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Forum > Sewing Machines > I want to sew fast, but not industrial ( Moderated by Sharon1952, EleanorSews)

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I want to sew fast, but not industrial
Susan obsessive sewing
Susan obsessive sewing
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Date: 3/24/12 10:28 PM

I want to sew fast, do you think I should have a brother 1500,Bl type, or try to treadle?

I like to make garments and home dec, curtains, roman blinds, cushions etc. I want to add to the fold, I have a Singer 201, love it, but not fast enough, if I got a Pfaff 130 with a 1.3 amp motor is that fast enough?
I have never tried treadling, can I go really fast on one of those?

I have my slow machine herd, how about a 100 metre athletic one?

Al Johnson
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Al Johnson
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Date: 3/25/12 0:18 AM

I'd suggest you find a way to try an industrial. After a little adjustment, you will most likely never want to go back to home sewing machine speed.

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A sewing machine is just a welder for textiles.

karen149
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karen149  Friend of PR
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Date: 3/25/12 0:40 AM

The great thing about today's industrial machines is having the option of a servo motor. I tried one the other day...I could sew at any speed I wanted and it was so quiet. I am in love and am trying to justifying having one now!

SouthernStitch
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In reply to Susan obsessive sewing <<


Date: 3/25/12 0:41 AM

I had a Pfaff 130 with a larger motor like that. It did go faster, and is a very powerful machine, but was too heavy for me since I didn't want to leave it set up.
You could try one of those Juki industrials that have the easy maintenance servo motor. They don't seem to take up too much room, either. But, still mighty heavy to transport if you have to have some more serious maintenance done. It's good to have a tech who makes house calls!

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Jennifer Hill
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Jennifer Hill
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Date: 3/25/12 0:49 AM

I'm surprised you find your 201 slow. Maybe you would be VERY happy with an industrial....

Treadles are very nice to use for stitch control and noise reduction. But they aren't usually noted for their speed. The fastest I've kicked mine up to is 700-800 spm, but that was with an industrial base and a high speed industrial machine.

I'm not sure what other machines you have been using, but I'm generally appalled at the wussy top speeds of many modern home machines, and I find their motor noise rather annoying. I have another industrial, and equipped with a servo motor, it affords excellent stitch control plus a top speed of 2200spm. With experience, most folks find standard clutch motors on indies quite satisfactory, especially at the top end of their speed range.

Jennifer in Calgary

jadamo00
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Date: 3/25/12 8:22 AM

Wow, I grew up around industrial machines and I must say, I have always really loved sewing slower at home! Maybe my trips to the factory as a kid impressed me as utter workworkwork, and home sewing seems more for easy enjoyment.

j.











-- Edited on 3/25/12 4:55 PM --

Yarndiva
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Date: 3/25/12 11:58 AM

I use a Juki DDL 8500 at work and find it fast but also can be slow enough for most work. Slowing it down takes a bit of practice at first. It is industrial though. At home my fastest and smoothest runner is a 1950 Pfaff 131.

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Susan obsessive sewing
Susan obsessive sewing
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In reply to Jennifer Hill <<
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Date: 3/25/12 1:31 PM

Hi Jennifer,
Glad you replied to this one, as I was really wondering if i could step it up with a treadle, and you are saying, they don,t go too fast, even after years of treadling?

What is a servo motor? I used industrial machine when I worked in a prison(industrial clothing workshop) and they where speeding up to about 5000 spm, . I have also tried a bernina 950, and I found that slipped alot.

Learn To Sew
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In reply to Susan obsessive sewing <<


Date: 3/25/12 5:13 PM

Just how fast do you want to sew?

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Jennifer Hill
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Jennifer Hill
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In reply to Susan obsessive sewing <<


Date: 3/25/12 5:21 PM

What is a servo motor..... I started by looking up the technical specs of these, but it gets all very confusing very fast if you aren't familiar with the inner workings of electric motors, which I'm not. If anyone reading this has a better understanding or explanation of these beasts, please correct me.

For years, the standard way of powering industrial machines has been with clutches. In the bad old days before electricity, factory machines were connected to spinning line shafts via clutches. These shafts could be powered by steam, water, or primitive electrical engines. As the shafts always turned at constant speeds, maximum power was always available to each machine, regardless of the actual speed at which the operator sewed. In the early 20th century, it became simpler to equip each machine with its own motor, but the connection was still via a clutch. Because these motors are always ON, just like the spinning line shafts, they are a very efficient way to achieve max power and speed.

In recent times, more folks have been using industrial machines in non-factory installations, especially in home uses. Some find the noise of a constantly running clutch motor annoying (or their downstairs neighbours do), and engaging the clutch for slow careful stitching requires a very delicate touch on the pedal that needs much practice to perfect. Enter the Servo - a DC motor that provides the power and speed folks expect of industrial machines, yet has the action and control similar to that of home-use machines. While still more expensive than clutch motors, their prices have dropped enough that they are attractive alternatives for those unhappy with clutch motor operation. They are still big heavy units which attach to the sewing table, and belt the machine.

In my case, I have a Singer 20U zig zag indie. I was getting pretty good at controlling the clutch when straight stitching, but with zz, I couldn't control the initial acceleration enough to prevent jerky starts and many broken top threads.

Jennifer in Calgary

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