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Marking/transferring pattern symbols to fabric with thread (Tip/Technique)
Viewed 5520 times
Review rated Helpful by 5 people   Very Helpful by 8 people   
Posted by: kkkkaty
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About kkkkaty starstarstar
UT USA
Member since: 12/7/05
Reviews written: 127
Sewing skills:Intermediate
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tips added: 18
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Posted on: 12/31/09 6:19 PM
I have only done this once, but it worked really well for both marking symbols and for telling right side from wrong side. When you have the pattern cut out, but before you move anything, take a needle and thread, and run the needle (thread knotted) through the symbol on the pattern and both layers of fabric (then cut the thread on the needle side; I would leave longish tails when you cut the thread). Carefully lift the pattern and fabric together, and do the same in reverse from the other side where the first needle exited. When you have done all the symbols from both sides, gently remove the pattern (a small hole will be left in the pattern) and then separate the fabric layers. The cut tails of the thread will be on the inside once you pull everything apart; the inside is the right side, usually) Now you can tie or loosely knot the thread if you like, although it worked fine for me to leave it unknotted on the wrong side. You'll have thread marking each symbol, and the longer cut tails will be on the right side of the fabric.
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12 Comments      Login to Add a Comment
Winifred said...
Isn't that the same as tailor's tacks ?
12/31/09 6:51 PM
kkkkaty said...
I don't know :) I have never done a tailors tack, and when I read about this it wasn't described using that term..... and if it is, perhaps someone will benefit from reading about it, anyway, eh?
12/31/09 7:42 PM
Rebecca Szetela said...
This is an interesting variation of a tailor's tack. Tailor tack uses no knot. I like the idea of the knot to signify right side since this can be an issue, especially for some knits (including fleece) so it saves the time and effort of marking the inside with tailor chalk. Thanks for the suggestion!
1/1/10 7:57 AM
Fran G said...
any variation of a method that makes life easier...A Good Thing!! Thanks!
1/1/10 8:55 AM
Fran G said...
any variation of a method that makes life easier...A Good Thing!! Thanks!
1/1/10 8:56 AM
Elaine Dougan said...
Very helpful variation of the tailor's tack.
1/1/10 10:12 AM
Princess Aurora said...
I agree with Winifred, it does sound like Tailor's Tacks. Either way, it is a very helpful suggestion. Thanks!
1/2/10 1:07 PM
kkkkaty said...
funny, I have now read up on "Tailor's Marks", since this question was raised, and the instructions don't really make sense to me. I think what they do have in common is using a needle and thread to transfer a mark (on one side ata time? is that correct?), but otherwise they seem pretty different....
1/3/10 12:24 PM
ryansmumAria said...
This is by far the most efficient technique although time consuming initially but in the long run effective.
1/3/10 10:26 PM
Fictionfan said...
kkkkaty, you are describing a slimmed-down version of a tailor's tack. See: http://sewing.about.com/library/sewnews/library/aamarking0404a.htm There is a diagram showing the way to do tailor's tacks. Sounds like you figured out how to do them without being shown!
1/9/10 3:46 PM
Jwilson said...
This does basically what tailor's tacks do except that I don't have to turn the fabric. I use EMBROIDERY FLOSS (two threads) to give some grip to the threads. When you pull the fabric apart, the loops remain on the wrong side of the fabric and you cut the threads between the fabric layers which leaves the tails on the right side. The worst part of this is the tearing of the pattern when you remove it from the fabric, so I cut out the paper where the marks are.
1/11/10 8:34 PM
Jwilson said...
This does basically what tailor's tacks do except that I don't have to turn the fabric. I use EMBROIDERY FLOSS (two threads) to give some grip to the threads. When you pull the fabric apart, the loops remain on the wrong side of the fabric and you cut the threads between the fabric layers which leaves the tails on the right side. The worst part of this is the tearing of the pattern when you remove it from the fabric, so I cut out the paper where the marks are.
1/11/10 8:35 PM

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