SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Forum > Sewing Machines > real sewing machine for a child ( Moderated by Sharon1952, EleanorSews)

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
real sewing machine for a child
sunnidayrain
sunnidayrain  Friend of PR
Advanced
Member since 10/1/11
Posts: 18
Send Message

      



Date: 10/18/11 4:14 PM

I am looking to buy sewing machines for my daughters for Christmas.. They will be almost 7 and almost 7 1/2 then. This is what they both asked for. They do have special needs and can get frustrated and so I am really looking for machines that will meet their needs and also not spend too much.
I dont want to go the "toy" route as it would just end up frustrating them as the toys dont sew very well and are not durable.
I am looking for this machine to last for them until they are about 13 or so or longer.
The features that I am looking for are a one step button hole, reverse, straight stitch, zig zag stitch and maybe just a couple more. Nothing fancy but able to actually sew through a few layers of fabric for them to make doll blankets or whatever without issues. Mechanical or computerized does not matter.. as long as durable and simple. A 3/4 size machine would be nice but I wont pay for for a 3/4 size machine that for the same features on a full size.
They will only be sewing supervised in a public area and not their rooms so we dont have sewing accidents on RTW things lol.
I really dont want to spend more than $100 since I am buying 2 off them. I am considering the Brother LS 590, Brother XL 2600i, Brother HS 2500 refurb. , brother XL 3750 refurb, Janome 11558 Refurb.
Is there any other machines that are in this price point and specifications that I should be considering ?
Do any of you have any advice or experience pros or cons of any of these machines?

I am an adoptive mother and the special needs issues are mental and and behavioral and academic due to their multiple diagnosis including FAS, ADD, ADHD, Bipolar. I am thrilled that they want to learn to sew! My mother began teaching me to sew when I was 5.. and so to share this legacy with my daughters is really a dream come true.

Ami

------
Adoptive Mom to 3 with FASD + ABC diagnosis ages 7,7, 10
mid 80s singer ( retired.. but keeping for memories.. first sewing machine) , Brother XR 65-T. Simplicity Frontier Serger, Kenmore 19606, Juki HZL -F600

quiltingwolf
star
quiltingwolf
Intermediate
Member since 12/15/02
Posts: 6737
Send Message

      



In reply to sunnidayrain


Date: 10/18/11 4:19 PM

Honestly the way you described them is the sewing thing such a good idea at this age? Sewing is all about patience. Have they sewn on a machine before? I would really think about this.

------
quiltingwolf.blogspot.com

Betakin
star
Betakin
Advanced
Arizona USA
Member since 4/22/04
Posts: 7282
Send Message

      



In reply to sunnidayrain


Date: 10/18/11 4:42 PM

If I am understanding correctly, say you would like a machine that would last for several years and also prefer full size and have a budget of $100 each for 2 machines.
I suggest that you check out the Jem Gold and Jem Silver models that are still offered at on line dealers though they are now discontinued models. These are smaller machines that perform like bigger machines and were made for quilters and the Sewing Guild to take to classes and guild meetings. In fact the Jem Silver is a special anniversary model with the ASG logo on it and on the little carry bag. I purchased one for $199 years ago on line.
I have seen them on line as low as $150 but originally I think the cost before they were discontinued was around $350-$399. I think Janome also gave them as a gift with purchase for a TOL model.

I gave a Jem Silver to one of my married daughters as a wedding gift several years ago. These are machines of quality made by Janome out of Taiwan and have a top load horizontal bobbin and horizontal thread spool. These are basic mechanical machines but have the most needed stitches like blind hem etc. They also make a beatiful 4 step buttonhole which many of the smaller machines do not.

