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Forum > Miscellaneous > Does Your Laundry Room/Area Get Really Dusty? ( Moderated by Deepika, EleanorSews, CynthiaSue)

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Does Your Laundry Room/Area Get Really Dusty?
going crazy keeping the "dust" down
Mrs.Moos
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Mrs.Moos  Friend of PR
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California USA
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Date: 2/1/09 1:09 AM

My laundry room is an area that is a pass through to the garage. I can close it off but idf you want to go to the garage (and the "beverage refrigerator") through the house, you have to go through the laundry room. I have always had a hard time keeping the dust down in this room. It seems to be the type of stuff that is in the lint filter of the dryer. That filter on my dryer is located on the top of the dryer. I clean ithe religiously with each load and wash it often so it doesn't become clogged. But I still have dust. I have checked the vent hose that connects to the wall--it is secure and no holes. So I assume it is coming from when i clean the filter. I have started keeping a dust buster on top of the dyer and I suck up any dust that lands on the dryer top and even stick the dustbuster down as far as possible into the opening that the lint filter goes in and clean that out. But I still seem to have a lot of dust in there. I see photos of laundry rooms that have sewing areas in them and shudder since all I can think of is how dusty it would get.
Does everyone have this problem? If so, what do you do about it?
I am getting my new washer on Tuesday and was going to try and paint the walls in the laundry room after the old one is taken out BEFORE the Superbowl!
But I think I may have to VACUUM the walls first!
I have tried keeping the vent area cleaned out. I have discovered that if you take the vent hose off the vent, get your leaf blower and take the curved end off that, the rest of the end of the leaf blower fists nicely in the vent hole going to the outside. Wrap a towel around the connection and let the leaf blower rip! The first time i did it, there was stuff everywhere outside and I think my neighbor was POed. So now I only try to do the leaf blower cleaning when it is raining so it takes the stuff out if the air.
It would seem that this would keep the vent line cleaned out. So why is there so much dust in my laundry room? What to do?

Yvonski
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Yvonski  Friend of PR
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NEW ZEALAND
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In reply to Mrs.Moos


Date: 2/1/09 1:55 AM

Just the laundry room. My whole house is a dust bowl. Especially in the dry season. If I don't shut the windows when the lawns are being mowed the windowsills are black with dust. I think dust is just another 4 letter word.

And in the winter out woodburner seems to pour out dust! Can't win.

------
Life is too short to stuff mushrooms

Doris W. in TN
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Doris W. in TN  Friend of PR
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Tennessee USA
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In reply to Mrs.Moos


Date: 2/1/09 5:23 AM

I have the same problem, and my laundry room is a separate room. It comes from the lint filter on the dryer. This is why I always blanch when I see a house that has its 'sewing station' in the laundry room. Ugh. My sewing room is linty enough and requires constant dusting and vacuuming.

I have a water-misting bottle, and before I remove the lint I mist it first with water. It helps keep the floaties under control, but not total control. I still have to wipe down the top of the dryer often. One-half of a used dryer fabric softener sheet will wipe it up nicely. I don't use them often, but will in winter when static electricity is worse.

I think lint in general is worse in winter. One of my allergies references (I have awful allergies) says that dust mites go dormant in winter, when the humidity is really low in hour homes, ::: but ::: that lint is worse because the fibers are so dry they break off more easily. So if you think it's worse in winter, it probably is.

teagg
teagg
AUSTRALIA
Member since 5/25/05
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Date: 2/1/09 5:55 AM

I'll add - me too... in fact our whole house is dusty - much more so than when we were in England... admittedly the house is larger, has hard wooden floors, the windows are draughtier, we have RC/AC (reverse cycle air conditioning) - so whether heating or cooling, the air gets blown around.

I have heard that air ionisers are supposed to be good at enabling the dust to settle v. fly around; alternatively we've just bought a dehumidifier that has an 'air purifier' option... but I'm more interested in dehumidifying my linen closet and my bedroom+wardrobe, than my laundry... so I just do the same sort of thing - use the hand held vacuum cleaner.

I don't think this really helps you (sorry!) but it does let you know that you aren't alone in your laundry delights!!
regards
Gillian

PS you are asking some really interesting questions in the lead up to your new washing machine arriving - I've been enjoying reading them... and learning from them!! thanks!!

