SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Forum > Sewing Techniques and Tips > Crocheted fabric ( Moderated by MissCelie)

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
Crocheted fabric
Creating/sewing crocheted fabric
Mandolin82
star
Mandolin82  Friend of PR
Intermediate
WA USA
Member since 5/8/03
Posts: 1345
Send Message

      



Date: 7/6/04 7:22 PM

I recently saw a sweater similar to this , made from a delicate cotton/linen yarn.  Unlike most crocheted clothing articles it looked very fashionable.

Since I can crochet I'd like to create something similar.  I don't want to find a crochet pattern for a sweater.  What I'd like to do is create some crocheted fabric and then use it to sew a sweater/cardigan.  By crocheting the fabric I could:

1)have a more mindless crocheting experience, rather than having to worry about increasing/decreasing/etc.
2) use a pattern that already fits me, rather than having try to figure out how to adjust a crochet pattern.

Has anyone here ever done anything like that?  How did you handle the edges when you cut it out.  Any other ideas/techniques you would recommend?

I'm currently thinking I could draw the pattern outline plus seam allowance on the crocheted fabric and then use my serger to "cut" the pattern out.  This would seal the seams so they wouldn't unravel.  Or maybe I could use a washaway stabilizer until I have it sewn together.

I'd appreciate any thoughts people might have on this.  I'm actually pretty excited about the possibility of crocheting something I'd like to wear.

Susan

Stitchology

Stitchology
Intermediate
MD USA
Member since 1/26/03
Posts: 3678
Send Message

      



Date: 7/7/04 9:37 AM

I understand what you mean about paying attention to the shaping details while crocheting. But, unless you are dealing with very thin thread and a very dense stitch pattern, I think it will be difficult to make sure the cut edges are bound well enough to keep individual threads from escaping the machine stitching and ravelling. The seams might be lumpier than if you had the edges created by just the crochet stitches.

How about a sweater constructed of just rectangles without the sleeve and armhole shapings? Not as form fitting, but more likely to hold together.

------
Buy the best and you only cry once.

Neefer
starstarstar
Neefer
Intermediate
CA USA
Member since 4/8/02
Posts: 2662
Send Message

      



Date: 7/7/04 11:48 AM

Why not just crochet the fabric into the shape of flat pattern pieces from a sweater pattern.  I'd use something that was appropriate for a raschel knit or sweater knit.  Then you could sew it together.

There are lots of lovely  lacey-type crochet stitches.  I've found that it takes a very, very long time to make a sweater, tho.

------
Neefer aka AgitProp and Village Churl Sewing Blog: http://www.oaktrees.org/blog/

Bonny lass, bonny lass, will you be mine?
You shall neither wash dishes nor serve the wine;
But sit on a cushion and sew a fine seam,
And feast upon strawberries, sugar, and cream.

Nikki
starstarstarstar
Nikki  Friend of PR
Advanced
MD USA
Member since 4/8/02
Posts: 2600
Send Message

      



Date: 7/7/04 5:49 PM

_Sewing with Knits_ by Connie Long has a section on dealing with openwork knits.

"Some openwork knits have very open areas or gaps along the seamline. In that case, use bias tricot such as Seams Great in a color that blends with the fashion fabric to connect the gaps so that you can sew and stabilize the seams. To do this, pin the seam with right sides together, then position the bias tricot so that it is centered over the seamline and it curls away from the fabric. Using a narrow or medium zigzag, sew the seam together with the tricot facing up, then finger-press the tricot towards the seam allowances. Sew or serge the second stitching next to teh first, catching the tricot and cutting away the excess eam. Just a bit of tricot will remain in the actual seam.

Shoulder seams should be reinforced twice because they are more susceptible to strain than other seams. Using a stabilizer such as bias tricot or a strip of fusible tricot interfacing, sew the shoulder seam using a double-stitched seam combination, then topstitch teh shoulder seam to one side using a zigzag stitch or a straight stitch."