I think it is great that your girls want to learn to sew. I have 29 dgk's and now 3 of the dgd's are learning to sew. One of the girls has a Janome large full size model that does not perform very well and it is a fairly recent model. I wish she had a Janome Jem that I think she would enjoy so much more. Her mom bought her a basic 4 thread serger off of CL and boy she does enjoy that serger and she is only in 6th grade and has made several items that she created on her own.
Another dgd was given an inexpensive Brother machine last year. It is a very basic model. She is so in love with the machine, and thinks it is sooo pretty too so she loves to use it. I went over to teach her how to FM quilt on her machine and found it did not have a drop feed and she had lost the feed cover plate that come wth the machine. We will just try and find her a feed cover plate now cause she truly loves that machine.
I hope your girls will love their machines too and love learning to sew on them.
-- Edited on 10/18/11 4:45 PM --

Nonette
star
Nonette
Advanced
Member since 3/11/09
Posts: 255
Send Message

      



In reply to sunnidayrain


Date: 10/18/11 4:58 PM

The Janome sew mini sewing machine is on sale at hancockfabrics.com for $49.99 right now. It's not a toy. It's a real sewing machine. Check out the PR reviews - there several of them. Looks like a good decent machine for the price. I am inclined to buy one for my granddaughter, but the shipping cost to Hawaii is too high. Good luck!

sunnidayrain
sunnidayrain  Friend of PR
Advanced
Member since 10/1/11
Posts: 18
Send Message

      



Date: 10/18/11 5:42 PM

Thank yall for your input so far. To answer a reviewer: patience is a virtue that all people need to learn whether special needs or not . All 3 of my children are on medications so they are not nearly as spazzed out as they would be without. ( my son is in an RTC right now and really not interested in sewing. First thing in the morning before meds kick in and right before bedtime after meds wear out is the most challenging time and so sewing.. along with schooling is just not doable but there are alot of very teachable moments inbetween those hours. They require more supervision than other children their age. however one of their strong points is mimicing which includes learning skills.. ( not academics) In addition I want them to explore their options of what they can do, creative or otherwise. Rocket scientist they will honestly never be but it would be a good thing to learn a life skill such as sewing whether for practical reasons or pure joy. If after trying for a while they hate it then no I would not hold that agaist them at all but all I can do is atleast give them that opportunity especially if they specifically ask for it after watching me and knowing that I make them clothing and such. kwim?

Ami

------
Adoptive Mom to 3 with FASD + ABC diagnosis ages 7,7, 10
mid 80s singer ( retired.. but keeping for memories.. first sewing machine) , Brother XR 65-T. Simplicity Frontier Serger, Kenmore 19606, Juki HZL -F600

CM_Sews
CM_Sews
Intermediate
California USA
Member since 9/18/04
Posts: 1811
Send Message

      



Date: 10/18/11 7:13 PM

One option that may be worth considering is to convert a vintage motorized machine to a hand crank machine.

4-H Sew Green (opens a PDF)

This PDF is about a 4-H activity where you provide kids hand-crank machines to make a small project (a bean bag). However, it has LOTS of information about how to convert a vintage machine to a hand crank, including links to additional online resources. A Singer 99 or a Singer Spartan are smaller (3/4 size) machines that can be converted this way, but you can also convert a full size machine. Lots of helpful advice in the PDF.

Sew-Classic sells the needed spoked hand wheel and crank. (I'm sure there are other vendors who sell these parts, too.) Together, these two parts cost about $30. Notice also the Finger Needle Guard.

If a vintage machine has a cast-on motor mount, then you can probably convert it to a hand crank machine. Any vintage machine with bad wiring or a dead motor could be a candidate for conversion and a new life as a kid sewing machine.

CMC

Maia B
star
Maia B  Friend of PR
Advanced Beginner
Illinois USA
Member since 10/27/10
Posts: 4798
Send Message

      



Date: 10/18/11 7:15 PM

I have a son with serious focus/attention issues despite above average intelligence. But he does better with the steps of sewing than other ordered tasks. Go figure... The Janome Sew Mini I had was loud and crappy. But I got a Kenmore Mini Ultra for $50. Maybe a vintage machine? Maybe one machine, since supervising is hard enough anyway? Just thoughts, though it's obvious you are a thoughtful mom.

