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Forum > Sewing Techniques and Tips > Flat Fell Foot ( Moderated by MissCelie)

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Flat Fell Foot
Does anyone know how to use it?
Vicky C

Vicky C  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Arizona USA
Member since 2/5/05
Posts: 156
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Date: 10/6/08 1:10 PM

After reading here on PR about a flat fell foot from Shoppers Rule, I decided to buy one. I make boxers for my dd to wear around the house and I thought the foot might make them easier.

The foot included a very tiny, folded up piece of paper with instructions but the pictures and the text are totally unreadable.

Does anyone know how to use this foot?

As a PS, I won't buy from Shoppers Rule again. The postage on this foot was listed on the outside of the package. It was $1.34. They charged me almost $7.00!!! Outrageous.

-- Edited on 10/6/08 1:10 PM --

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Vicky

loohoo44
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loohoo44
Intermediate
California USA
Member since 2/25/07
Posts: 171
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In reply to Vicky C


Date: 10/6/08 1:38 PM

here is a link to a helpful pdf file.

http://www.sewingmachinesplus.com/media/products/techniques/by-foot/felling-foot-techniques.pdf

Ody
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Ody  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Missouri USA
Member since 12/6/03
Posts: 2549
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In reply to loohoo44
thumbsup 1 member likes this.


Date: 10/6/08 4:12 PM

I can get that foot all day long for that price. I have not seen it anywhere for the $19.99 they advertise. I looked up your profile and it says you have a Viking? You are using a thumbscrew to put your feet on? That foot also looks like an industrial foot, which I use all the time on both of my machines.

I do fake flat fell on most of my kids and dh's clothes. I trim, serge one side, press over, and then top stitch twice on top with my compensating foot. It always looks very professional.

------
"Sewing should be fun; make it that way!" Margaret Islander
Flying through life by the seat of my pants and hoping I get my crotch curve right.
"No humiliation is too great for a well fitting pair of pants!" Heidi Cooper
J6500P,
J1600P
J3160DC
J350E
JCP1000
Pfaff C1100 Pro
Babylock Eclipse serger
My grandmother's Feather Weight

Emi1yKate
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Emi1yKate
Intermediate
Member since 1/18/03
Posts: 356
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Date: 10/6/08 6:35 PM

Ody, do you turn under the edge at all or is the two lines of topstitching on the side that the serging is not? Cos I have just realised, if so, what you're describing would end up looking exactly the same as any ACTUALLY flat-felled seam, from the right side of the garment! And be far less bulky...

I have been doing flat-fell seams on denim- making jeans a lot lately- and I have been thinking about getting a foot like this one to make it easier. I have been pressing the seam allowances over first, then using just my normal straight-stick over top. If I could cut out this step I'd be saving a lot of time- and burned fingers!

-- Edited on 10/6/08 6:39 PM --

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www.thisisemilykate.blogspot.com

petro
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petro  Friend of PR
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France
Member since 6/24/07
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Date: 10/7/08 3:57 AM

I fake flat fell exactly as Ody describes. Lots of jean material is too stiff and bulky to handle proper runandfell on my domestic, and Ody's method is quicker, avoids that bulky lump where seams cross. From the outside it looks pretty much identical to a true flat fell and the inside is neat and indestructible enough.

Emi1yKate
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Emi1yKate
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Member since 1/18/03
Posts: 356
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Date: 10/7/08 5:32 AM

Well that settles it, the bulky lump where the seams cross at the crotch has just about been my undoing when making jeans, and if its not going to actually LOOK any different than proper flatfelling, I'm gonna do it petro & Ody- style!

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www.thisisemilykate.blogspot.com

Ody
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Ody  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Missouri USA
Member since 12/6/03
Posts: 2549
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In reply to Emi1yKate


Date: 10/7/08 11:01 AM

I sew my seam, serge the side that will be on the outside (wrong side of the garment if that is confusing), trim down the side of the seam allowance that will be underneath, press well to one side, and then turn my garment inside out and top stitch. I sew the outside seam first normally so I can do this whole procedure flat, and then do the inseam on pants. For me it is easier to TS in the well and go down the inseam of the leg.

When I am top stitching, I first do one line right next to the seam--about 1/16 or so from the edge. Then I go back and sew another line 1/4" from the edge, which gives a very professional look and also reduces bulk. The trimmed edge is encased under the sergered piece of seam allowance, and it is all held down with the top stitching. I don't think you lose any strength in the seam with this method, which is one of the things flat felling is meant to do. Believe me when I tell you I have an 11 yo ds who can test the limits of any garment and any seam known to man!

I used to just use my regular foot to do the spacing, but I have seen Ron Collins on a Sandra Betzina DVD use some of the clip on feet with rudders and spacers to sew great topstitching.

