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Vintage pattern fabric description
what did it mean in the 70s?
lakaribane
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lakaribane
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Date: 11/24/10 8:05 PM

I'm looking at this 1977 knit dress pattern and it says "unbonded stretchable knit" but I'm not sure what that means: matte jersey or something like ponte (which I've never used/owned)?

Any and all opinions welcomed.

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Morphology: Petite at 1m53 (5'), Burda size altered 19 or altered 38, Big 4 size 10 or 12 depending on ease;
Alterations: Petite, Narrow Shoulders, Slim Arms, Narrow waist, Increase Back Crotch Depth. Considering: Forward Neck/Rounded Upper Back, Slight Swayback;
Style: Feminine, Colorful, Fitted, Clean lines;
Favorite Garment type: Dress;
Favorite Colors: Purple, Navy, Brown, Shocking Pink, Coral, Aqua;
Favorite Fibers, Weaves or Patterns: Cotton, Linen, Cotton Silk blend, Seersucker, Swiss Dot, Lawn, Denim, Stripes, Chevron, Window pane Plaid, Bias;
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goodworks1
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goodworks1  Friend of PR
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Date: 11/24/10 8:24 PM

A lot of jerseys and double-knits were 'bonded' in the 70s. They had a sort of heavy knit interfacing fused to the entire back of the fabric. Sometimes it was even heavier; almost like a layer of foam in between the layers.

So, what the dress pattern means is "...don't use a heavy knit that has almost no stretch and is sort of rigid looking and feeling."

I think almost any current knits would NOT fall into this category.

You might want to skip the knits that look as though they are quilted and have two different layers.

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Batik
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Date: 11/24/10 8:24 PM

I could be wrong, but some of the knits back then were stiff: had a backing that kept them firm or bonded. Stuff wore like iron and you can still see it sometimes in the thrift stores. Any softer knit with the degree of stretch appropriate to your pattern and your preference should do.

lakaribane
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lakaribane
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Date: 11/24/10 8:33 PM

Wow, thank you for the quick replies, Goodworks1 and Batik, LOL, I think you guys clicked post at the same exact time.

------
Morphology: Petite at 1m53 (5'), Burda size altered 19 or altered 38, Big 4 size 10 or 12 depending on ease;
Alterations: Petite, Narrow Shoulders, Slim Arms, Narrow waist, Increase Back Crotch Depth. Considering: Forward Neck/Rounded Upper Back, Slight Swayback;
Style: Feminine, Colorful, Fitted, Clean lines;
Favorite Garment type: Dress;
Favorite Colors: Purple, Navy, Brown, Shocking Pink, Coral, Aqua;
Favorite Fibers, Weaves or Patterns: Cotton, Linen, Cotton Silk blend, Seersucker, Swiss Dot, Lawn, Denim, Stripes, Chevron, Window pane Plaid, Bias;
Blog : http://fashionmate.blogspot.com
Pinterest : http://pinterest.com/lakaribane/

Miss Fairchild
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In reply to lakaribane <<


Date: 11/24/10 9:22 PM

Imagine a t-shirt with a very light interfacing on the back; maybe fusible tricot. That's what is meant by a "bonded stretchable knit". Anything else will work.

------
"Play the cards you are dealt, but choose who is sitting at the table"..AARP magazine

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lakaribane
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lakaribane
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In reply to Miss Fairchild <<


Date: 11/25/10 8:23 AM

It sounds very odd to me. What was it used for, jackets? The rare poly knits I've seen from that era (as we dress in a very westernized way here) were at the end of their life, granted, but I don't think I ever met the bonded knits.

------
Morphology: Petite at 1m53 (5'), Burda size altered 19 or altered 38, Big 4 size 10 or 12 depending on ease;
Alterations: Petite, Narrow Shoulders, Slim Arms, Narrow waist, Increase Back Crotch Depth. Considering: Forward Neck/Rounded Upper Back, Slight Swayback;
Style: Feminine, Colorful, Fitted, Clean lines;
Favorite Garment type: Dress;
Favorite Colors: Purple, Navy, Brown, Shocking Pink, Coral, Aqua;
Favorite Fibers, Weaves or Patterns: Cotton, Linen, Cotton Silk blend, Seersucker, Swiss Dot, Lawn, Denim, Stripes, Chevron, Window pane Plaid, Bias;
Blog : http://fashionmate.blogspot.com
Pinterest : http://pinterest.com/lakaribane/

Sewliz
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In reply to lakaribane <<


Date: 11/25/10 8:40 AM

Bonded knits! What an awful invention those were. It was a knit fused (bonded) to an interfacing like stabilizer. Sometimes the stabilizer was sort of foam like. They used to make bonded wovens as well. There were some advantages, I suppose. The fabric didn't wrinkle, or wasn't supposed to, and you didn't need to wear a slip if the bonding material was smooth.

Today the term bonded knit makes me think of "headliner fabric", something sold at JoAnn in the home dec section, LOL. It's a thin jersey bonded to a layer of 5mm thick foam.

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Liz

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goodworks1
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Date: 11/25/10 12:45 PM

I think the real advantage to 'bonded knits' was that they were extremely inexpensive to make -- the face fabric could be of terrible quality and the bonding would hold it together and make it sturdier.

They tended to be used for things for which you'd use a bottom-weight fabric. They did not drape at all. I think I even had a dressy coat once (in high school) that was a royal blue bonded wool boucle. In this particular case, it was actually warmer than the boucle would have been without the bonding...

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blog: goodworks1.wordpress.com

Lee Ann Hawkins
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Date: 11/26/10 10:50 AM

What were they used for?
I agree with the other posters--inexpensive clothes. I had a pink pantsuit from K-Mart in bonded, probably acrylic knit: it had a V-neck & flared sleeves trimmed with a wide lace ruffle, and of course, pull-on bell-bottoms. I was in high school. Very Mod Squad! Bonded knits were sort of uncrushable and could be washed and dried without any wrinkles. Permanent press fabrics really only became available in the 1960's (remember Kettle Cloth, anyone?), and then, along came polyester double-knits (remember Leisure Suits?) & other fabrics such as bonded knits.
So just choose a nice heavy drapy knit for your lovely dress you are going to make!

Dzynurbrian

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Date: 12/2/10 4:00 AM

Bonded knits remind me of The Brady Bunch for some reason. haha.

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~Dzynurbrian~

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