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Eyelets...
DanielleM
DanielleM
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International AUSTRALIA
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Date: 4/5/14 10:09 PM

Hello everyone,

I have to put eyelets on the fronts of a velvet and satin corset; I've never done eyelets before and I've practiced how to actually attach them to the fabric but what's the best way to cut the holes - since it says to do that first? After all that work I really *don't* want to wreck it.

Thanks. :)

dfsews

dfsews  Friend of PR
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Date: 4/6/14 0:27 AM

Are you applying metal eyelets or making sewn ones? I would use a good stabilizer under any sewn ones.

BrendaR
BrendaR
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Date: 4/6/14 1:10 AM

Practice on a piece of the same thickness velvet before you make any cuts. For metal eyelets: Whatever you do, don't make the cut too big. You might use an awl to just poke a hole instead of cutting. You also might just make a small slit instead of trying to make an "o" shape. Just push the eyelet through the small slit--it will usually go.

HanPanda
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Date: 4/6/14 8:38 AM

I always use an awl and then my tiny thread snippers to trim an edge a bit at a time if the eyelet doesn't fit. My holes end up being shaped like this most of the time: |> I second using interfacing below your eyelets. I always interface and add a strip of boning between the eyelets and the edge of the fabric to stabilize the eyelets when they are undee.the stress of being laced, so you don't get wrinkles and wobbles.

One more Q: are you using eyelets or grommets? Grommets have two parts, a front and back. Sometimes they are sold as eyelets still.

------
2014 resolution: keep track of sewn yardage!! I'm subtracting fabric given away from my yardage in. Yeah!
In: 99.75 yards
Sewn: 77.5 yards

I'll try anything once :)

Please excuse my typos...sometimes it is harder to go back and edit on mobile than it is worth!

tailored
tailored
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In reply to DanielleM <<
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Date: 4/6/14 10:48 AM

I use a hole punch.
Manual hole punches are sometimes included in retail packs of eyelets or grommets - it is a tube os steel with a sharpened end, and you use a hammer and place a piece of wood under the fabric to cut the hole, or you can buy a leather punch with the rotating head that has five or six sizes of holes- you use it like a pair of pliers.

------
http://atailormadeit.blogspot.ca/

PattiAnnJ
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In reply to DanielleM <<
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Date: 4/6/14 11:04 AM

I am not sure metal eyelets would work or even look nice on velvet. Metal eyelets are not tall enough for thick fabrics and some do come in a variety of colors, but I do not know if the color holds up or wears off.

Period pieces were sewn openings; eyelets or small buttonholes.

Make a sample with the same fabrics as the bodice/bustier/vest, including any interfacing that you will be using and test both options.

------
"Improvise, adapt and overcome." - Clint Eastwood/Heartbreak Ridge

DanielleM
DanielleM
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Date: 4/6/14 10:11 PM

Hmmm...
They are grommets then, since they are two pieces, black metal - and they're actually a bit too tall, but the smaller size won't fit the cording i bought for it. And the garment is fully interfaced. But, my new sewing machine does sewn eyelets so I might do a couple tests and see how they turn out. Not sure I could do handsewn ones - I'm sure they're not that difficult but I've never dared do a handsewn buttonhole.

Thanks for your help everyone :)
-- Edited on 4/6/14 10:13 PM --

stirwatersblue
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stirwatersblue
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Date: 4/7/14 3:38 PM

I put grommets/eyelets/lacing holes (by hand or machine) in pretty much everything I make.

Some machine eyelets aren't actually functional LACING eyelets; they're a decorative stitch (like on eyelet fabric). If your machine does functional lacing holes, you'll find this thread really helpful. (Follow the other links, as well--there are some great tips in there!)

For machine eyelets in a corset, you have to plan ahead and sew them BEFORE you insert any of the boning--otherwise you won't be able to manipulate the corset through the harp.

I use an awl to open the hole in the fabric/s, but it's a process made more challenging by the number/weight of the fabrics you're using. You want to use an awl that gets quite wide at the base, as the holes will want to collapse. True corset fabrics are very sturdy and require a lot of effort to shove the threads aside. The theory is that you can move them aside without breaking; in my experience, a couple will always break/fray as you're doing it, and it's easy to stretch/distort the fabric a little, too.

Insert the awl and wiggle it through until the hole is the desired size. Place the male eyelet on the tip of the awl and draw the awl back through the fabric, using it as a guide to fit the eyelet section into the hole.

For handsewn eyelets, buttonhole stitch is usually the gold standard, but I just whipstitch mine. It's faster and can look a little neater (less of a learning curve). After stitching, you'll need to use your awl to open up the hole again.

A compromise between metal eyelets and handsewn is to use the metal eyelets/grommets... but then whipstitch them with matching thread afterward. This is a commmon "cheat" in historical/theatrical costuming.

Good luck! Make sure you practice first. Even though I've set hundreds of eyelets/grommets, I still test them EVERY TIME, because fabric behaves differently... and because I can never, EVER remember whether the male or female piece goes on the right side...

------
~Gem in the prairie

DanielleM
DanielleM
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International AUSTRALIA
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Date: 11/10/14 7:11 PM

Well, I finally plucked up the courage last weekend to put the eyelets in; I did use an awl rather than snipping through the velvet and satin, so thanks for that tipIt worked reasonably well with a little thread pulling but that was minimal. Overall I'm really happy with it.

Thanks again everyone!

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