------
🌸 Plenty of machines, mostly Berninas 🌸

auntie bellums
auntie bellums  Friend of PR
Intermediate
California USA
Member since 5/1/05
Posts: 187
Send Message

      



Date: 10/18/11 8:00 PM

I teach sewing to youngsters. One thing that you may want to take into consideration is a machine with speed control. It's really great for little ones because you can turn the speed down to where the needle isn't going much more than a very slow crawl even if you jam the peddal all the way down.

At 7 years old you might want to start with hand sewing first. You might find out that that is about all they can handle. I don't usually suggest that you start until around 9. There's two reasons, one is the attention span issue and second is the dexterity issue. Most kids at age 7 want to sew for 10-15 minutes and then they are done for the day. My own daughter I started at 7, with some very simple projects, but there were days I wanted to ship her off.

Good luck on the search.

------
It's not your mamma's sewing.....It's your great grandmamma's

Franksdottir

Franksdottir  Friend of PR
Advanced Beginner
Member since 4/25/08
Posts: 3265
Send Message

      



In reply to sunnidayrain


Date: 10/18/11 8:56 PM

Quote: sunnidayrain
Thank yall for your input so far. To answer a reviewer: patience is a virtue that all people need to learn whether special needs or not . All 3 of my children are on medications so they are not nearly as spazzed out as they would be without. ( my son is in an RTC right now and really not interested in sewing. First thing in the morning before meds kick in and right before bedtime after meds wear out is the most challenging time and so sewing.. along with schooling is just not doable but there are alot of very teachable moments inbetween those hours. They require more supervision than other children their age. however one of their strong points is mimicing which includes learning skills.. ( not academics) In addition I want them to explore their options of what they can do, creative or otherwise. Rocket scientist they will honestly never be but it would be a good thing to learn a life skill such as sewing whether for practical reasons or pure joy. If after trying for a while they hate it then no I would not hold that agaist them at all but all I can do is atleast give them that opportunity especially if they specifically ask for it after watching me and knowing that I make them clothing and such. kwim?



Ami

Another thing to consider: If they try it now and either get tired of sewing or have trouble mastering it, you can always put the sewing machines away and bring them out again when the girls are older. Sometimes, even for those of us who do not have special needs, it takes more than once to really embrace an interest.

My mother was a Home Ec teacher, but she never liked sewing or needlework, although she did an excellent job at all of them. I knew she knew how to knit, so I asked her to teach me. I tried it, and stopped. A few years later, I asked her again, and she showed me again. It was not until the third time that it stuck with me - I wasn't ready before then, even though I had obviously had some interest in it.

So, if it is too much for them, or for one of them, it may just be that you need to try again as they or she get older. They have lots of time to come to it.

------
Barb

bellsew
star
bellsew  Friend of PR
Advanced
Washington USA
Member since 10/14/03
Posts: 390
Send Message

      



Date: 10/18/11 10:51 PM

What a timely topic! I'm in the process of converting a featherweight to a handcrank for a seven year old niece. I was worried about speed control and thought she could learn with a hand crank first. After she gets the hang of it, I'll put the motor and belt back on. It only has straight stitch and reverse, but that's all she needs right now for her dolls. I am not affiliated with the seller, but there is a seller on eBay who makes hand cranks for featherweights. I had a featherweight that I found on craigslist which had not been previously loved, so I cleaned it up, tuned it up, added a pink cover, and now it's ready for a new life!

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Sewing Machines >> real sewing machine for a child

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Fun with Fitting - PANTS
Fun with Fitting - PANTS

Register

Sew a Designer Unlined Jacket
Sew a Designer Unlined Jacket

Register

Petite Plus 204 Pattern

Petite Plus 204 Pattern

Buy Now
Sewing Workshop Nikko Jacket Pattern

Sewing Workshop Nikko Jacket Pattern

Buy Now

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.