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Forum > Sewing Machines > Should a computerised machine last longer than 10 years? ( Moderated by Sharon1952, EleanorSews)

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Should a computerised machine last longer than 10 years?
stitchwitch
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stitchwitch
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Date: 11/28/13 3:59 PM

My Janome Memorycraft 4800, bought in 2002, has stopped working, coming up with the message error #1. The engineer at the local shop said it would cost me 250 - 300 to get it repaired and that ten years is about the life of such a machine. I would like another computerised machine but am loathe to buy another Janome, or indeed spend a fortune on any other model if it will date that quickly.

Just wondering what your experience of this might be and whether you have any thoughts on the matter?

Wendy

mastdenman
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Date: 11/28/13 4:22 PM

:( Mine is about 11 or 12 years old and still works. I don't see much on the internet except a recommendation that it might be a threading error. They suggest you check the thread guides and clean everything, then rethread and try it again. They also suggest making sure no thread is stuck in the bobbin area.
-- Edited on 11/28/13 4:31 PM --

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Marilyn

January 2009 to January 2010 81 yards out and 71yards in January 2010 to the present 106.7 yards out and 146.5 yards in. January 2011 to the present: 47 yards out and 69 yards in.

LynnRowe
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In reply to stitchwitch <<
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Date: 11/28/13 4:23 PM

What's the average lifespan for a car? TV? Computer? Probably around the same, 10 years.

Some people will have their cars running fine for 20 years (like me) but a dead computer within 3 (like me).

Depends on the machine, the usage, the environment, your level of good vs bad luck...

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I heart Panzy, Pfaff Creative Performance, the sewing machine love of my life!
And Baby (Enlighten serger), Victor (BLCS), Rupert (Pfaff 2023-knits expert) Ash (B350SE-Artwork), Kee (B750QEE-Panzy's BFF), Georgie (B560-Kee's baby sister) and the Feather-Flock!

Most of all, I heart Woo (HimmyCat). Until we meet again, my beautiful little boy. I love you.

Brotherlover
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Date: 11/28/13 11:05 PM

I would say for a motherboard thgat sounds average

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lelliebunny
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Date: 11/29/13 0:31 AM

A motherboard shouldn't fail unless it is made with poor quality components, a problem occurs during production, or unless it is subjected to harsh conditions (ie. Excessive heat, excessive moisture). Circuit boards don't really just go bad.

In the case of computers, the problem is often caused by another component. As an example, the fan on a motherboard dies which causes the board to overheat and fry itself (happened to me twice - Apple had to replace the laptop because it was an issue with that particular model).

I'm not entirely convinced that some of the machine techs really understand how the computerized components function so they are quick to blame it on the motherboard when it might not really be the whole story.

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it doesn't matter what type of sewing you do. you are sewing, and sewing is good.

SewLibra
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Date: 11/29/13 0:37 AM

The life span of a dishwasher, clothes washer, dryer, and refrigerator are about 10 years, more if you are lucky. I think for a sewing machine it might depend on the amount of usage, but 10 years is not unreasonable if you use the heck out of it. I had a Viking computerized sm for 17 years and then it went out on me. Most dealers will give you a deal with a trade-in whether it works or not, thankfully! Think of it as a good thing that you have the best excuse EVER to buy a new machine! Try out all the brands and see what you like the best.

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SewLibra
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stitchwitch
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stitchwitch
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Date: 11/29/13 2:30 AM

This error has turned out to be a pain - I had tried the cleaning techniques but no luck and I hadn't thought about it in terms of other electronic equipment. I had naively thought that if I paid for a decent machine then, with luck, it would last. Kind of scuppers my plan to buy a quality machine that will sail into my retirement with me. I have hardly used the machine in the last 5 years because of work so I guess my luck wasn't in with this model.

Now to choose another machine - thinking it might be a Pfaff but I have to rethink my budget in light of our conversation.

Thank you for your thoughts.

Wendy

annem54
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In reply to stitchwitch <<
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Date: 11/29/13 4:15 AM

Another issue - my early semi-computerised Viking was unused for many years and when I started to use, after cleaning, its stitching was poor. I thought it was me. I took it for servicing - yes, the timing was out but the agent could not fix as they didn't have the appropriate now obsolete tools - that could have been dealt with by another agent who had been around longer - but, worse, there was uneven wear and uneven corrosion, obviously caused by sitting around. So fixing the timing wouldn't have solved the problem. Things age just sitting around - applies to machines as well as humans!
In addition, computer technology has improved so a motherboard today is not like a motherboard of old (mine was 30 years old). And I think that many agents - whether of sm or other see a motherboard as a 'black box' item not for repair but to replace if something goes wrong.
So, if/when you get a new sm, make sure you use it! Then it will last better

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beauturbo
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Date: 11/29/13 4:35 AM

I think so. I want mine to! But maybe not always with just never anything going wrong and probably not with out any lubrication either. Maybe just take it someplace else and get a 2nd opinion. I think things can fail on anything, any old time (a good example might be a hard disk in a computer) but even there, when things not working, could also be your motherboard, or even power supply, or lots of other stuff too. I think sometimes some little replaceable fuses on some circuit boards for some things, actually often fail before the board on anything does, and maybe even on purpose there, to save a board sometimes too.

My oldest working computerized machine is I think late 1980's something, Poem/Hyskygram/Singer EU kind of machine, but I have a 1990's Pfaff 1475 still running and also a maybe year 2000 or so Singer XL1000 machine still running, all with no electrical failures of any kind at all, and those are all older than 10 years old. Some people still run old computerized Singer's from the 1970's even. That would be maybe even 30 years. So I think no set period of time that something electrical always fails at all. It could be day 2 or day 2002, or just any day actually.

I think not using electrical things for long periods of time, does not particular "save them" for later at all though, I'm of the thoughts, that if something is supposed to be used, just using it is not going to particular make it fail at all, and sometimes not using something is worse for it, than really just using it too.

TeeGee

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In reply to stitchwitch <<
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Date: 11/29/13 7:30 AM

My Janome MC 6000 was manufactured in the early 1980s,it still works very well.I was told there are no new motherboards for those old models available.The good news,the MC 6000 motherboard can be repaired by a knowledgeable Janome sewing machine technician.

Many other good brand computerized sewing machines didn't last that long,they had to be repaired a long time ago, I read online.

250 - 300 is a lot of money for repairs.I would get a second opinion from another sewing machine repair technician.Can you buy the same good quality computerized sewing machine for that price,or a bit more ? It's something to think about. I can see a reconditioned Janome Memory Craft 4800 online for 199.00.

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