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Forum > Knitting Lounge > after scarves, what did you knit at the next level? ( Moderated by JEF)

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after scarves, what did you knit at the next level?
progressing from beginner level
bzar
bzar
Advanced Beginner
Hawaii USA
Member since 9/30/05
Posts: 126
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Date: 1/16/09 5:32 PM

just curious - what was your first project after going thru the beginner stage of skill? how many beginner projects did you do before doing something more advanced?

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~jeannine

Therisa
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Therisa
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Michigan USA
Member since 4/1/07
Posts: 936
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In reply to bzar


Date: 1/16/09 5:47 PM

I always tell people to choose what they want to make next, and make it. Socks, hat, sweater, gloves - the more you like what you're knitting, the more quickly you will learn the needed skills to make it.

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Fabric Purchased in 2011: 37 yards
Fabric Sewn in 2011: 0 yards
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Aleah

Aleah
Beginner
California USA
Member since 1/9/05
Posts: 186
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Date: 1/16/09 6:49 PM

Baby sweaters. They teach the same skills as making larger sweaters, only the financial investment is much smaller and the satisfaction is greater (in terms of how much time it takes to finish one). I've been using Baby Knits for Beginners by Debbie Bliss. I'm on my second sweater from that book.

MissCelie
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MissCelie  Friend of PR
Maryland USA
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Date: 1/16/09 7:00 PM

Gosh. I think I'm going to try little socks/booties next and all I've ever made are scarves. Although my current scarf is the only one that I've followed a pattern for.

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Cidell
www.missceliespants.com

KiwiWendy
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KiwiWendy
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International AUSTRALIA
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Date: 1/16/09 10:04 PM

I agree with whatever you want to knit. After a single garter knit scarf, my next project was a pair of 4-ply fingerless gloves with a cable in the rib. The very next was a 6 colour fairisle vest. I'm a very slow knitter, and thankfully have even tension.

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Sydney, Australia



Member since 12/31/69
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Date: 1/17/09 8:28 AM

I never started on scarves. The first thing I knit was a baby sweater for my son. Then I made him another one. Now I don't hardly knit at all, lol.

pfaffkj

pfaffkj
Intermediate
Tennessee USA
Member since 7/28/05
Posts: 461
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In reply to bzar


Date: 1/17/09 9:00 AM

Knit whatever calls to you! If you are really interested in the project, you will be able to meet the challenges it offers. For me, knitting something just 'cause it is easy and simple gets boring fast and usually leads to an UFO! Now, if it is an interesting yarn, a new technique, or something I need or want -- that makes a good project for me.

Does your knitting shop offer classes or maybe one-on-one help for their customers? This might provide you with a 'safety net' to make you feel more confident. It is always nice to know there is help available, even if you find you don't need it.

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Karen

Yards in stash: I don't want to know!
2013 yards sewn: 1
2013 yards bought: 5


emelle
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emelle
Alabama USA
Member since 11/22/07
Posts: 506
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In reply to bzar


Date: 1/17/09 9:24 AM

It's been so many years ago, I do not remember....the answer is so individual. As my daughter worked and taught in a very nice yarn shop here, I saw that there were beginners and other beginners....some had good results right off the bat and others took longer to aquire even tension, the ability to pick up dropped stitches and fix mistakes, etc. Some students were happy to leave the scarves and go to sweaters, hats and socks....others wanted to do scarves with cables for example and others wanted to do simple garter stitch blankets/shawls, but make them special by knitting every other row or so in coordinating yarn/ribbons.

So, it depends I think on doing something you want to do and one's patience level, facility with knitting and ability to brush off a less than perfect result and press on to other projects with an idea that you learned something. The yarn you choose for the project should also reflect your ability to deal with success and learning techniques.....Always use good materials...but there is great yarn at reasonable prices at my LYS as well as very expensive silks, specialty yarns etc.

It's like sewing, I would not suggest someone go from a first "simple" garmet or tote bag project sewn with a nice woven immediately to an advanced Vogue designer pattern sewn with gorgeous, expensive, difficult to work with designer fabric. (Unless you don't mind sacrificing your money to a learning experience), just mo. Either use more challenging, specialty yarns for a simple project and technique you have mastered, or reasonably priced, still quality yarns for a new technique.

Diana M
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Diana M
Intermediate
Washington USA
Member since 4/19/04
Posts: 927
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Date: 1/17/09 11:26 AM

I've been teaching a friend to knit -- she started with dish cloths and made about 3 dozen of them for Christmas presents. She was nervous about binding off, so she just kept buying more needles, knitting 2 to a needle, etc. She did get them done, though, and has a beautifully even knit stitch after all that garter stitch! Since she's afraid to try to purl, she's moved on now to hats, knit in the round, still all knit stitches.

She's fine with it, she's made a half dozen and has learned circular needles, double pointed needles, decreasing, changing colors. Now she says she's maybe ready to learn to purl, after she gets a few more hats done.

Each at their own pace -- I think I moved slippers to afghans, and ponchos for my (then) pre-school daughters. They're 37 now.
-- Edited on 1/17/09 11:27 AM --

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Sewing fills my life. And my living room, and bedroom, and closets, and car . . .
-----------------------------------
The advantage of a food allergy is that I get to choose the restaurant.

jaeng
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jaeng
Intermediate
New Jersey USA
Member since 3/8/06
Posts: 487
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Date: 1/18/09 1:32 PM

I did a few scarfs, hats and a kid's sweater, then vests ( knit in the round) and I braved enough to knit shrug, sweaters and cardigan from top down using designer's patterns. Now I can make up my own pattern (simple one) and can adjust
existed patterns such as change size, yarn, needle and convert seamed pattern to seamless.

I think if you have strong basic, it will pay off in the future.

p.s. I have never done socks and gloves, they look very hard.

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