SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Forum > Sewing Machines > Does your machine sew both sides of a buttonhole forwards? ( Moderated by Sharon1952, EleanorSews)

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
Does your machine sew both sides of a buttonhole forwards?
Looking for models that do
Marie67
Marie67  Friend of PR
Intermediate
UNITED KINGDOM
Member since 8/10/08
Posts: 32
Send Message

      



Date: 6/7/12 9:11 AM

Hi Everyone,

I still haven't decided how to tackle my buttonhole problem.
Reading various reviews on the boards, I'm now thinking that maybe the way forward, is to find a machine that sews both sides of a buttonhole in a forward direction.

Does your machine do this?
How satisfied are you with the quality of your buttonholes?

I don't really need an embroidery machine. Looking forward to hearing your suggestions for both old and new machines. Thanks!

gramma b
star
gramma b
USA
Member since 7/25/08
Posts: 3004
Send Message

      



Date: 6/7/12 9:22 AM

WHY is this?
2 of mine, one 4-step and 1 1-step, both do not always sew an equal satin stitch on the return on the right side. You can turn the fabric around at the end if this happens. Also if you practice, you can sew without the buttonhole foot and just do 2 joined satin stitches on some fabrics.

ilesliemy
ilesliemy  Friend of PR
Intermediate
TX USA
Member since 2/25/05
Posts: 927
Send Message

      



Date: 6/7/12 9:55 AM

My Bernina 440 sews both in the same direction and I always make a test one first because there is a way to balance them side to side if it is "off". My Bernina 185 is the same but there are even more ways to make lovely buttonholes as the size of the bead can also be adjusted.
Leslie

------
Bernina Gal

Marie67
Marie67  Friend of PR
Intermediate
UNITED KINGDOM
Member since 8/10/08
Posts: 32
Send Message

      



In reply to gramma b <<


Date: 6/7/12 3:26 PM

That's the problem I've got, or did have until the buttonhole function stopped working altogether. I'm not sure why it happens, but I think its to do with the machine going in reverse.

I was reading the boards, and someone said that they have that problem even with a Bernina (I think they were talking about an old 830), and that's how they can tell its due for it's service, i.e. when it starts to go weird on the reverse return up the right hand side.

Unfortunately, I don't get a lot of time to sew (an hour a week if I'm lucky), so I want to spend it working on fitting issues, and making garments, rather than getting stressed about poor buttonholes. I thought maybe getting a machine that does both sides forward might be more reliable.

Marie67
Marie67  Friend of PR
Intermediate
UNITED KINGDOM
Member since 8/10/08
Posts: 32
Send Message

      



In reply to ilesliemy <<


Date: 6/7/12 3:36 PM

Thanks Leslie, that's good to know.

I think being able to adjust the size of the bead would be very useful, working with different fabrics. Are you able to adjust the gap between the beads as well?

ilesliemy
ilesliemy  Friend of PR
Intermediate
TX USA
Member since 2/25/05
Posts: 927
Send Message

      



Date: 6/7/12 4:04 PM

I don't remember about the space between the bead, sorry and I can't check because it is in the spa for its yearly "rest". I do still love this machine for all it can do. I always refer to it as the overly computerized wonder machine. Today a 1090 sits in its spot!
Leslie

------
Bernina Gal

gramma b
star
gramma b
USA
Member since 7/25/08
Posts: 3004
Send Message

      



In reply to Marie67 <<


Date: 6/7/12 4:27 PM

I have vintage mechanicals I'm partial to, did find info--forgot where, maybe Google it?--on just measure evenly, make your buttonholes using the satin stitch and crossbars with no special foot. Have not practiced a lot, but it did work on certain fabrics, (knits were behaving badly) assuming your satin stitch is even forward and reverse, or if not flip it around after going down the left side.
I don't know what the "bead" is they are talking about!
Luckily, many patterns have no buttons these days.

PattiAnnJ
star
PattiAnnJ
Advanced
OH USA
Member since 12/3/06
Posts: 7244
Send Message

      



In reply to Marie67 <<


Date: 6/7/12 7:06 PM

This would be a feature to add to your wish list before shopping. Ask for a demo.

