SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Platinum Sponsor
PatternReview.com
PatternReview.com

Forum > Sergers, Coverstitch and Blindhemmers > Sergers? ( Moderated by CarolynGM, Deepika)

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
Sergers?
craftEcowgirl
craftEcowgirl
Advanced Beginner
Member since 7/31/13
Posts: 37
Send Message

      



Date: 10/15/13 1:58 PM

I have a new Pfaff sewing machine that I am using to make quilts. I would like to make some basic clothes, and some purses/bags. Do I need a Serger to make these items? What are benefits of one? What all can they do?

Also what sergers are the best/easiest to use? Heard the Babylocks are so easy to thread.

------
Sharonkay
Pfaff Performance 5.0
Beginner quilter/sewer
Been cross stitching for over 30 years (hobby+work)

frame
star
frame
USA
Member since 2/19/04
Posts: 3726
Send Message

      



In reply to craftEcowgirl <<
thumbsup 1 member likes this.


Date: 10/15/13 2:12 PM

You never "need" a serger. People who sew have done so for years without a serger. Most of the people here who have been sewing for years, did so without owning a serger.

That said, all you have to do is scroll through the topics under the Serger, Coverstitch Header and you will find tons of information on sergers. It is a discussion that begins and ends almost daily. Have fun with your research.

------
"framed" was taken
"I meant what I said, and I said what I meant." - Horton(Dr. Seuss)

SewLibra
star
SewLibra  Friend of PR
Intermediate
California USA
Member since 12/2/08
Posts: 714
Send Message

      
thumbsup 2 members like this.



Date: 10/16/13 1:02 AM

Sergers are awesome and give a professional look to your projects, plus the seam edges do not ravel even with washings. They not only cut and overcast your edges like RTW, but also do a rolled hem, gathering, and many other tasks. Even if you only use a serger for finishing inside seams, it is worth it! The best deal out there right now, if you don't want to spend a lot, is the Brother 1034D for about $200. Yes, the Babylocks with the air threading are fabulous, but super, super expensive. I had a Janome serger for nine years that still works great, but so hard to thread. A few months ago I got the Brother 1034D with the easy lower looper threading and it is so time-saving! You might try the Brother to see if you even like using a serger before spending thousands of dollars on a Babylock.

------
SewLibra
Brother SB4138, Bernina 1008, Brother 1034D, Janome Harmony 9102D

SandiMacD
star
SandiMacD  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Florida USA
Member since 2/8/09
Posts: 2564
Send Message

      
thumbsup 1 member likes this.



Date: 10/16/13 5:14 AM

The benefits are nicely finished seam edges. But sergers rarely handle the intersecting seam bumps and thickness with varying layers and corners that some purses require. That all depends on your model so test drive them against what you normally sew.

A serger is a compliment to a sm. It makes sewing knits a breeze- you can do seams in much less time with less effort. Same with piping and puffing gathers but I think a sm does deep ruffling and pleating much better. You can stop turn and pivot, usually with ease. A serger doing an overlock stitch doesn't pivot corners like that. Some pivot a rolled hem corner corner nicely. There are sergers that have a cover stitch for hemming while a sm uses a twin needle for that double row effect.

I would agree to start with the entry level Brother off Amazon and as you gain experience and understanding you can trade up or save for a BL. Unless you have money to throw to the wind- get a BL. There are lots of good deals due to the newly released model. I have the Evolution serger now so I am a bit biased towards BL.

------
sewing brings joy and meaning to my life...

aprilla
aprilla
Beginner
Member since 6/2/12
Posts: 367
Send Message

      



Date: 10/16/13 5:57 AM

I got one after sewing a short while. Not saying reading about them here influenced me at all, nah!, but.... I just got intrigued so selected the popular Brother 1034D to see what it could do for me. Not too costly and uses the same needles and thread as sewing machine.

I really love it Does it benefit me? Yes and no. It certainly isn't necessary for my bits of garment making, home dec, dog beds.... but it makes some of those jobs tidier, faster and just more fun.

Garments have nice seam finishes with little effort (which I could do by sewing machine or just pinking). but you do need to be sure it fits first, serger seams are finished seams, you can unpick, but won't want to ;)
With knit fabric it is a bonus to have the serger. You just don't have to fiddle with the sewing machine tensions and needles etc... easier, not essential.
My first experiment was taking in one, then several knit t-shirts that were too big for me, a great success, just serging up the side seams, but was like getting a whole new wardrobe.

Home dec (cushions/window seat, table mats, stuff like that) Again seams are very clean and nice to see (ditto above) and I've had no problems serging three layers of good quality, heavy jacquard upholstery fabric. It's a fun way to do soft ruffles, and I've done some piping with it too, though I get piping a little closer with the sewing machine and a zipper foot I'm planning doing more kitchen stuffs with rolled hems, soon...

Dog Beds (just cushions really) (ditto above) and if I have fabric to hand I can whizz up a couple of these in under an hour with just my scissor, serger and iron (optional but nice), using an envelope back :)

In all cases above the main thing I can think of is nice seams, clean lines... fast and fun.
I have serged curves but with something small, like bits of a bag might be, it could be a little tricky. However the edges could be serged first then sewn together giving a nice finish.

Serger? Not essential, but really fun.

The Brother 1034D uses 3 or 4 needles. Some machines do 2 or 3 or 4 needles, check that out first to see if the 2 needle option would be an advantage for your plans.