I just started using the compensating feet and wow! My top stitching is perfect now. I would imagine that on a lot of high shank machines these feet could screw on, and I don't know if they make them for low shank, but that is a possibililty. I have commercial screw ons for my J6500P, which is low shank and I love them, but I have not looked for compensating feet for it since I usually only top stitch on my J1600P, since it does such a fabulous job.

I just think that top stitching is a very important thing to master, and is one of the first things you can do to make your garments look professional. I use this method bc it also reduces the bulk without losing strength.

I would put a picture on, but right now my computer is picture challenged. I am waiting for my dh to fix this problem so I can even post reviews!
-- Edited on 10/7/08 11:02 AM --

------
"Sewing should be fun; make it that way!" Margaret Islander
Flying through life by the seat of my pants and hoping I get my crotch curve right.
"No humiliation is too great for a well fitting pair of pants!" Heidi Cooper
J6500P,
J1600P
J3160DC
J350E
JCP1000
Pfaff C1100 Pro
Babylock Eclipse serger
My grandmother's Feather Weight

Tessa
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Tessa
Intermediate
Manitoba CANADA
Member since 8/24/02
Posts: 947
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Date: 10/7/08 2:35 PM

I also do fake flat fell on my husband's pants, but I just serge the two seam allowances together, trimming them to about 3/8 inch, then press to one side. I then edgestitch and topstitch from the right side. One of the reasons for doing a true flat fell seam is to encase the seam allowances so they won't fray, but with a serger to finish the seam, that really isn't necessary, and the two extra rows of stitching make the seams almost indestructible.

Edited to add: Ody, could you explain what compensating feet are? I just use a jeans foot for topstitching pants, and a straight stitch quarter inch foot for shirts. What am I missing?
-- Edited on 10/7/08 2:38 PM --

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Tessa

Ody
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Ody  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Missouri USA
Member since 12/6/03
Posts: 2549
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In reply to Tessa


Date: 10/7/08 3:40 PM

There is a plethora of industrial feet out there bc there used to be a huge garment industry here in the US until it was shipped over seas. All the sewers had to own their own feet for their straight stitch machines and many of them are little known to the home sewing community today.

I personally use a lot of these feet, even on my J6500P which has a zigzag. Most of these feet really do the job extremely well, but are for specific purposes, such as welting feet I have for my 6500.

The compensating foot at the Juki website is a quick search for me to show you. There are two on the page so scroll down and you can see what they are like. The part of the foot on the right (These are "right feet" and they come in left as well for the straight stitchers) goes along the edge of the seam, or fabric. It will move up and down on a hinge so that if you TS over an adjoining perpendicular seam, it will just move the foot smoothly over that area without any hesitation. I have the 1/16" and the 1/4" fight feet at this time that do the best TS I have ever had---my TS with these feet look like a double needle did them. Going around collars and such it is just perfect.

You have to screw these feet on and I am not sure if the compensating feet are available for short shank machines. I just called my dealer and he said he would look it up and get back to me.

Otherwise you can use some of the clip on feet such at the 1/4" foot, others to get around the challenge. I will say this, that the industrial type home machines such as the Janome 1600P series, or the Juki home types are much easier to TS on than regular home machines unless they are some of the older all metal vintage machines. They have more power and pressure on the fabric than regular machines have. My other machine is a Janome 6500P, which I love, but even it will not do the TS that my J1600 will do.
Here is the link to the Juki foot site.
Here is another.
And the best up close picture I can find.
You will notice on this last picture that on the right part of the foot there is a groove that the fabric can go in as it moves along. This last one is a long shank, but one of the previous pictures looks like it might be a short shank. Notice also in this last picture down below, they have a thumb screw available for a whopping $.75! Everyone who has a machine that wants to use screw on feet should have one of these. They make is a lot easier to get the feet on and off.

Hope this has been some help. Gee, I have had my J1600 for three years and I did not know about this type foot until recently. Who knew? There is a guy on Ebay that sells these feet in sets that are cheap. They should not ever cost more than $12 max so they are not expensive!

------
"Sewing should be fun; make it that way!" Margaret Islander
Flying through life by the seat of my pants and hoping I get my crotch curve right.
"No humiliation is too great for a well fitting pair of pants!" Heidi Cooper
J6500P,
J1600P
J3160DC
J350E
JCP1000
Pfaff C1100 Pro
Babylock Eclipse serger
My grandmother's Feather Weight

Vicky C

Vicky C  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Arizona USA
Member since 2/5/05
Posts: 156
Send Message

      



In reply to Ody


Date: 10/7/08 4:50 PM

Yes I do have a Viking -- the flat fell foot came in a snap on style which is what I use. It was only $10.99.

Hmmmm, I'm going to think about mock flat felled seams even though I just bought the foot....

------
Vicky

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