------
I dont give them Hell, I just tell the truth about them and they think its Hell. Harry Truman

"Improvise, adapt and overcome." - Clint Eastwood/Heartbreak Ridge

lareine
star
lareine  Friend of PR
Intermediate
NEW ZEALAND
Member since 11/10/06
Posts: 1070
Send Message

      



Date: 6/7/12 7:08 PM

A vintage straight stitch machine with a mechanical buttonholer will sew the whole buttonhole with the machine going forward, not in reverse (the buttonholer itself moves the fabric from side to side, and forwards/backwards). I don't know if that is what you are after but it might be a cheap solution, since the machines and buttonholers are usually inexpensive and easy to find.

The quality of the buttonholes is excellent and they are very easy to use.
-- Edited on 6/7/12 7:09 PM --

beauturbo
beauturbo
Advanced
CA USA
Member since 5/2/09
Posts: 3304
Send Message

      



In reply to Marie67 <<


Date: 6/7/12 7:44 PM

I do like that, when machines do on purpose have some button holes that on at least one side of the button holes, (most times the leg of it so they don't have to run in reverse direction) they do straight stitch backwards, then after that, forwards over that in the satin stitch with a zig zag.

The reason I like it that way, is machines just tend to stitch forward and the feed dogs move better forwards than backwards, and less push and pull issues and less registration issues/factors for making button holes just for me like that. If it has some straight stitch underlay under both or one of the legs of the button hole that way too, (just to get the machine stitching both sides of a button hole in the same forwards direction) then that is icing on the cake for me, and it tends to act as sort of a stabilizing running stitch underlay for the button hole also, and stabilizes things a bit more even that way, and also gives a nice stable base for the button hole, and the top stitching then is even raised up a bit, by that underlay stitching, under it.

Some of my machines do that, some don't. Most times you do need a machine with an electronic controlled needle bar to do it that way though, not more just an all mechanical kind of one though. To see which machine might have a bunch of button hole choices like that, if you were not even in front of it and could not just try and sew out though, I think you would need to look at the owner's manual for each one. Because in there, is where they go through all the different kinds of button holes, and they would probably show pictures with arrows or such, in the ways and movements of how each button hole choice was just sewed out each time.

I think the very best button holes I have ever got done that way, would even be on a old and no longer even sold new at all, Singer XL1000, XL5000, XL6000 or elna Xquisit kind of machine, (made for elna or Singer but actually made by Juki for them, in the Juki Japan factory) but a current Juki HZLF600 that I have sewn on, has a lot of the same exact button holes built into it. That one has more an electronic plug in button hole foot, but I don't think that makes any difference in just my sew out (bad or good) to me at all. I'm sure tons of other machines all over the place have button holes sewn out with most of the zig zag stitches moving in a forwards direction often too, (sensors in the foot it's self or not) but just most times, they really are not the least of all the most inexpensive ones at all either. So you get what you pay for sometimes.

Also buttonholes are a kind of personal thing in what someone might like or not, just each time and a bunch of people could all just like different ones and how they all sew out, very different than someone else sometimes.

Add into that, that I think only less than half of it is even a machine most times, and the other half really is the operator, and probably fabric choice matching to button hole style choices, your fabrics, your threads, and even if you use regular 3 ply garment sewing thread for the button hole or more softer 2 ply embroidery kind of thread instead. Also if you just choose to have your lock stitches stitches meet in the middle of the fabric there, or on purpose more like them to meet more on the back of the fabric instead.

I actually think best looking button holes for me, are most times with 2 ply nice and bendable 100 % embroidery kind of cotton thread, no polyester or polyester core in that thread at all, having the stitches more interlock closer to the back of the fabric there and not in the middle of it, and all sorts of other factors going on at the same time too.

Probably why the proof and meeting what anyone would like in anything, buttonhole wise could vary and is just sort of a good test sew on anything, before you get it even.

Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Sewing Machines >> Does your machine sew both sides of a buttonhole forwards?

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Break your Serger Out of the Box
Break your Serger Out of the Box

Register

Bust Adjustments
Bust Adjustments

Register

Beginner Sewing Lab 104 - A downloadable Book by Shannon Gifford

Beginner Sewing Lab 104  - A downloadable Book by Shannon Gifford

Buy Now
Sewing Workshop Onde Jacket Pattern

Sewing Workshop Onde Jacket Pattern

Buy Now
Kwik Sew 2177

photo
by: Passion4Se...

Review

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.