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Adding a cowl to an existing top?
need advice please
sewpelican
sewpelican  Friend of PR
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Date: 6/9/14 9:23 PM

I have carefully removed a ribbed turtle ski neck from a RTW 100% cotton top . The rib piece is 22" long (grain line) x 15.5" wide lying flat, not stretched.
As the high neckline on the garment is undisturbed, I left stitched seam intact, I can lower it slightly.
My real issue is how do I cut a cowl from my ribbing so it looks as if it is the intended design originally?
Has anyone done something similar?
I have S3470 but that cowl is not for ribbing and the neckline is a lot lower. I would have to adjust the cowl
pattern piece to raise its neckline.
Any thoughts or other ideas, perhaps I should have left it alone. If I do re-attatch it I will shorten the length as there is too much bulk as originally designed.
Thanks in advance..Joan

------
Joan
Sunshine Coast QLD

Catina
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In reply to sewpelican <<


Date: 6/9/14 9:52 PM

Is it possible to snap a picture of it and maybe a reference picture of what you would like to the cowl to possible end up looking like? There a many different depths and shape variations for cowls.

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Your "Pattern Hack Fairy",
Catina Ferraine

www.FashionHackPatterns.com

Elona
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Date: 6/9/14 10:53 PM

The problem with cowls is that they mimic the shoulder slope and contour. This means that they have to be a wide-based triangle, narrow at the neck and wider as they spread out over the shoulders.

I do not think you will have enough fabric in your turtle neck to accomplish this, but here are approaches to drafting a cowl.

wendyrb
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In reply to sewpelican <<
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Date: 6/10/14 1:35 AM

I think you're asking how to use the ribbed turtle neck that you removed to create a cowl instead. I agree with Elona that you are unlikely to have enough fabric. A neckline for a turtle neck sits close to the base of the neck, similar to a jewel neckline. A cowl that is sewn on (not an extension of the bodice) takes more fabric than the turtle style. The cowl neckline is scooped out lower, so the neckline circumference is longer than your original. The turtle neck is most likely a rectangle and the cowl needs more of a flare to allow for some drape.

To get a better idea of shaping a cowl pattern and the neckline, I suggest you look at the Sewaholic Renfrew Top and also Kwk Sew 3740. Both patterns have been reviewed here many times and reading those could help too.

------
Always keep your words soft and sweet, just in case you have to eat them. Andy Rooney

Pfonzie- my honey Pfaff Creative Performance, Bernina 930 and 830, Evolution serger.

Nancy K
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Date: 6/10/14 8:28 AM

I just drafted a back cowl following directions in a recent Threads magazine. You can do it from a turtleneck but the instructions are for a jewel neck, using the shoulder point as one point of reference. The front is cut and spread making the shoulders move out with the area in between forming the cowl. It's not hard but there are other ways and styles for cowls.

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www.nancyksews.blogspot.com

Elona
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Date: 6/10/14 12:53 PM

Here is a tutorial for adding a sewn-on cowl, which is probably more like what you envision (rather than a draped self-cowl).

As you can see, one of the first things you have to do is scoop the neckline a little for a cowl, in order to let things drape a bit. Otherwise, you've just got a tall scrunched turtleneck.

Next, you need quite a length of fabric for a cowl; the seamstress here made a tube 24" long to produce a double thickness cowl that is 12" tall finished. In terms of length, you would have enough for a reasonable little cowl collar.

However, to get the right draped effect, the collar has to be pretty wide, too: about twice the length of the measured neckline seam all around. The seamstress in the tutorial chose to make her cowl collar 26" around. It appears that your ribbing is only 15.5" wide, which is just too narrow.

You might be to make it work by cutting your 15.5" turtleneck in half lengthwise and then seaming the short edges together to make a single-thickness, raw-edged tube to produce a cowl about 7" tall.

That's a lot of work, though.

wendyrb
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Date: 6/10/14 1:25 PM

If you want to take a total detour? Use a contrast knit for your cowl. And if you're game for more work than that- you can use the contrast to make a cuff for your sleeves. Now since you're rolling along, make a contrast hip band too! Aren't cha glad you asked?

------
Always keep your words soft and sweet, just in case you have to eat them. Andy Rooney

Pfonzie- my honey Pfaff Creative Performance, Bernina 930 and 830, Evolution serger.

sewpelican
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Date: 7/15/14 4:15 PM

I am sorry it's been so long since I asked this question and then had a long delay in responding. Family matters cropped up which needed immediate attention, then we embarked on a major home renovation project ( not yet completed) and my sewing room shut down.
However now I can turn my attention to this project. Firstly a Big Thank you for your varied and helpful suggestions.

------
Joan
Sunshine Coast QLD

sewpelican
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In reply to Catina <<


Date: 7/15/14 4:19 PM

Sadly I am not tech savvy yet to post photos, hence no reviews from me thus far. But I have looked at many pictures of cowls since your response, thanks for your last sentence.

------
Joan
Sunshine Coast QLD

sewpelican
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In reply to Elona <<


Date: 7/15/14 4:22 PM

I had thought I would have to cut my original ribbing in half to be able to use it. Then I would have a raw, ravelly edge to deal with, and I don't really want a lettuce edge.

------
Joan
Sunshine Coast QLD

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