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Message Board > Machine Embroidery > Self-Diagnosing "minor" Problems ( Moderated by Pyrose)

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Self-Diagnosing "minor" Problems
How far into your machine do you go?
schmammy
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schmammy  Friend of PR
TX USA
Member since 12/5/06
Posts: 758
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Date: 7/12/13 10:05 AM

While stitching out a relatively light design with 8 color changes, I had multiple upper thread problems. Snipped from the spool, the thread pulled easily from the needle. I'm thinking there's a build-up of lint somewhere in the thread route. Even with my tiny vacuum accessories, I can only reach so far in there and I don't want to disturb critical contacts by poking around.

So, how safe is it for me to remove a screw or two and have a look? I've done this on lower level machines but haven't had the nerve to try it on this one.

------
Indecision may or may not be my problem. -Jimmy Buffet

http://chihuahuaonmylap.blogspot.com/

quiltingwolf
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quiltingwolf  Friend of PR
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In reply to schmammy <<


Date: 7/12/13 10:33 AM

I wouldn't do it. The way I look at the expensive embroidery machines that if you afford to buy it you can afford to take it in for service. You might cause more problems by poking around. There is a certain method to troubleshooting stuff that trained techs know to follow when working on anything. You might take out a screw and 3 other parts fall out and you have no idea where to put them back out. Take it to a tech especially if you machine hasn't had any serviced in a year.

One thing you might try is take a piece of unwaxed dental floss through the threading path of your machine, then pull it through if something is stuck it might pull it out. Other then that see above.

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quiltingwolf.blogspot.com

Addierecoy
Addierecoy  Friend of PR
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MO USA
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In reply to schmammy <<


Date: 7/12/13 11:06 AM

I agree, don't do it. Just try the floss.

And this is coming from someone who will tear into a mechanical machine with aplomb. While they are ridiculously reliable, these machines are also miracles of a thousand different parts (mostly computer controlled) working together. It's real easy to mess one up and have to head to the service man anyway.

CdnSkier
CdnSkier  Friend of PR
IL USA
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In reply to schmammy <<


Date: 7/12/13 12:25 PM

If your machine is still under warranty (many have 5-10 yr warranties on electrical, etc.) you will void the warranty by opening the housing yourself. Not worth whatever the cost of a basic service is.

------
Baby Lock Ellure Plus (BLR3), Pfaff Creative 4874 serger/coverstitch, Singer Rocketeer 500J, Singer 301A short-bed

"A woman is like a tea bag- you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

"Great minds discuss ideas; Average minds discuss events; Small minds discuss people." Eleanor Roosevelt

AK
AK
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CA USA
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Date: 7/12/13 3:25 PM

For the most part, I agree that it is unwise to poke around. I do have one exception. On most the machines I've owned, the left end which covers the threading path is hinged to open. On my Janome 9500, it is held closed with a screw. I have taken that screw out, but only because I was certain that all it would do was remove that end piece. If you aren't absolutely sure, try dental floss or a folded piece of paper.

aslinnd

aslinnd
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thumbsup 1 member likes this.
Subject: Self-Diagnosing minor Problems Date: 7/12/13 7:04 PM

If your problem is not computer related or design related -like some of the berninas or pfaff's awaiting parts or upgrades, and your machine has performed the way it should up till now - then I wouldn't open it up. Mainly because its still likely to be something obvious that you just aren't seeing.

I just made the jump to a ten needle and was doing my second big stitch out one colour thread broke about 4 times , I checked the threading I pulled more thread through checked the thread path with a small flash light each time. 4 times and what didin't I do ? I didn't peak under to look at the bobbin thread there was a small knot and it was caught. The machine says check both but I was so convinced I could see the thread shredding it had to be upper threading.

If you know your machine then generally trust there are only a certain number of things it is likely to be walk away and have a cuppa get the manual trouble shooting and try again. I agree about floss and lint though you can generally tackle those youself without opening it up.

kkkkaty
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kkkkaty  Friend of PR
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Date: 7/12/13 7:07 PM

Libby Lehman suggests a pipe cleaner to try and get lint out of the tension area. I don't think that would hurt anything. Doesn't mean poking it around, use it like a stiffer piece of dental floss

------
Viking Lily 545
Viking Ruby
Bernina Activa 210
Brother 1034d

schmammy
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schmammy  Friend of PR
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Date: 7/13/13 4:43 PM

Dang, you guys! No fun at all!

Oh well, my gut was saying the same thing. Will try the dental floss routine, then let the expert take it from there, if needed.

------
Indecision may or may not be my problem. -Jimmy Buffet

http://chihuahuaonmylap.blogspot.com/

beauturbo
beauturbo
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In reply to schmammy <<


Date: 7/13/13 10:25 PM

I might also try to self diagnose the actual embroidery design instead, particular if you use same needle, same thread and some embroidery design built into the sewing machine instead sews out just fine. Because if that happens, then nothing wrong with the machine and something not that great about the embroidery design instead. Same thing if it is an embroidery and sewing machine, if you just take off the embroidery bed part and it still sews a straight stitch seam fine with same needle and thread, then you know it's not the machine either and really the embroidery design.

The way I would probably do that is to open the embroidery design in some embroidery kind of software, and just look at it there, and have it measure the stitches there, or see if any were all stacked up on top of each other in one place. If so, and that is the place your thread really breaks in the embroidery design then you know why. At that point you could just grab and move some of those stitches a bit farther away from each other, or some software even has a function it will even let you set up some parameters in it, and delete some too many, too small stitches more automatic even.

I don't think it really matters if it's a light density embroidery design or a heavy one, in that all it takes to actually shred and break thread thread most times, or even needles sometimes, is just enough stitches all stacked up in one little tiny place in an embroidery design and not really even all over it at all.

schmammy
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schmammy  Friend of PR
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In reply to beauturbo <<


Date: 7/14/13 10:34 AM

Very interesting thinking...
I haven't yet connected it to the thread breaks, but there are several places in the design where the stitches bunch up in an otherwise straight line. For example, the "steam" lines rising from a cup of coffee. I had already decided to study those places with my editing software to see what could be done to keep the stitching more consistent. Having read your idea, I will also look for other areas where they stack up on top of each other.
Thanks, beaut!

------
Indecision may or may not be my problem. -Jimmy Buffet

http://chihuahuaonmylap.blogspot.com/

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