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Interfacing idea, probably crazy
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UNITED KINGDOM
Member since 7/19/13
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Date: 8/7/13 2:44 PM

I'm having trouble sourcing material for my next jacket. The design I really like (small polka dots) I have only found on a cotton poplin, of which I now have samples.

Here's an idea, probably absolutely mad. But then again, it may be do-able?

Three metres of that fabric, right.
I buy three metres of lightweight fusible interfacing, and fuse the lot to the poplin. Then I cut it out. (Or, just fuse every cut piece: the sequence is not the point, really.)

Thus I have my cotton jacket fabric, in a slightly heavier weight. What's to go wrong?

The next jacket will be lined, if that helps. So, I'll need more interfacing on the collar etc., but I could add some other interfacing to those pieces?

Has anyone ever tried this, or am I completely crazy?

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UNITED KINGDOM
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Date: 8/7/13 3:11 PM

Look what I just found:

http://www.sewsweetness.com/2011/09/sewing-back-to-school-interfacing.html

The Pellon SF-101 interfacing will not make your fabric stiff, but it will lend it more body. For example, when ironed on to a quilting-weight/mid-weight cotton fabric, the fabric will now have the body of a decor-weight fabric.

and

This interfacing can be used by itself, or in combination with other interfacings. For example, you can have one layer of Pellon SF-101, followed by a layer of Pellon Thermolam (more on that later). The reason that the Pellon SF-101 gets fused to your actual fabric first is that it provides a nice, smooth base, since it is woven like your actual fabric probably is.

I'm homing in on a fabric-sourcing solution?

Mole Princess
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Date: 8/7/13 6:13 PM

It might work, but you may want to get an iron with a no-hole sole plate so that you don't end up with any unfused area. A steam iron's holes means you have to shift the iron precisely to get complete fusing.

Also, you'll want to time everything etc. to the nth degree of accuracy.

I am a little suspicious about whether interfacing will stay evenly fused absolutely forever, but it's a jacket, so it won't be in the wash all the time . . .

You'll definitely want to test a sample and preferably subject it to whatever cleaning method you'll be using--dry clean or whatever . . . before you sew . . .

Let us know!

P.S. I know I've seen those smooth irons around--you could try Joann--crafters do sometimes want them--online??
-- Edited on 8/7/13 6:14 PM --

BrendaR
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Date: 8/7/13 6:35 PM

Isn't cotton poplin heavy enough for a jacket? What's the recommended fabric? That being said, I would not fuse the whole body of jacket. I might underline the pieces with cotton/poly broadcloth, or silk organza, whichever is close to but never heavier than your fabric. You can double up the layers on collars. I am not a fan of fusibles unless for detail work. It tends to bubble after dry cleaning, and can even get re-stuck in the wrong places. (but must say that the SF 101 mentioned--a former Stacy product--is a very good one. I'd use it for a pillow or handbag, but not really for large areas of clothing).

marymary86
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Date: 8/7/13 9:45 PM

You could ask Pam Erny for a recommendation. She manufactures and sells great interfacing of different weights and she often posts here.

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Mary


PattyE
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Date: 8/8/13 1:27 AM

It would not be much different than using stabile or Sulky product on a loosely woven boucle. I have done that and it worked fine. I fused the entire yardage and then cut out my pattern. I also did it on a cotton twill that I wanted to be heavier to use with a jean jacket pattern.

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BriarRose
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Date: 8/8/13 1:34 AM

I'm not a big fan of fusible anything but I have completely underlined (as opposed to lined) garments to give the fabric more body. It works well.

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I've quit fighting my inner demons. We're on the same side now.

It's just fabric; we can out-think it.

tinflutterby
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Date: 8/8/13 2:27 AM

I know Marta Alto recommends it for this purpose as well as making linen less wrinkley. You do need to be careful with the fusing - I use a damp press cloth when I need to fuse large areas.

petro
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Date: 8/8/13 2:27 AM

Underlining or mounting the fabric on another is a regular technique. You can use a fusible like this, but all the caveats given above apply. I'm not wild about fusibles, though I do use them sometimes. I've used full interlining quite frequently. You have to be very sure that the fabrics will all behave the same when laundered or cleaned.

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http://patternpandemonium.wordpress.com/

jacquiJB
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Date: 8/8/13 2:43 AM

You can absolutely do this. Fusing the entire piece of fabric before cutting is called block fusing. You can do it yourself, or you can take it to a specialist. I don't know whether a good dry cleaner will do it for you (it's not like they don't have the equipment for it). For example: Miss Celie on Block Fusing.

From my point of view, interfacing the entire length of fabric would be a lot less fiddly than doing each piece individually.

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