------
G
Sydney, Australia

Miss Fairchild
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Miss Fairchild
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In reply to Mrs.Moos


Date: 2/1/09 10:24 AM

Maybe I can offer a little advice. After coming to possibly burning down my house with my dryer this last holiday season, I've learned a good lesson.

From your post, it sounds like you have the same problem I had, although my laundry room is in a small bathroom. I had lint everywhere; in more places you could imagine. I thought this was normal for such a small area. DH would clean the vent once a year, and vacuum behind the dryer.

When my dryer started squeaking, and finally quit, with a burning smell, I called the repair [person] and he discovered something very dangerous. The vent that attaches from the dryer to the dryer vent (inside the dryer so you don't see it), had come loose ever so little, and put lint all over inside the dryer box, where the drum sits. There was so much lint on the motor, which went kaput because it couldn't operate, that if you were to look at it, you would think it was in packing material. Over 1 inch thick!

The only way I could have known this is if I were to have pulled out the drum every year and check behind it. That would have triggered something. The repair person said that apparently the dryer had been bumped, which made the inside vent move. So he bolted the inside vent to the dryer, and where the vent tubing came to the outside, he bolted that too. And we are going to pull the drum out every year to check--just in case.

Maybe you might want to do this, just to see how much accumulation is built up inside your dryer box.

------
"Play the cards you are dealt, but choose who is sitting at the table"..AARP magazine

SEE MY ETSY SHOP HERE: http://www.etsy.com/shop/AuntMaymesAttic
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Stitchology

Stitchology
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Maryland USA
Member since 1/26/03
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Date: 2/1/09 11:26 AM

I use a long brush made especially for cleaning around the cavity where the filter sits, as the filter only catches a portion of the lint. I also use the small scale vacuum attachments that I have for my SM on the inside of the dryer lint opening.

Since I'm cheap and environmentally conscious I only dry my clothes briefly to soften them and get out the wrinkles, then hang dry. Since I'm opening the dryer so often I clean the filter each time before it can build up a heavy coat of lint.

------
Buy the best and you only cry once.

Michelle T

Michelle T
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British Columbia CANADA
Member since 8/24/02
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In reply to Mrs.Moos


Date: 2/1/09 11:38 AM

In my previous home the laundry room and sewing room were the same. There was no big dust/lint problem. The dryer had a lint trap that I accessed when I opened the door.

My current house has a separate laundry room and the dryer has the same lint trap set up. It is in the frame of the machine and I access it when I open the door.

There is more dust in general in this laundry room, but that is more because the outside basement door is there, you have to go through the laundry room to get from the stairs to any other room downstairs and we have more pets who lead to more dust bunnies etc.

My sewing room is next door to the laundry room.

I wonder if your machine is leaking out the lint and dust from within the machine?

------
Proud parent of a Dwight International School Honour Roll Student

tourist
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tourist  Friend of PR
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British Columbia CANADA
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Date: 2/1/09 1:24 PM

I think the seal around my lint trap is getting old and leaks. I notice that when I have something on top of the dryer (a blanket waiting for the wash maybe) I don't have as much lint flying around. I don't dust in general because nobody ever sees my laundry room. But I do run the vacuum around every now and then.

The dryer I use at work gets the build up problem, but there is someone who opens it up and clears out the build up regularly, thank goodness.

------
http://bgballroom.wordpress.com to follow the progress on my next ballgown.

JTink
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JTink
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In reply to Mrs.Moos


Date: 2/1/09 2:35 PM

I actually have more dust/lint in my sewing room than I do in my laundry room. I don't think this will help your lint problem, but one thing that folks forget to clean in their dryer is the lint filter. I don't mean just scoop out the lint at every load and vacuum the vent once in a while. I mean take the lint basket out of the vent and wash it. Scrub it with hot water and a stiff brush. My brother sent me an e-mail about this a few years ago. I took mine out and just to test it, I filled the basket with water before cleaning it. The water wouldn't even go through the screen! I found out that dryer sheets put out a film that eventully covers the screen in the filters. This keeps the clothes from drying as quickly as they could.

QuickFade
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QuickFade
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Date: 2/1/09 3:00 PM

Having a clean dryer vent can save energy dollars, reduce the risk of fire, and make the clothes dry faster.

Thanks for the reminder!

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