SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Platinum Sponsor
Fashion Fabrics Club
Fashion Fabrics Club

Forum > Fitting Woes > muslins, how many do you make? How do you make them? ( Moderated by CarolynGM, Deepika)

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
muslins, how many do you make? How do you make them?
tg33

tg33
Beginner
IRELAND
Member since 11/11/08
Posts: 1009
Send Message

      



Date: 7/2/10 4:52 AM

I'm not really sure how to describe this, so I'll dive in!

When you make a muslin, look at it, adjust the pattern, do you then adjust the cloth you have already cut out, or do you cut out another muslin from scratch to check if the changes you made work? I'm (slooooly slooooly) making the short sleeved top from NL6735 and I cut into my fashion fabric straight off. I am happy to put some work into this as I want it to become a tnt pattern, but I am unsure as to how to tweak it in the best way. Still very very much a beginner here

------
Reading from Europe

Tenshi
star
Tenshi
Intermediate
GERMANY
Member since 1/28/10
Posts: 114
Send Message

      



Date: 7/2/10 5:23 AM

I only make muslins for very important projects, like my graduation ball dress. I muslined both the lining and the fashion fabric seperately because the pattern for the mwas different. I did not muslin th skirt part, only the bodice, but that I kinda did twice (re-used all the parts I had not changed, so I only actually changed and recut the upper front bodfice). I also re-used the lining's back muslion for the fashion fabric's back muslin.
Normal clothes are just tweaked and fudged as I go, maybe with a bit of tissue fitting thrown in.

tg33

tg33
Beginner
IRELAND
Member since 11/11/08
Posts: 1009
Send Message

      



Date: 7/2/10 5:47 AM

Tenshi, thanks for the reply! I do not have the experience to 'wing' it, and I am sewing really because I want things that fit and look well, so I feel nervous about just cutting into the fashion fabric and adjusting it!! Mind you, I find once I'm finished it doesn't look as bad as I feared, usually!

------
Reading from Europe

ClaireEmily
starstarstar
ClaireEmily
Intermediate
AUSTRALIA
Member since 9/28/08
Posts: 408
Send Message

      



Date: 7/2/10 6:38 AM

I am by no means an experienced fitter but my method is along the lines of
1) try on the tissue ( tissue fit)
2) make any adjustments
3) try on the tissue again

If it looks pretty good and is a project that is not complicated, in cheaper fabric I just make it up.

If it is something I am unsure about (for me this would be all pants), something time consuming (a coat or jacket), or expensive fabric I'd make a muslin.

If the muslin looks good, cut the fabric. If the muslin looks bad go back to step 1, make differnt adjustments etc. or ditch the pattern. I think making too many adjustments each round is a recipe for failure too.

It gets much easier when you have an idea of what adjustments you will need, so it will be much quicker as you get more experienced.

Good luck!

------
Claire - Melbourne, Australia

JTink
star
JTink
Intermediate
Member since 4/20/08
Posts: 6067
Send Message

      



In reply to ClaireEmily


Date: 7/2/10 7:10 AM

I pretty much do what ClaireEmily does. This is were my cheapy Wal-mart cottons come in handy. Also, Hancock puts their $1.99 broadcloth on sale for $.99. You can use your Joann's and Hancock coupons to buy their cheap muslin. You can use old bedsheets, cotton curtain panels etc. That's the stuff I use for a "dirty muslin". Meaning, it's not going to be worn outside of the house and it's only made to the point where I can adjust what needs adjusting(no buttons or facings). I've pretty much got my bodice down to where I know what adjustments to make. But if I have a pattern with a neck line that looks a bit large or a lot of pleating going on, I'll do a quick muslin. Pant's... Oh yeah...a new muslin everytime I open a new pattern. I'll never get that crotch curve right. I also agree that too many adjustments on the first go around is just depressing and confusing. Take it one step at a time and try not to be to critical of your work. If you take a step back, you will see that your garment, probably looks a lot better than a RTW.

Miss Fairchild
starstarstarstar
Miss Fairchild
Advanced
USA
Member since 8/24/02
Posts: 7936
Send Message

      



In reply to tg33


Date: 7/2/10 7:31 AM

I always make a muslin, although I didn't always before. Shannon Gifford (our belated teacher) taught me this and it has been a godsend. I can't tell you how many times I fouled up fabric by not doing so, only to become even more frustrated because I've wasted good fabric.