You will probably want to get Fray Check, it's an easy way to secure the cut threads which will ravel if not finished in some way.

If you invest DO NOT serge with pins nearby (ask me how I know)

Mary Hayes
Mary Hayes
Advanced
Arizona USA
Member since 3/19/12
Posts: 63
Send Message

      



In reply to craftEcowgirl <<


Date: 10/16/13 10:50 AM

I can agree with everyone else on- you don't have to have a serger. But I wish I could Of had one when My kids were growing up. I had my first serger 30 years ago,it was so hard to set the tention. now I have the self threading babylock. I also have an inexpensive "singer" serger that I use when Using unique/ or thick threads or yarns. I love having a serger when sewing silky materials. Everyone is right, it is wonderful for knits. and finishing regular seams.I bought mine(singer) at wal mart and it was inexpensive.
This way you can find out if you like it. and if you don't ,you did'nt pay a fortune. Also Nancys notion has a good book and dvd. also Palmer and Pletch for learning a serger,buy the dvd. too.

------
Normal is nothing more than a cycle on a washing machine. -whoopi goldberg

kitphantom
kitphantom  Friend of PR
Advanced
New Mexico USA
Member since 1/6/11
Posts: 234
Send Message

      



Date: 10/16/13 11:10 AM

Is a serger absolutely necessary? No, but it sure is a great addition to the tool box. I learned to sew without one, lo those many years ago. I got my first serger in the late '80s. a Singer that was not the most user-friendly. I finally got too frustrated with it, and bought a Bernette 004D, which I still have, about 20 years later. (I gave the Singer to a friend, with the caveat that it might not actually be a nice thing to be given. I don't think she ever conquered it.) I have used it so much it will soon need to be replaced.
I occasionally use it to make knit tops, but it is used mostly for edges before washing yardage or dyeing fabric, finishing seams, and the like. I have put it to some pretty hard use at times, such as a bunch of projects for our previous camper, which included seam finishing lots of canvas and heavy fabrics. I just had it serviced and the wonderful tech has it close to purring again, but I will be keeping an eye out for either a new one or a gently used trade-in. More than likely I will be choosing a Bernina, unless a Baby Lock is demonstrated to be far superior. For my uses, I don't need a TOL model, whatever brand.

------
Bernina: 910, 930, 180, 440
Bernina 1150MDA
Bernette 004D serger
Vintage/classic Singer: 201, 301, 221

nestle
nestle  Friend of PR
Intermediate
California USA
Member since 6/30/11
Posts: 62
Send Message

      



Date: 10/16/13 1:14 PM

I have a Juki 634. I got in in '86 or '87 because my husband got a big bonus check and is very generous, and the world's best sewing machine salesman convinced me I couldn't live without it. It is still working perfectly and I have never had to fiddle with the tension. I seriously think they made it self-adjusting and never said so! it's a pain to thread but after all these years I certainly know how, probably asleep in the dark. If you could grab one of these old Juki's you could learn Serging and spend very little. I hope to keep mine forever.

allorache
allorache  Friend of PR
Advanced Beginner
Oregon USA
Member since 12/10/11
Posts: 329
Send Message

      



Date: 10/16/13 4:09 PM

I am a beginning sewer and even more of a beginning serger user, but I love it. You'll get tons of other examples here but I just did a very simple 2-layered burp cloth for the grandbaby. One layer flannel and the other PUL. Instead of overcasting the edges, sewing inside out, pushing it right side out and then finishing off the hole through which I turned it right side out, I just glue basted the 2 layers together (search the boards here for some posts on glue basting; SO handy) and did a rolled hem all the way around. Just took a couple of minutes and voila, edges finished and both sides sewn together in 2 shakes of a lamb's tail. Starting with a Babylock was definitely an indulgence, but in my view worth every penny -- so easy to learn and to use.

------
New Ovation!! Now a Babylock girl almost all the way - Ellegante 3, Evolution, and Melody. Plus a Sailrite LSZ-1 for those heavy duty projects

DonnaH
star
DonnaH
Intermediate
Texas USA
Member since 10/1/03
Posts: 1318
Send Message

      
thumbsup 1 member likes this.



Date: 10/16/13 5:14 PM

I agree with the others here. You can sew perfectly nice garments w/out a serger. But...

It really is the easiest way to finish seams. And I love using it on yardage before I prewash. If the project has a bunch of mostly straight seams, you will get through it FAST. (If you don't like to sew fast, you may be a bit scared by serging!)

If you make kids' clothes that will need to be altered several times, finish/serge the edges (make sure you still mark all the notches, etc.) first - then put the pieces together using a regular sewing machine. This is how the costume shops I worked in did it.

I have a 1034D, and love it. I am really cheap, though so YMMV, lol.

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Sergers, Coverstitch and Blindhemmers >> Sergers?

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Online Class
Expert Sewing Techniques for Jackets
Expert Sewing Techniques for Jackets

Class Details

Online Class
Beginners Guide to Sewing Jackets
Beginners Guide to Sewing Jackets

Class Details

Vogue Patterns 2091

photo
by: mimi g.

Review
ADVANCED SLEEVE - A CD Book by Kenneth King

ADVANCED SLEEVE - A CD Book by Kenneth King

More Info
Sewing Workshop Chicago Jacket

Sewing Workshop Chicago Jacket

More Info

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.