope. Now, my mom uses them but it's not fair because I am over there daily.

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