Seams Great is available in more colors than just white, black, and tan - I've seen it in two widths and a whole range of colors (red, purple, etc). The colors and wide varieties can be hard to track down, tho - I've only seen them at G-Street.

------
mmmmm woooool

Mandolin82
star
Mandolin82  Friend of PR
Intermediate
WA USA
Member since 5/8/03
Posts: 1345
Send Message

      



Date: 7/7/04 8:08 PM

Thanks for the reference to the Sewing with Knits book - I even have it and didn't think of looking in it.  I'm hoping I can make this work, I'll have to try it out on a small sample with some cheaper yarn.

Stitchology

Stitchology
Intermediate
MD USA
Member since 1/26/03
Posts: 3678
Send Message

      



Date: 7/8/04 9:43 AM

Cheaper yarn would probably yield worse results and discourage you from doing the project that might work with the more expensive stuff. Invest in one ball and you can always use it for trim or something if you decide against the project.

------
Buy the best and you only cry once.

maybbm
star
maybbm  Friend of PR
Advanced
MA USA
Member since 7/31/02
Posts: 16
Send Message

      



Date: 7/9/04 11:28 AM

Here are some thoughts occurred to me.  

How are you going to determine the amount of yarn for the cardigan?   My answer would be actually to get hold of a similar crochet pattern and get some ideas on the amount.   This information will be helpful even if you are going to crochet a piece of fabric, rather then crochet sleeves and bodies.  Colors of yarns vary depending on the dye lot and usually it is a good idea to purchase all the yarns you need with the same dye lot.  For that, you need to know how much you are going to use.    

Looks like you need rather thin yarns, fingering or lace weight.  Some of those yarns come in cones at good discount prices rather than in balls or skeins.  WEBS or Halcyon Yarns sell those not necessarily for knitting/crocheting but for weaving.  When purchasing on internet, I recommend visiting a local store and see the actual yarns you are interested in or order a ball as a sample first.  

Another possibility in figureing out how much yarn to purchase is to do a swatch of say 6" by 6" making sure you measure the length of yarns you are using.

Good luck!

Mandolin82
star
Mandolin82  Friend of PR
Intermediate
WA USA
Member since 5/8/03
Posts: 1345
Send Message

      



Date: 7/11/04 8:48 PM

Thanks everybody, for the thoughts.  I'll post again once I've tried it.  It might be awhile, we're moving and things are pretty hectic right now.

Susan

jlg
starstarstarstar
jlg  Friend of PR
Intermediate
Member since 3/5/03
Posts: 146
Send Message

      



Date: 7/15/04 9:13 PM

Susan, I was looking through Sewing with Sergers The Complete Handbook for Overlock Sewing (Palmer/Pletsch Serger Publication) and Chapter 13 is about serging sweaters.  It doesn't have a lot on it, but suggests either knitting or crocheting your own sweater yardage and then tracing out the pattern and stitching inside the cutting line to hold the knit together or knitting or crocheting to the shape of a pattern as Neefer suggested.  It gives some hints on serging sweater knits (hand done or not).  Now, you've got me wanting to do this.  I've got a road trip coming up and may crochet myself some yardage.

Mandolin82
star
Mandolin82  Friend of PR
Intermediate
WA USA
Member since 5/8/03
Posts: 1345
Send Message

      



Date: 7/15/04 11:02 PM

JLG,  Thanks,  I'll definitely check this out!

Susan

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Sewing Techniques and Tips >> Crocheted fabric

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Beginners Guide to Dyeing Fabrics
Beginners Guide to Dyeing Fabrics

Register

Put it on the Bias
Put it on the Bias

Register

Contest Mini Wardrobe Contest

photo
by: nicegirl

Review
PatternCompany.de 01-611

photo
by: SewRuth

Review
Beginner Sewing Lab 104 - A downloadable Book by Shannon Gifford

Beginner Sewing Lab 104  - A downloadable Book by Shannon Gifford

Buy Now
Shapes Nine Lives Vest Pattern

Shapes Nine Lives Vest Pattern

Buy Now

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.