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Thread tracing
How to trace both pieces
sewlily
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sewlily
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Iowa USA
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Date: 12/5/05 1:27 PM

Is there some trick to tracing through a double layer of cloth or do you thread trace each item separately (i.e., each sleeve separately, etc.)

Mary Stiefer
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Mary Stiefer  Friend of PR
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In reply to sewlily


Date: 12/5/05 1:53 PM

I'm not sure I know what you mean when you say "thread trace" . Are you using basting stitches for marking notches and dot?? Could you explain a bit more?

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What is Maxine saying??
"I don't iron. If I'm not wrinkle-free why should my clothes be."

sewlily
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sewlily
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Date: 12/5/05 2:33 PM

Claire Shaeffer and Susan Kaljie talk about "thread tracing" the seam lines from the pattern onto the fabric and then cutting out large seam allowances (maybe 2"). When you pin, you match the seam lines and not the fabric edges. It is claimed that this results in a more accurate construction.

I have a Marfy pattern that I am going to attempt to make over the holiday. I made the muslin and am awaiting my fashion fabric. As I was contemplating the thread tracing, I thought how tedious it would be to trace out each pattern piece twice (there are no "on the fold" pieces except for the collar). I just wondered if there was some trick to the thread tracing - some shortcut.

I hope I am explaining this correctly.

gabrielle

gabrielle
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In reply to sewlily


Date: 12/5/05 2:34 PM

You know, I think thread-tracing (where you run a stitch all around the pattern outline as well as internal pattern markings) is probably best done on single layers of fabric. The best technique I've seen is to cut out full pattern pieces, remove any seam allowances, then run a basting stitch along the seam lines and on any internal markings, including notches, darts, grain-lines, and center front and center back. With this method you can cut your seam allowances as wide as you like, since your stitching line is marked. Great for fitting and precision sewing.

I would only use thread markings on a double-layer if I was going to do what I would call "tailor's tacks," which is using thread to mark darts and other internal marks. For tailor's tacks I thread a needle with four strands of thread, then run the needle through and back once. If I carefully separate the layers I can clip between, leaving a good-sized knot of thread visible on each piece of fabric. I sure hope that makes sense...probably lots of other ways of going about it, too. :)

GoSewGirl
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In reply to sewlily


Date: 12/5/05 9:45 PM

Thread tracings are done on a single layer, to mark all stitching lines, grain lines and notches, etc for each piece in the garment. Once you've basted the pieces together for stitching, you can remove the thread tracings along the seam line you're about to stitch - its easier to remove it before stitching over it!

HTH

Oh, and the "stitch" is usually 1 very long stitch (about 1" or more, depending on the detail needed) with 3 or 4 small (about 1/8" or 1/4") running stitches in between the longer ones.

It helps your accuracy a lot, but it IS extremely tedious!

-- Edited on 12/5/05 10:48 PM --
-- Edited on 12/5/05 10:49 PM --
-- Edited on 12/5/05 10:51 PM --

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Liz

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utz
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Date: 12/6/05 7:13 AM

May I encourage you to thread trace stitching lines. Once I began doing this my fitting techniques greatly improved and now I can't imagine not thread tracing. (You can see stitch line on both sides!)

You can pin edges together from the outside (fold over one edge at stitch line and match it on other seam line and put pins perpendicular to stitch line.) You may find that you need just a little more or less and pin to correct. Then correct stitch line with new thread trace there. After using thread tracing I found to my astonishment that sometimes it is just a matter of a 1/4' (or less) difference and the garment hangs right without draw line wrinkles.

Many patterns have a very subtle curve that a thread trace will show, but you can't possibly keep track of it you were to just 'move over 5/8' . (E.g. Burda WOF subtle curves make for its great fit.)

I think thread tracing saves time in the long run because it allows for accuracy and last minute changes that greatly improves the look of a garment. To take a little tedium out of the tediousness I purchase silk thread (red) to thread trace. It's beautiful to handle, and if you sew over it when seaming it pulls out fairly readily (sometimes with a tweezer.) I use a long needle, I sit at a table and listen to good music. (Roberta Carr recommended long stitch, short, long stitch short to prevent any gathering.) With practice it goes rather quickly.

Also, once you start thread tracing it opens other techniques where thread tracing is a godsend - matching plaids at seamline, tailoring technques etc.

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'Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.' Oscar Wilde

GorgeousFabrics
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GorgeousFabrics
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Date: 12/6/05 7:31 AM

I'll add my voice to the chorus of thread tracing fans. It really does help increase your accuracy. When I am making somthing that I want to be of very haute level sewing, I always cut the pieces from a single layer and thread trace the seams. This may add time in the beginning, but the results are SO worth it, and it actually ends up saving time and aggravation during the sewing process. One side benefit of using a single-layer layout on your fabric is that you usually use far less than the pattern calls for. I think with Marfy patterns you'll find you have more control if you use single layer layout.

HTH!
Ann

kmouse
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kmouse
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In reply to GorgeousFabrics


Date: 12/6/05 7:56 AM

This is new to me. I suppose this has to be done by hand, especially on some fabrics to prevent distortion of machine basting? Is the type of thread important? While I don't have anything on the "haute" level, I do have some projects in mind to try this.

GorgeousFabrics
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GorgeousFabrics
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In reply to kmouse


Date: 12/6/05 8:04 AM

I don't have any real preference on threads, though if I am making something from a very fussy fabric (certain silks or very tightly woven materials) I will use a fine guage silk thread. Other than that, I use a thread in a color that I can spot easily against my fabric.

Ann

GoSewGirl
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In reply to kmouse


Date: 12/6/05 3:31 PM

To add a tip to the thread question, like Ann, I'm not necessarily so picky about what type of thread, unless it's on a very fine fabric. I do like to use a contrasting color though, and again, another different color for basting thread. It just makes it easier to remove later on.

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Liz

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