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What have you learned that improved your sewing dramatically?
Things that aren't necessarily in the sewing books ...
marymary86
marymary86
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Georgia USA
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Date: 6/6/14 5:19 PM

I learned to match stitching lines (which sometimes means you don't line up the edges of the fabric).

For example when sewing a shoulder seam, I take care to match the stitching lines. This means the corners don't always line up perfectly. I forgot about that until I basted a Jalie T shirt together this afternoon. The pattern has been beautifully drafted so that the entire corners match up making the stitching lines match up. (Jalie 2005 in case you are curious.)

I noticed a big improvement in my sewing after I started doing that.

How about you?

------
Mary


zynx1234
zynx1234
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Date: 6/6/14 5:26 PM

I have learned to not be afraid and actually sew. I always made excuses for myself like "I am not good enough for expensive fabric, pattern or complicated designs" but I will never be good enough unless I JUST DO IT. So I JUSt DO IT. And I am a better sewer for taking on the challenges.

beauturbo
beauturbo
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Date: 6/6/14 5:41 PM

To know what fabrics would go and work with what kind of shape and style of garments ahead of time. Lots less waders that way. I took me about 5 or 6 years a long time ago to do that though!

To try on all major clothing styles for real, on my real body first, in the stores, in a real dressing room in front of a mirror to see what they are going to look like and feel on my body, and then only buy sewing patterns for close styled ones I know I even like that way first on me.

To look at the Pattern Envelope front Photo of a model in it, or a lovely hand drawn fashion illustration of an artist's style rendering of it, and then afterwards, kind of just wipe that memory out of my mind, and look at and consider only more the technical black and white simple line drawing of it instead.

So even though those 3 are not actual sewing things at all, as not cutting or sewing then even yet, those 3 things and all choices made in even those first, actually are more important to me each and every time, if I'm going to like what I have sewn in the end and be thrilled in wearing what I have sewn, in the finished garment, more than really any particular sewing skill or maybe even the time put into it most times.

Kwaaked
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Date: 6/6/14 6:07 PM

I can't sew a garment any worse then RTW. My seams at least aren't popping and really wonky.

Rest is gravy.

PattyE
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PattyE  Friend of PR
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In reply to marymary86 <<
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Date: 6/6/14 6:09 PM

I learned this a looong time ago...like decades ago...
I am, by nature, a very patient person. So I don't know why I would always try to rush through to get to the finished result. I would skip staystitching, not iron seams properly, 'don't need interfacing there', 'no need to measure that hem', etc. etc. Just so anxious to have my new garment, I suppose. And I didn't realize that my rushing really showed.
Once I started following my natural instincts and taking my time, and just really enjoying myself on every step, however small that was, my sewing really started looking like something I could be proud of. And I felt so much better about it.
So now I've been a slow-poke sewist for many years but it works for me and I wouldn't change a thing....other than hemming. If I had a magic hemming wand I would be happy as a clam.

minggiddylooloo
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minggiddylooloo  Friend of PR
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Date: 6/6/14 6:12 PM

A couple of years ago I learned the process of nesting seams from piecing quilts. It was one of those simple techniques that turned the light bulb on. I now use that technique when constructing garments to make sure intersecting seams are perfectly matched.

Learning how to properly use a French curve also helped me when it comes to pattern drafting.

------
I'm finally a blogger!
sewming.blogspot.com

CrisB
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Date: 6/6/14 6:52 PM

"Press as you sew."

Annette Wright
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Annette Wright
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Date: 6/6/14 7:07 PM

I like detail work, and it was pounded into my brain by my mother. I might not have liked it when I was young, but the skills I learned then, for instance a lovely handstitched hem or even a hand sewn zipper are still with me.

I have learned so much about fitting from Peggy Sagers webcasts and her attitude towards sewing is one I find exciting and makes me eager to sew and try something new.

Just the fact that the information is out there, online, to me is so amazing. I can look up anything and find the answer. Just today I was looking at belt loops for ideas, and I have a new plan for my next pair of slacks.

------
Annette
http://needlesnails.blogspot.com/

ccris
ccris
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In reply to marymary86 <<
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Date: 6/6/14 7:18 PM

Quote: marymary86
I learned to match stitching lines (which sometimes means you don't line up the edges of the fabric).
For example when sewing a shoulder seam, I take care to match the stitching lines.

Exactly, how do you do it? Do you trace the stitching lines, and then use the tip of a pin to poke through from one shoulder line to the other.....or..... I've always been curious about how others do that.

GlButterfly

GlButterfly
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Date: 6/6/14 7:45 PM

I match the edges of the seam, back to front, at the neckline; then do the same at the armhole. You need to ignore the seam allowances. So, where is the seamline? You either need to mark it, measure it, or eyeball it.

------
That's Gl = for Gloria, not G. I.

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