SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Forum > Pattern Modifications, Design Changes & Pattern Drafting > Does anybody use a sloper for fitting?

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
Does anybody use a sloper for fitting?
I'm not sure how to do it
OP Gal
starstarstar
OP Gal  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Kansas USA
Member since 10/14/03
Posts: 2561
Send Message

      



Date: 8/26/06 8:15 PM

I made a sloper several years ago when I started sewing again, but never could really figure out how to use it. I hate to admit how stupid I am about this.I'd lay a sloper piece against a pattern piece and then wonder what it all meant. Can anyone explain how to use a sloper or point me to a book or article that explains how to use a sloper?All I can find is information on how to make a sloper.

------
If I sewed any slower, I wouldn't be sewing at all. -- Kellie R.

CSchiffgens

CSchiffgens
Intermediate
Texas USA
Member since 4/19/04
Posts: 48
Send Message

      



Date: 8/26/06 9:21 PM

There's an article on the Threads magazine web site that has some instructions on how to compare your sloper to a fashion pattern. I think it was written by Karen Howland.
You could also compare your personal sloper to a basic fitting pattern from the pattern companies and see what the differences are. McCalls, Butterick and Vogue all have them. You would need to take in account the small amount of ease on the fitting patterns.
I do use my sloper to fit patterns from companies that I'm not familar with.

OP Gal
starstarstar
OP Gal  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Kansas USA
Member since 10/14/03
Posts: 2561
Send Message

      



In reply to CSchiffgens


Date: 8/26/06 10:05 PM

Thanks. I'm still confounded. I've read this article and one or two others that tell you to cut apart your sloper and compare it with the garment pattern. The Threads article tells you to reshape the sloper in relation to the pattern until you feel the garment has the right ease in the right places. What baffles me is: 1) Does this mean that you're supposed to cut apart your sloper again and again each time you use it? 2) How does making your sloper fit the pattern tell you how well the pattern will fit your body? Your sloper no longer resembles your body at this point, right? I seem to be missing something here. I'm so confused.

------
If I sewed any slower, I wouldn't be sewing at all. -- Kellie R.

rhoda bicycle

rhoda bicycle
Intermediate
Saskatchewan CANADA
Member since 6/26/05
Posts: 1148
Send Message

      



In reply to OP Gal
thumbsup 1 member likes this.


Date: 8/26/06 10:18 PM

Quote: OP Gal
...What baffles me is: 1) Does this mean that you're supposed to cut apart your sloper again and again each time you use it? 2) How does making your sloper fit the pattern tell you how well the pattern will fit your body? Your sloper no longer resembles your body at this point, right?...

I think the idea of the article was, you made a tracing of your sloper, rather than cutting the original sloper apart. Then, by cutting it and making it resemble the pattern, you could clearly see how the pattern was different and how you had to alter it to make it closer to your sloper. For example, if your sloper bodice tracing has to be cut and spread 1" to come to the same length as the pattern bodice, then that means you have to shorten the pattern bodice by 1" to bring it in line with the sloper. So, you're basically doing the opposite to the pattern that you had to do to the sloper to make it resemble the pattern... if that makes any sense... It does sound a bit bass ackwards, but perhaps it makes more sense once you start doing it.
BeckyW
star
BeckyW
Intermediate
Alabama USA
Member since 5/23/04
Posts: 491
Send Message

      



In reply to OP Gal


Date: 8/26/06 10:35 PM

I share your confusion. I will be checking this thread to see what others post. If you find some great revelation somewhere, please post and share the knowledge. I really do not understand the difference between the terms "sloper" and "fitting shell". I thought they were the same thing. I am curious, how did you make your sloper? I am just getting into all this. I bought the 5 video set from Peggy Sagers on pattern making, muslin fitting, etc. It is very interesting, but I still have questions. I also bought the fitting shells from McCall's in both an 8 and a 10 and after three tries, I think I just about have a good fitting shell. I plan to hit the library Monday and see if I can pick up "Fit for real people" and see if that sheds any light on the matter. I ended up finding that the size 8 fit best in the shoulders and upper chest. The 10 gaped there. I also found that I had to drop the bust points down a good bit and also add some length below the bust as well. I am very long in the torso. I am also thicker in the middle and had to add a good bit along the side-seams. I ended up retracing a paper pattern each time from the original incorporating my changes. I think for my first stab I am going to plan on cutting a size 8 and use the fitting shell to make sure that I have enough room in the width of the waist. I know how much length I had to add to the shell and where I had to add it. I think I could pretty much just add these same lengths to the pattern. Maybe, use my fitting shell pattern to double check.

