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Binding for a Wall Hanging
HannahKatherine
HannahKatherine
Member since 7/13/10
Posts: 6
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Date: 7/13/10 7:45 PM

I have made a wall hanging for my kitchen. I put the binding on and it came out very wavy. I am a self taught quilter, so I know there is a way to do this correctly, but I am at a loss. If anyone has any suggestions I would appreciate it. Should it be a bias binding, straight binding, do you pin the binding or pull it tight?
Thanks so much.....

ukdame
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ukdame
Intermediate
WA USA
Member since 8/1/08
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In reply to HannahKatherine


Date: 7/13/10 7:56 PM



I wish I had a close up of the binding. On larger quilts I usually do mitered corners but on this small one I just cut each side strip seperately and folded under the ends and machine sewed across he ends creating a squared off look. Post a pic when you have it done. Love to see it.

------
It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something. ~ Franklin D Roosevelt 1843
Janome 19606 ,Janome My Excel 4023, Brother 1034D, White 1750C, Kenmore 158.1803, White 764, Brother 780D.

OBX
OBX
Advanced Beginner
NC USA
Member since 4/23/10
Posts: 183
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Date: 7/13/10 10:55 PM

You do not have to use bias binding unless your quilt has curves on the edges. Did you attach all by machine or hand hem? You do not need to pull or stretch the binding as that could distort the sides of your quilt.

I usually start on the side near to a corner. I do the mitered corners and leave plenty of extra when starting and ending for a continuous binding. I cut mine about 2 and 1/2 inches wide and do a folded binding. If you have a quilt magazine or book, they usually cover binding methods. There are lots of great tutorials on the internet. Sharon Schamber has a website and a free video on how she does machine bindings. I hope I spelled her name right, but it should come up if you google it.

Being self-taught is fine. I learn mostly from books and trial and error.

HannahKatherine
HannahKatherine
Member since 7/13/10
Posts: 6
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Date: 7/14/10 7:28 AM

I attached the binding by machine and then hand stitched it to the back. I usually pin it fairly close together before I machine stitch it and then miter the corners. I watched a video on youtube and the woman just held the binding and smoothed it as she sewed. I was wondering if this was better? I have made a few other wall hangings and I think I just got lucky because they lay very flat on my wall. I didn't do anything different this time. I will watch the video you suggested and remove the binding and start over. Wish me Luck....Any more suggestions are always welcome. Thanks !!
-- Edited on 7/14/10 8:49 AM --

HannahKatherine
HannahKatherine
Member since 7/13/10
Posts: 6
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In reply to ukdame


Date: 7/14/10 7:29 AM

Thanks so much for your help! I will have one of my kids help me post a picture of my wall hanging. I am still not so great with the connection between the camera and the computer!

TessKwiltz
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TessKwiltz  Friend of PR
Intermediate
TX USA
Member since 9/21/07
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In reply to HannahKatherine


Date: 7/14/10 10:35 AM

Quote: HannahKatherine
I attached the binding by machine and then hand stitched it to the back.

Did you use a walking foot to do the machine sewing? If not, I would speculate that the binding was stretched during this part of the process.

I never use a bias binding unless doing curves (as OBX stated earlier). I have a friend who insists her bindings always come out wonky unless she uses a bias binding. I can't explain it.

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Tess

On threadpainting flowers: "How many colors are in a flower? ... How many do you have?" - Ellen Anne Eddy

HannahKatherine
HannahKatherine
Member since 7/13/10
Posts: 6
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In reply to TessKwiltz


Date: 7/15/10 9:45 AM

I did use a walking foot. It has worked before, not sure why it didn't this time. I really think sometimes I just get lucky! I watched the video by Sharon Schember and it was great. It looks like more work but I am going to try it. The glue seems a little strange, but I will give it a shot. I also think I will like it better than pins.
Thanks Again.

Doris W. in TN
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Doris W. in TN  Friend of PR
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In reply to HannahKatherine


Date: 7/15/10 2:26 PM

Always use a walking foot, as you did.

Make sure the quilt is "squared up" before you apply binding. Measure thru the center L and W, and then make sure the edges are the same size.

Measure the binding for each 'side' before you pin it, and mark the mid-way point of the quilt edge and binding also. That keeps it all honest and you'll know nothing grows.

I also never use bias binding, except when I splice it to straight-grain binding for a rounded corner on a quilt. I cut my binding on the lengthwise (straight) grain, to ensure it won't stretch or grow during application.

HannahKatherine
HannahKatherine
Member since 7/13/10
Posts: 6
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In reply to Doris W. in TN


Date: 7/15/10 9:44 PM

Ok...Remember that I am self taught and somethings have escaped me...I often would rather just play than read about it. So here is the next question....Please explain "squared up"...I thought it was just making sure the corners were squared. I am not sure I understand how you explained it. So I measure edge to edge to make sure its the same? Also do you only do this with wall hangings or large quilts too?
Thanks for all your help.....

Doris W. in TN
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Doris W. in TN  Friend of PR
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In reply to HannahKatherine


Date: 7/16/10 9:45 AM

Quote: HannahKatherine
Please explain "squared up"...I thought it was just making sure the corners were squared.

You're right in that you want to make sure the corners are square, as they do tend to grow 'dog ears.' Here is a video about that, which you probably already know how to do.

This link tells you how to make sure the entire quilt is square --- perfectly square or darned near close. This is especially how you do something larger than a small wall quilt. (I don't do the diagonal measuring they list.)

After you have measured the length of a quilt, mark the mid-point (half-way point) of that length. Same for the width.

Next, mark your binding for that same length, taking care to not stretch the binding. This is why I prefer length of grain binding---it won't stretch. Mark the mid-point also. Pin one side of the binding, matching up end points and the mid points. Quilts like to grow as we sew binding to them. This cured my problem. After you miter each corner, re-measure and re-mark the mid-point again, and repeat. Doing this will ensure that your quilt won't grow, even with a walking foot, because pinning to the binding keeps it honest.

It may seem like a lot of work and bother, but trust me, after you do it a few times it's not that much more work. Besides, you will be really pleased when your quilt is finished and the borders are not waving at you.
-- Edited on 7/16/10 9:46 AM --
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