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Finishing edges on curved seams
Not french or felled, no serger
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UNITED KINGDOM
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Date: 1/19/14 2:52 PM

I should know this, but I seem to have forgotten. I have been frantically busy for the last 3? weeks and had to abandon sewing ftm.

I'm making a blouse and have just set the sleeves in. I don't have a serger. I want to finish those curved raw edges without any top stitching showing.

The other seams on this blouse I have finished by folding under each seam allowance and machine stitching. There are no french seams or felled seams in this blouse. If it helps, another one I made previously, I stitched both raw edges of the armhole seams together underneath, but when laundering it, they fray; I'd like another solution this time around, ideally.

Sorry to bother you all with such a simple query from me: other real life events seem to have wiped some sewing knowledge from my brain.

Thanks in advance.


edited to add: The sleeves were set in before side seams sewn; that's the way I always set sleeves in, now. Then the underarm sleeve seam and side seam are sewn in one. It works every time on every garment with sleeves. HTH.


-- Edited on 1/19/14 2:56 PM --

Debbie Lancaster
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Date: 1/19/14 4:01 PM

A zigzag stitch or a three-step zigzag on the edge will work. Or Seams Great (seam binding). Or folding under and stitching. Or stitching a straight line about 1/4 inch in and then pinking the edge. I usually just zigzag them together. You can also trim the underarm before doing this if it binds. I don't because I have really skinny arms.

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UNITED KINGDOM
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Date: 1/20/14 1:38 PM

Hi, thanks for the reply.

In my hectic life, I just got back to this, and found a stitch pattern no. 10 on my heavenly Janome. It is the same as serging those raw edges together, so that's what I just did.

Two armhole seams took an entire bobbin's-worth of thread.

MartiP
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Date: 1/20/14 3:15 PM

Also I usually trim the seam narrower in the underarm ares, the widen it around the cap.

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beauturbo
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Date: 1/20/14 5:21 PM

If I want to do that finishing by hand there and not using a sewing machine or overlocker in any way at all, then I machine sew the sleeves into the arm hole, press the seam, not open but fabric edges together, trim it down a bit, then turn both raw edges under in the seam allowance so the folds of them, then meet each other, and then just even hand slip stitch them closed to each other. So at that point it would be about like a french seam in just the looks of it. You do have to ease it in a bit, when doing that final sewing by hand that way, as an armhole is cut on a curve. But that is one more way to get a nice finished looking inside seam there. If you hate hand sewing then that is probably not the way to go, if you like it, I think that would take maybe less than 5-7 minutes of hand slip stitching on each armhole seam allowances to do that though.

Doing something like that, would probably give you a much softer fold and feel to the turned under raw edges of the seam allowances in the arm hole curve, if you were trying to turn them under like that, just since hand sewing uses only one thread and is a lot softer and more controlable finish than a sewing machine using top and bottom threads right there.

Or another way to do it, with no machine stitching showing at all, would be to sew your armhole seams, then trim them down, apply some pretty narrow, self made bias binding over that by machine sewing one edge to it, right sides together, then trimming and flipping and notching, and then just flip and roll that over your raw edge tucking the raw edge of the bias binding under, and hand slip stitching that down, you would see no machine stitches in that either.

Both those kinds of things though, are more suitable, if your arm hole is set in, more in the round, and not more kind of flat construction though.


-- Edited on 1/20/14 5:26 PM --
-- Edited on 1/20/14 5:35 PM --

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