------
Becky

OP Gal
starstarstar
OP Gal  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Kansas USA
Member since 10/14/03
Posts: 2561
Send Message

      



In reply to rhoda bicycle


Date: 8/26/06 10:42 PM

Oh, now I get it. Duh! Yes, it does make sense. Thanks for explaining it so clearly.

------
If I sewed any slower, I wouldn't be sewing at all. -- Kellie R.

OP Gal
starstarstar
OP Gal  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Kansas USA
Member since 10/14/03
Posts: 2561
Send Message

      



In reply to BeckyW


Date: 8/26/06 10:49 PM

I'm operating on the assumption that a sloper and fitting shell are essentially the same thing. I think the term sloper is an industry term that professional pattern makers use to describe the base on which they design garments. I think a fitting shell is what the home sewing pattern makers call their patterns that some of us call slopers. I made a sloper several years ago when I took up sewing again after a long absence, and before I learned more about fitting. Since reading FFRP and learning about the famous FBA, I'll need to make another sloper. But, I wanted to finally learn how to use the darn thing before I made another one.

------
If I sewed any slower, I wouldn't be sewing at all. -- Kellie R.

BeckyW
star
BeckyW
Intermediate
Alabama USA
Member since 5/23/04
Posts: 491
Send Message

      



In reply to OP Gal


Date: 8/27/06 9:04 AM

I have never needed any FBA adjustment. Before kids, I needed the complete opposite. The McCall's pattern I am using (M2718) is the fitting shell made by Palmer/Pletsch and comes with several cup sizes (A, B, C & D) already drafted. This might give you a head start. I bought mine on a $1.99 sale at JoAnn's. My Hancock's does not stock them and makes you special order them.

------
Becky

Elona
star
Elona  Friend of PR
Advanced
Member since 8/24/02
Posts: 8626
Send Message

      
thumbsup 1 member likes this.



Date: 8/27/06 11:55 AM

I don't cut up my fitting shells. I use them to check for shoulder length, back width, width at the bust (sometimes, because this depends a lot on the style), armhole depth, waist length, and sleeve length (I pin the sleeve at the shoulder mark and then measure the distance from center back neck, down shoulder and shoulder to wrist).

For me, it's just a rough guide, but it does indicate if the shoulders and back are going to be too large or small, and those are some of my most important fitting issues.

Sew'n'go
star
Sew'n'go
Intermediate
Nova Scotia CANADA
Member since 3/5/04
Posts: 368
Send Message

      



Date: 8/27/06 2:51 PM

I think fitting shells help you figure out a) which size fits you best (or is the best one to start from), and b) what modifications you will need to routinely make to the pattern so the finished garment will fit.

Eg - Full Bust adjustment - Many women find that patterns bought to fit their full bust measurement are too big in the shoulder/neck area. They purposely pick a smaller pattern size that fits better in the shoulder/neck area and expand the bust area (and the waist, in my case) to accommodate their fuller busts. This enables them to know they how much they should add to most patterns to get the design ease allotted by the designer/patternmaker.

It's an interesting exercise to do if you are frustrated with the way your finished garments are fitting (or not fitting) you.

FFRP is an *excellent* book for explaining how to determine which areas need adjustment, along with detailed instructions of how to do the adjustments. For me, it was time well spent.

Tory

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Pattern Modifications, Design Changes & Pattern Drafting >> Does anybody use a sloper for fitting?

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Altering Jackets
Altering Jackets

Register

Understanding Wool Fabrics
Understanding Wool Fabrics

Register

McCall's 6697

photo
by: norsk

Review
Sew Liberated Mei Tai Baby Carrier

Sew Liberated Mei Tai Baby Carrier

Buy Now
Sewn Square One Triple Play Top Pattern

Sewn Square One Triple Play Top Pattern

Buy Now

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.