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Message Board > Fabrics and more... > Wool Challis question ( Moderated by CynthiaSue)

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Wool Challis question
I'm reading that the seams may rip...
solveg
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solveg  Friend of PR
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Date: 6/29/12 4:05 PM

So I just got the "all about" series and am reading about wool challis, which I have a lot of. It says the seams may pull apart. It also says that it is "easier to tear".

Sooooo... When I read about the seams pulling apart, I started thinking about making reinforced seams in some manner. But the fact that the fabric can tear has me thinking that I'd rather have a seam pull apart than the fabric tear, so maybe I should use very gentle stitching in seams.

Then I remembered that in quilting old tops, you must use a cotton, weaker thread, because you'd rather have the thread break than the fabric tear.

So, to sum up. My preferences, in order, if something has to give....

1. thread breaks.
2. Seams pull apart.
3. Fabric tears.

Now... how to accomplish that?

LynnRowe
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LynnRowe  Friend of PR
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In reply to solveg <<
thumbsup 1 member likes this.


Date: 6/29/12 6:17 PM

Use regular all-purpose polyester sewing thread, line or partially line the garment, or don't use it for very close fitting garments.

Baby seams, with two rows of close together straight stitching, gives you a back-up line of togetherness. Serge the seams, to provide give in the seam lines.

You can also make stays to help protect the fabric. For example, if you're sewing a wool challis skirt, you can insert a waist stay so the stay takes the wearing stress, not the skirt.

As wool challis tends to be on the sheer side, lining will protect the seams, as well as give coverage.

Cut a large swatch, say 6" square, and tear at it. Pull, twist, take out all your inner angst on it. That will tell you how much stress that particular fabric will take...and it's likely to be more than you think. Better to know before you sew & go, though.

-- Edited on 6/29/12 6:20 PM --

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I heart Panzy, Pfaff Creative Performance, the sewing machine love of my life!
And Baby (Enlighten serger), Victor (BLCS), Rupert (Pfaff 2023-knits expert) Ash (B350SE-Artwork), Kee (B750QEE-Panzy's BFF), Georgie (B560-Kee's baby sister) and the Feather-Flock!

Most of all, I heart Woo (HimmyCat). Until we meet again, my beautiful little boy. I love you.

heathergwo
heathergwo  Friend of PR
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In reply to solveg <<


Date: 6/29/12 8:31 PM

Off topic, but aren't you LOVING the "All About" series?? I am finished reading the cotton and about 1/2way through the silk and yet to touch the wool book. I LOVE learning all this and having the samples to touch and feel!!!

------
Brother Innovis 1250D
Babylock Enlighten
Singer Curvy 8763
Brother 1034D
Janome 385.19606
Brother 2340CV

solveg
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solveg  Friend of PR
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Date: 6/29/12 9:06 PM

I just got it today, and I haven't put the swatches in yet. I have to get some double sided tape. But this will be exactly* the resource I need. In fact, I expect it will pay for itself several times over by keeping me from choosing the wrong fabric.

LynnRowe
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In reply to solveg <<


Date: 6/29/12 9:50 PM

Tip: when you get fabric swatches from online fabric sellers, attach them into your All About books, too.

Fabrics can be very different from each other even with the very same fibre(s) and weave. For example, a rayon/Lycra knit may have lots of stretch...or very little; it may have snappy, good or slow recovery. Boiled wools can be different weights and thicknesses. Some silk shantungs are more slubby and duller in luster than others.

Enjoy the series, they really are superb!

------
I heart Panzy, Pfaff Creative Performance, the sewing machine love of my life!
And Baby (Enlighten serger), Victor (BLCS), Rupert (Pfaff 2023-knits expert) Ash (B350SE-Artwork), Kee (B750QEE-Panzy's BFF), Georgie (B560-Kee's baby sister) and the Feather-Flock!

Most of all, I heart Woo (HimmyCat). Until we meet again, my beautiful little boy. I love you.

solveg
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solveg  Friend of PR
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thumbsup 1 member likes this.
Date: 6/29/12 10:43 PM

oooooh! Good idea.

And thanks for that information, Lynn.


OH! I just realized that these books are even cooler than I thought! I remembered enough about sewing to remember that linen and wool were very easy to sew. But now, armed with these books, I can clearly avoid materials that are difficult to cut out or sew.

(I'm laughing, remembering when I was a kid and learning to sew. We had a basement cedar closet, and in there was my mom's fabric stash, as well as her old 1950's clothes. She was a beauty queen, so she had tons of weird ballgown fabrics. I had free range in the closet and would pull out some fabric blindly and then make something with it. I remember specifically a pair of overalls made from pink baby flannel and a skirt/vest combination made out of hunting dog upholstery material.)
-- Edited on 6/30/12 0:44 AM --

rtrittel
rtrittel  Friend of PR
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Date: 6/30/12 1:06 AM

Pink flannel overalls?? Wow!

So, what is this "All About" books series? Who is the author and how can I find this source? It sounds brilliant!

------
"Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful." - William Morris

solveg
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solveg  Friend of PR
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Date: 6/30/12 1:17 AM

Here's the linkie.

Here's how it works. When I first opened it up, I was very disappointed. I whined, "WHAT???? It's a workbook! I thought someone else was going to do the work FOR me." Then I took a closer look. Someone HAD done the work for me. The fabrics are presented in spreads. ON the left side is a blank square for a large swatch of fabric. It is blank, with an "attach sample here" note. On the same page is a wonderful description of the fabric, as well as variations of the fabric.

For instance, I am looking at damask... a fabric I am unfamiliar with. I learn it is woven on a jacquard loom and has a contrasting luster, I can use either side of it, and a lengthy comparison to brocade. Then it talks about the finishes and where it comes from, and what fibers besides cotton that can be damask. There are call-outs to double and single damasks, table damask, and jacquard.

On the right side is a checklist, which is the same for every fabric in the series. It is a checklist. I scan the checklist and see that it is easy to sew, should be used for fitted, semi-fitted and loose-fitted clothes, It can have pressed pleats and tucks, soft gathers and many other styling options. It has a section for what to expect from the fabric as you use and wear it, suggested care, and where to find it.

And much to my relief, all the swatches are in an envelope in the back of the book. In order. Which means I will be doing this in a room with a door locked against my dogs.

edit: oh, and the pink flannel overhauls had a baby motif on it like cinderella or ducks with umbrellas or something.

-- Edited on 6/30/12 1:20 AM --

Nancy K
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Date: 6/30/12 7:08 AM

You just shouldn't make a fitted garment from challis. It's best in a looser, softer garment because of it's nature. Think soft, flowing garments that don't put a strain on the seams.

------
www.nancyksews.blogspot.com

VivianZ

VivianZ  Friend of PR
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Date: 6/30/12 9:26 AM

I made a top out of a wool challis, but it was a scarf thin weight. But I loved the fabric, so....... The top was flowy,to sew it I used french seams, but it had a yoke, and it did start to rip at the yoke, I went back and reiforced it underneath with a piece of bias tape, and it has held.

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