I make the adjustments to my pattern first, then cut out a muslin. This is usually in the form of muslin (aka "calico") fabric (sheets are also used) or something from my stash that I bought on impulse and that closely resembles the fabric I eventually want to use. I improve on this muslin and then mark up the muslin with my changes. Sometimes I'll even take a magic marker and mark all darts and seamlines, and then rip the muslin apart and use that as my pattern. This is, of course, if I feel like ripping out seams or if I've used the chainstitch on my machine. Then I mark on this muslin the date I made it and what pattern number it belongs to. I save all my muslins for any pattern I like. This is important to me because if I want to go back a few years later, I try on the muslin and note any more changes I need to make, without having to recut the pattern.

Pattern tissues are too delicate for me to fit; they drive me crazy! I bought the Fit for Real People book and have great difficulty fitting myself as the pattern tissue eventually tears. I'm too cheap to buy Swedish Tracing paper, so I trace my patterns on newsprint--free from the newspaper office.

Good habits start early and it's more difficult to train your brain to go back and do something right, such as make a muslin, if you've not been doing it for a while. It's more time consuming, sure, but in the long run, it's a big payoff. In fact, you wouldn't be able to tell if an item looks good on you if you don't make a muslin first. MTCW

------
"Play the cards you are dealt, but choose who is sitting at the table"..AARP magazine

SEE MY ETSY SHOP HERE: http://www.etsy.com/shop/AuntMaymesAttic
My blog: http://auntmaymesattic.wordpress.com/

tg33

tg33
Beginner
IRELAND
Member since 11/11/08
Posts: 1009
Send Message

      



Date: 7/2/10 7:42 AM

Thanks for all the input. I am currently working on a knit top. I have cheap light jersey, but for some reason used the 'good' fabric instead!

------
Reading from Europe

KathySews
star
KathySews  Friend of PR
Advanced
Michigan USA
Member since 10/1/06
Posts: 3913
Send Message

      



Date: 7/2/10 8:15 AM

I do basically the same thing as ClaireEmily. I do trace my pattern on to something that will not tear and work from there. Right now I am using medium weight interfacing. I purchased a bolt from JoAnn using a coupon.
I still struggle with getting the changes back to the pattern.
My limit is 2 attempts before I lose patience.

EleanorSews
star
EleanorSews  Friend of PR
Advanced
Michigan USA
Member since 7/26/07
Posts: 4459
Board Moderator
Send Message

      



Date: 7/2/10 8:21 AM

I've been doing a lot of muslins ~ more than real garments! But, I am reaching a point where I am happy with some things. At long last.

I like to use a plain solid fabric as a muslin and I sew with the seams on the outside which means if I need to take a seam in, I can pin it from the outside. I write on the muslin and cut it apart and add fabric where needed. When I like the look, I try another muslin. If that is acceptable, the fashion fabric gets cut.

My problem is that whether the fabric cost was a lot or a little, most of the fabric in my stash is stuff I like and would prefer to wear rather than ditch. Doing a muslin allows me the opportunity to consider the intended fabric and adjust design details if need be. It also has changed my mind about what I wanted to use as fabric.

------
"We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are." Anais Nin

"Attitude is the difference between an adventure and an ordeal." unknown

tg33

tg33
Beginner
IRELAND
Member since 11/11/08
Posts: 1009
Send Message

      



In reply to EleanorSews


Date: 7/2/10 8:40 AM

Quote: EleanorSews


My problem is that whether the fabric cost was a lot or a little, most of the fabric in my stash is stuff I like and would prefer to wear rather than ditch. Doing a muslin allows me the opportunity to consider the intended fabric and adjust design details if need be. It also has changed my mind about what I wanted to use as fabric.

Thanks, I think that is the situation I am in too!

------
Reading from Europe

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Fitting Woes >> muslins, how many do you make? How do you make them?

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Expert Sewing Techniques for Jackets
Expert Sewing Techniques for Jackets

Register

Sewing with Slippery & Drapey Fabrics
Sewing with Slippery & Drapey Fabrics

Register

BurdaStyle Magazine 08-2012-113

photo
by: SewingandS...

Review
Mini Miranda Bag

Mini Miranda Bag

Buy Now
Sew Chic Clara Bow Apron Pattern (ln102)

Sew Chic Clara Bow Apron Pattern (ln102)

Buy Now
Jalie 2918

photo
by: Trephas200...

Review

Pattern

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.