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Wool Bump Fabric for Pressing Board
Anyone ever used this?
Barbara3
Barbara3  Friend of PR
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Date: 11/7/13 12:52 PM

Searching for more ideas about making my own pressing board, I happened to come across one of Martha Stewart's online videos. She used 3/4 inch plywood, covered with 2 layers of (cotton or wool) felt, a layer of wool bump, and then a top cover of muslin. She used a staple gun to attach each layer. For finishing and covering the edges of the stapled fabrics on the underside of the board, she attached cotton twill tape all the way around the board with fabric glue.

Here's the video, but in case it doesn't work,
Here's her process in an article format.

The wool bump was quite dense and looked like a perfect material for this purpose. Anyone ever used it or know where it can be purchased?

annsew65
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annsew65
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Date: 11/7/13 2:27 PM

I've heard of bump cloth - I think on one of her shows a few years ago, but it wasn't used on an ironing surface. I made my own larger pressing surface that sits on the counter to the left of my sewing machine. I used a well felted woolen army blanket to pad my board - two layers of it. If you can get one of these heavy blankets, wash it in hot water with a good bit of agitation to get it felted and dry it in the dryer - further felting it. I stretched it over the surface and stapled it on, then covered it with cotton drill - also stapled on. I've unstapled the drill a couple of times to put clean fabric on it. I love the board for pressing as I sew and it's long enough to even press pants while doing the construction. I glued about 6 or 8 wooden blocks on the bottom of the board and covered them with felt to prevent the staples from scratching the formica on the countertop. I really like wool for the padding - it absorbs the steam really well.

------
Sewing in Wild, Wonderful West Virginia
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Barbara3
Barbara3  Friend of PR
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In reply to annsew65 <<


Date: 11/7/13 3:42 PM

Thanks! I've been calling around for wool bump locally, with no luck, but one fabric store carries cotton bump and the salesperson has used it for this purpose. Cotton doesn't sound heavy or dense enough to me.

The army surplus store salesperson said that the blankets they carry are mostly, but not 100%, wool. And another fabric store salesperson suggested using some of their roll end (discounted) wool coating, but couldn't guarantee that coating labeled wool would be 100% wool. Maybe a product that is mostly wool will work okay too, but I like the idea of 100% wool.

I remember your sewing room well - it's lovely! And the idea to put felt-covered feet on the bottom of the board is a great one. I was thinking of using the twill tape suggested in that article I linked to cover the staples, and then placing a thin layer of rubber mesh drawer liner hidden underneath the board to keep it in place and further protect the table surface.

Edited to ask: what did you use for the board material?
-- Edited on 11/7/13 4:03 PM --

tinflutterby
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Date: 11/8/13 1:40 AM

I have a hollow core door that I have used for several years now. One side is set up for pressing and the other side I used contact cement to attach a cutting mat. The door is beginning to sag in the center but it was just $25 and is sturdy but light. I'll probably make a new one once it becomes to worn. I think I've had it 4 years. I used a square to mark straight and bias lines on the pressing side with a sharpie.

annsew65
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Date: 11/8/13 3:24 AM

We used tempered Masonite for my board. It is thinner and not as heavy as plywood, but has held up well. It is a piece that DH had left over from some project and I don't even know if it is still available. He had had it for quite some time when we decided to use it. Another reason for the "feet" on the board was to give it air space and not get the formica underneath too hot while using it. Good luck with your pressing board. They are sooooo convenient. When I have a large tablecloth to press, I move it over to my cutting cabinet (it's higher and the tablecloth doesn't drag on the floor as bad) to iron them. Loads of reasons to make them sort of portable.

------
Sewing in Wild, Wonderful West Virginia
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Queendom

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In reply to Barbara3 <<
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Date: 11/10/13 11:08 AM

Barbara3,

I owned a drapery workroom for several years. Bump is used widely in Europe for its thick, heavy interlining capabilities in draperies. Used here for upscale custom draperies. I have many pieces large enough for your project and will be happy to give it to you, no charge. Just let me know.

------
Sandra
Whatever You Can Do, or Dream You Can, Begin it, Boldness has Genious, Power and Magic in it. - Goethe

Barbara3
Barbara3  Friend of PR
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In reply to Queendom <<


Date: 11/10/13 1:50 PM

That is so very kind of you. I have a couple of questions, and will PM you.

MartiP
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Date: 11/10/13 3:15 PM

To the best my knowledge bump oringinated in England, and is used to interline window drapery. It provides great insulation againt cold as well as noise. I have made drapery for a client using it, and the fibercontent was rayon and cotton. You may have some luck finding it from a drapery supply business, or through an interior designer.

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MartiP

Ruckertt's Law; There is nothing so small that it can't be blown out of proportion.

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kgomez
kgomez
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In reply to Queendom <<


Date: 4/27/14 11:58 AM

Hello, I just came upon this post as I was looking online to obtain some wool bump. Do you still have some available? I would like to make a wide ironing board to be able to iron my vintage linens.
Thank you for your help! Kathy

Queendom

Queendom
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In reply to kgomez <<


Date: 4/29/14 10:48 AM

Sure, I'll be happy to help you. how much do you need?

Sandra

------
Sandra
Whatever You Can Do, or Dream You Can, Begin it, Boldness has Genious, Power and Magic in it. - Goethe

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