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What form of knee patching is least likely to re-rip?!
Theresse
Theresse
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Subject: What form of knee patching boys' jeans is least likely to re-rip?! Date: 7/15/14 2:07 AM

Hello,

I youtubed a year or two ago and found several videos showing how to patch rips in denim knees by method of trimming neatly if necessary, pinning matching fabric underneath hole, and free-motion darning using sturdy enough thread and in my case, a darning foot which I bought for that purpose. I might have followed more specific directions at the time that I'm forgetting now - something I think about choosing a patching fabric that's a bit tougher than the denim of the jeans or maybe it's the opposite...can't remember now.

At any rate, both times I did this, it worked beautifully in terms of aesthetics, and sure seemed to come out tough, but both times my sons re-ripped them the first time they wore them! Did I overdo it - make it so tough that the heavier bulk of it all made it rip?

Any tips for patching holes in the knees of jeans that is more likely to hold, than not?!

Thanks so much!
-- Edited on Today at 2:11 AM --

JeanM

JeanM
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In reply to Theresse <<


Date: 7/15/14 8:11 AM

I make my younger son's pants, and at this point I add a pre-emptive patch! I cut a rectangle about 9 inches by the width of the front pants leg, and attach it to the inside of the front leg. I try to place the patch so the center is over his knee when his leg is bent.

For older son's purchased pants, many years ago, I made the largest patch I could stitch in place, stitched around the edge of the patch and then around the edges of the hole a couple of times, spaced apart about a quarter inch, just to hold the edges of the hole in place. This was because I found that the fabric around holes was usually fairly worn, thus not as sturdy as fabric farther away, so a larger patch attached to sturdier fabric was more likely to stay put. It is a more visible fix, even applied from the inside, but seemed to last longer.

PattyE
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Date: 7/15/14 8:32 AM

Don't people pay hundreds of dollars for that look?!
When my boys were little I used to do the preemptive patching too.
I fixed a hole in my son's shirt recently by using fusible knit interfacing. It does not have as much stress on it as pant knees do but it is holding up.

a7yrstitch
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a7yrstitch  Friend of PR
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In reply to Theresse <<


Date: 7/15/14 10:24 AM

I was a also a preemptive patcher. Our youngest liked to play with his cars on the concrete sidewalk. Hard on the little bitty wranglers and boot tips. I opened both side seams around the knee area of new jeans and fused the patch all the way across the inside of the leg front and re stitched the side seams to include the edges of the long patch.

Read somewhere that the fabric threads/fibers are weaker, on their own, when they are stretched out and separated from the other threads/fibers (knees and elbows) and stronger when aligned in their original woven pattern to work as a 'team' with the other threads/fibers. Made sense and preventing the stretching by patching the new jeans worked.

------
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Al Johnson
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Al Johnson
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Date: 7/15/14 11:53 AM

There is a rather complex method that is approved by the FAA and the military for patching parachutes that would probably do the job for you. But rather than trying to post that procedure, I'd suggest the seam-to-seam patching method suggested above.

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A sewing machine is just a welder for textiles.

Mufffet
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Date: 7/15/14 1:55 PM

My plan is thus:

1. Patch once when needed

2. When that goes, cut and make shorts.

Seems to be pretty much a universal for all ages and people seem to like it. My kids, and then their kids, and myself and DH included.

;)

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lauraborealis
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Date: 7/15/14 2:14 PM

In my experience, you have to extend the patch WAY past where the fibers are weakened and darn out there. Otherwise, the weak fibers can't withstand the weight of the patch/darning thread.

Brine
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Date: 7/15/14 10:07 PM

When my three boys were at that age, their pants got knee rips often as soon as the first time they were worn. I would cut a patch quite a bit larger than the actual tear and place it on the outside of the pants and baste it on before stitching around the perimeter of the patch. I then went over the perimeter stitching with a serpentine stitch and also used the serpentine stitch to secure the edges of the rip to the patch. Between using this easy, but inelegant fix. . . and setting aside one "good" (i.e. untorn) pair of pants for when they needed to be presentable, I was able to get through this stage with a certain amount of equanimity. Just for the record, they no longer rip the knees of their pants.

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Brine

JeanM

JeanM
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In reply to Brine <<


Date: 7/15/14 10:25 PM

There seems to be a 'stage' when all pants are in danger of rips at the knee...length of the stage is different for each boy but all go through it. Younger son is 10 and a half...still in that stage, sigh.

sings2high
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Date: 7/15/14 10:30 PM

Yes, darning is much stronger than the weakened fabric around the hole. take the patch way bigger than the hole and stitch around the patch and around the hole.
Pre-emptive strike - I just used the iron-on patches on the inside of my son's school uniforms at the knee - 4 inches wide by 7 or 8 inches long. They sometimes peeled off later, but it was usually quite a while before they did.

Now he prefers his jeans "air-conditioned", LOL. No more patching...except my own jeans, which gets me laughed at quite heartily by my dear parents who well remember the air-conditioned jeans I wore to high-school in my day!

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